Unpopular Opinions? - Page 3


Page 3 of 7 FirstFirst 1234567 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 68

Thread: Unpopular Opinions?

  1. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by Squalid Glass View Post
    I disagree. Art has always been a vehicle for explicit social commentary. Look at just about every historical piece of work. From Gilgamesh to Shakespeare to Star Wars, a crucial aspect of art has always been the politics of the artist.
    Yes, that's exactly what I'm saying. I've noticed that people only call something 'propaganda' if they disagree with it, but call it 'art' or 'entertainment' if they agree with it. Captain America was 'propaganda' to the Nazis but 'entertainment' to Americans. Only anti-Marxists call The Grapes of Wrath propaganda. Only non-Christians call Pilgrim's Progress propaganda. But 1984 or "The Times They Are A'Changin" could just as easily be called propaganda; their political/moral goals are just as obvious.

    And it's not just in the political realm--all art has some kind of agenda or message, explicit or implicit, intentional or otherwise. Even if you are of the opinion that art must be beautiful, the line still remains blurry--just look at old WWI and II posters.
    "So long is the way to the unknown, long is the way we have come. . ." ~ Turisas, Five Hundred and One

    "[An artist is] an idiot babbling through town. . .crying, 'Dreams, dreams for sale! Two for a kopek, two for a song; if you won't buy them, just take them for free!'" ~ Michael O' Brien,
    Sophia House

    Christ is risen from the dead,
    trampling on Death by death,
    And on those in the tombs,
    lavishing light.



  2. #22
    I disagree. Art has always been a vehicle for explicit social commentary. Look at just about every historical piece of work. From Gilgamesh to Shakespeare to Star Wars, a crucial aspect of art has always been the politics of the artist.
    I think there has been a critical fracturing of core values in the west, so now a large percentage of the population doesn't agree with the values being presented by the 'ruling' artistic class (Hollywood). That's why so many movies seem 'political' now, nobody can agree on any level of fundamental morality, so people grasp at weird politamoral tropes that are floating through intelligentsia to give their work some semblance of existential meaning.
    Dead by Dawn!

  3. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by bdcharles View Post
    Hmm ... unpopular opinions ... OK. Here goes.

    ...

    ...

    ...

    I think Neil Gaiman is a lovely guy but a really boring writer.
    *Triggered*

    no but seriously, I have heard this before and am curious: What is boring about Gaiman exactly? Is it his actual stories or the writing style or both?
    "If you don't like my peaches, don't shake my tree."

  4. #24
    Global Moderator Squalid Glass's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Colorado Springs, Colorado
    Posts
    1,604
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by BornForBurning View Post
    I think there has been a critical fracturing of core values in the west, so now a large percentage of the population doesn't agree with the values being presented by the 'ruling' artistic class (Hollywood). That's why so many movies seem 'political' now, nobody can agree on any level of fundamental morality, so people grasp at weird politamoral tropes that are floating through intelligentsia to give their work some semblance of existential meaning.
    That's a pretty short sighted view. The morality of artists has always, by its very nature, been at odds with a "large percentage of the population." To be an artist is, in many cases, to be an outcast in some regard. A lot of political and moral and theoretical, abstract art clashes with its contemporary society because a lot of art is designed to critique that society. Face it, some of the best art is created as a moral response to what the artist sees as something unfair or wrong in the world. Think of Picasso's "Guernica", Plath's Bell Jar, or Ginsberg's "Howl." Only with hindsight do these works usually become revered. Look at Socrates. Or Jesus. Or the Romantics. Or the Modernists. Or the musicians of the 60s. Or countless other groups of artists deemed taboo or at odds with the prevailing morality.

    As for Hollywood, the values there are two fold, just like they always have been in Hollywood, and really, with all artists. 1. There is the morality at odds with society that I just discussed. 2. And there is money. Hollywood wouldn't make movies with "politamoral tropes" unless those tropes were in demand and netted them a profit, which they do. Those who find those tropes liberating will celebrate them, and those who find them abhorrent will deride them. Just like all art throughout all of time.

    I guess my point is that complaining that the artistic "elites" have become too political is like saying the wind has become too windy. It is what it always has been. I take issue with the idea that somehow the insertion of political and moral intent has somehow changed now at this moment. That is a view without context. That being said, if your issue is with artists inserting any political or moral ideology into any work, well okay, you have an opinion in line with this thread. But I don't get the sense that that is what you were saying.
    "I don't do anything with my life except romanticize and decay with indecision."

    "America I've given you all and now I'm nothing."

  5. #25
    We're all hypocrites...didn't realize this topic was in writing discussion thread.. doh
    The only one who can heal you is you.




  6. #26
    Wɾʇ∩9 bdcharles's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    In a far-distant otherworld.
    Posts
    3,231
    Blog Entries
    4
    Quote Originally Posted by luckyscars View Post
    *Triggered*

    no but seriously, I have heard this before and am curious: What is boring about Gaiman exactly? Is it his actual stories or the writing style or both?
    I think it's a combination of things. He has all these fabulous characters from myth and legend but they all act and sound like everyday humans. Plus there's often so many of them that they kind of run together and stop being quite so amazing. That coupled with a fairly basic language makes me run out of put-put. That being said I do rate him as a children's writer, and think that's where his strength is. It is of course ultimately down to personal preference.


