college classes that helped you


Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: college classes that helped you

  1. #1

    college classes that helped you

    What classes have you taken that helped you in your writing, either in person or distance ed? Are there any university distance education classes that you can recommend from personal experience? I took a creative nonfiction class (an old fashioned snail-mail correspondence class) a few years ago. It was helpful for building my confidence and one of my essays was later published, but for several reasons I wont recommend that specific class. But it was worthwhile and I'm glad I took it. I'm thinking of taking another class on mythology in literature. Although I don't have much native interest in the topic (other than The Odyssey, I've never read much in the genre) I think it could be interesting, and might help my critical reading and writing. I just know it will force me to read and wrote, which can't hurt.

  2. #2
    The world's college English teachers are going to commit suicide en masse when they see this thread...

  3. #3
    Fine. I don't want that on my head.

    One of the few useful courses I had was critical thinking. I mean, if you have no natural abilities in that regard, life will eat you alive regardless.
    But I found some of the tools used in that class were helpful in many areas, including writing.

    "Wubba Lubba Dub Dub!"



  4. #4
    I didn't find much in my college classes that really helped, but in jr. high and high school, we had a kick-ass English department. We did Romeo and Juliet, Watership Down,Murders in the Rue Morgue, Where the Red Fern Grows, The Scarlet Letter, The Outsiders, The Martian Chronicles, wrote our own plays, wrote our own fantasy stories, did speech and debate, mock trials... Even in elementary school, we did A Wrinkle In Time, the Narnia Chronicles... We were also allowed/mandated to keep a journal and free-write in it for the first ten minutes of every class... We also explored the poetry of Keats, Yates, Wordsworth, Poe, and Shakespeare.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Winston View Post
    Fine. I don't want that on my head.

    One of the few useful courses I had was critical thinking. I mean, if you have no natural abilities in that regard, life will eat you alive regardless.
    But I found some of the tools used in that class were helpful in many areas, including writing.

    I would think so. I have a science degree which I hope taught me critical thinking skills. There's a lot of drivel out there from writers who don't.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Amnesiac View Post
    I didn't find much in my college classes that really helped, but in jr. high and high school, we had a kick-ass English department. We did Romeo and Juliet, Watership Down,Murders in the Rue Morgue, Where the Red Fern Grows, The Scarlet Letter, The Outsiders, The Martian Chronicles, wrote our own plays, wrote our own fantasy stories, did speech and debate, mock trials... Even in elementary school, we did A Wrinkle In Time, the Narnia Chronicles... We were also allowed/mandated to keep a journal and free-write in it for the first ten minutes of every class... We also explored the poetry of Keats, Yates, Wordsworth, Poe, and Shakespeare.
    That sounds great! I only took one or two semesters of high school English on my way to dropping out. I had very definite preferences at that age (Ray Bradbury) and really didn't want to read things that didn't interest me. I look back on it now as one of my biggest mistakes in life. Now, many years later I'm interested in all of those writers. I could of course just read them on my own but getting feedback on my writing about my reading is also important...so I'm thinking of taking some classes

  7. #7
    Bradbury was a god.... He has inspired countless scores of aspiring writers. Amazing, wonderful man.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
This website uses cookies
We use cookies to store session information to facilitate remembering your login information, to allow you to save website preferences, to personalise content and ads, to provide social media features and to analyse our traffic. We also share information about your use of our site with our social media, advertising and analytics partners.