    Hidden Content Monthly Fiction Challenge


    Beauty is nothing but the beginning of terror which we are barely able to endure, and are awed,
    because it serenely disdains to annihilate us.
    - Rainer Maria Rilke, "Elegy I"

    *

    Is this fire, or is this mask?
    It's the Mantasy!
    - Anonymous

    *

    C'mon everybody, don't need this crap.
    - Wham!





  7. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by bdcharles View Post
    I think it's a combination of things. He has all these fabulous characters from myth and legend but they all act and sound like everyday humans. Plus there's often so many of them that they kind of run together and stop being quite so amazing. That coupled with a fairly basic language makes me run out of put-put. That being said I do rate him as a children's writer, and think that's where his strength is. It is of course ultimately down to personal preference.
    Sounds like some of this is American Gods, right? I haven’t read that one. Only read Coraline, which I thought was above average but is probably classified a kids book and The Ocean At The End Of The Lane which I found so-so.

    I see Gaiman as being a lot about aesthetic. Sort of the Tim Burton of books - it’s that horror-for-people-who-don’t-like-actual-horror, surreal-but-not-unpleasantly-so approach that somehow has remained popular. It’s books for the “outsider kid” to read on the bus. A lot of it’s kind of silly but I do still rate Gaiman for some reason. Part of it probably is because he’s a lovely man.
    "If you don't like my peaches, don't shake my tree."

  8. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by Squalid Glass View Post
    That's a pretty short sighted view. The morality of artists has always, by its very nature, been at odds with a "large percentage of the population." To be an artist is, in many cases, to be an outcast in some regard. A lot of political and moral and theoretical, abstract art clashes with its contemporary society because a lot of art is designed to critique that society. Face it, some of the best art is created as a moral response to what the artist sees as something unfair or wrong in the world. Think of Picasso's "Guernica", Plath's Bell Jar, or Ginsberg's "Howl." Only with hindsight do these works usually become revered. Look at Socrates. Or Jesus. Or the Romantics. Or the Modernists. Or the musicians of the 60s. Or countless other groups of artists deemed taboo or at odds with the prevailing morality.

    As for Hollywood, the values there are two fold, just like they always have been in Hollywood, and really, with all artists. 1. There is the morality at odds with society that I just discussed. 2. And there is money. Hollywood wouldn't make movies with "politamoral tropes" unless those tropes were in demand and netted them a profit, which they do. Those who find those tropes liberating will celebrate them, and those who find them abhorrent will deride them. Just like all art throughout all of time.

    I guess my point is that complaining that the artistic "elites" have become too political is like saying the wind has become too windy. It is what it always has been. I take issue with the idea that somehow the insertion of political and moral intent has somehow changed now at this moment. Sarkari Result Pnr Status 192.168.1.1 That is a view without context. That being said, if your issue is with artists inserting any political or moral ideology into any work, well okay, you have an opinion in line with this thread. But I don't get the sense that that is what you were saying.
    ideas that you said
    and I share the same opinion with you, because you have summarized everything
    Last edited by klimbo; May 22nd, 2019 at 11:06 AM.

  9. #29
    Don't read the last three books in HHGTTG. They ruin the sense of fun.
    Every serious book should have a few jokes in.
    The last track on a Goth Album should be a comedy one.
    A cheese toastie is good for writer's block.
    Quote Originally Posted by luckyscars View Post
    Post some unpopular writing-related opinions you have?

    Opinions have to be related to writing and Officially Unpopular. So something like "the writing in season 8 of the Game Of Thrones TV adaption sucks" doesn't qualify.

    No brawling here, only because it will never end if it begins. Polite questioning/clarifying/discussing/I-beg-to-differ-ings are OK obviously, but let's consider this a place to vent views and perhaps find unlikely allies and consider different viewpoints rather than indulge in circular debates or bickering. I guess if you wanna debate something raised here you can always start a new thread or something.

    Brief as possible

    I'll start with five of mine:

    - Most aspiring fantasy authors would probably be better off if they never read Lord Of The Rings.

    - Short novels are nearly always better than long ones. Inherently long stories tend to work better in a series format.

    - Fight scenes are overrated. There is no way to write a compelling fight scene longer than a couple pages or so.

    - The best endings leave at least one major character's fate unresolved.

    - The less described/explained a character is, the more interesting they usually are.

  10. #30
    Unpopular writing beliefs

    I don't have a problem with having a dozen different perspectives in a story.

    I also don't mind changing the POV. I have alternated 1st/3rd POV in several books. No law says you have to tell the whole story in 3rd person omnipotent.

    I like to write at 4am. Sometimes earlier. (That's gotta be unpopular!)

Page 3 of 7 FirstFirst 1234567 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
This website uses cookies
We use cookies to store session information to facilitate remembering your login information, to allow you to save website preferences, to personalise content and ads, to provide social media features and to analyse our traffic. We also share information about your use of our site with our social media, advertising and analytics partners.