Anyone for a happy ending? - Page 2

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Thread: Anyone for a happy ending?

  1. #11
    I'm intrigued by the idea of the villain as victor. A goodie-two-shoes hero encounters a twisted, complex, yet fascinating and even likable villain. The climax, clash, inevitable battle, and the villain walks out of the "Thunderdome" brushing the dirt from his fingers and stalks off into the sunset. Hahahaha....

    A current story I'm working on, the protagonist is one nasty piece of work, but... he's understandable. Think of the "hero" in, "Falling Down," for instance.
    Her: I love my computer! All of my friends are in there!
    Me: Yeah, I was thinking the same thing about my freezer...
    Her: What?
    Me: What?

  2. #12
    I enjoy a happy ending, but love suspense too. My ending encompasses both, something I hope will fly. It seems hopeless my hero will survive the fate I've given him, and I totally make my reader think he's perished due to the circumstances. However, I think I've pulled it out with one final sentence, a repeated dialog from early in the story that was a turning point. And something I hope gives my readers hope there is more story to come.
    Last edited by 50shadesofdoubt; May 16th, 2019 at 07:05 PM. Reason: Ommitted words

  3. #13
    I am a sucker for a happy ending. There's enough darkness and despair in the world, I enjoy reading something that takes me somewhere with floofy clouds and hearts and rainbows and ice cream and ponies for everyone lol. It definitely depends on the story itself as well as the genre. Like Dluuni said - what good is a romance that doesn't get its happy ending? That being said, an ending that is shocking or sad or traumatic has its place and can strongly affect a reader, for better or worse. I've read some books where the ending left me like WTF???, but in the long run, it served the story line well.

  4. #14
    I like the ending that's right for the story. I know that sounds like a non-answer, but the truth is that sometimes a story should be sad, and sometimes it should be happy. Sometimes it should be hopeful, or even just thought-provoking. But the one thing a story should NOT have is an ending for its own sake - that is, an ending intending to evoke a certain mood even when it's uncalled for.

    If I'm reading a (fictional) account of World War II, I don't want the ending to have Hitler and Churchill shaking hands and becoming regular golfing buddies. If I'm reading a feel-good story, I'm going to be annoyed by a sad ending that's there just to be "complex." And there's no rule that the hero (or anyone) has to die in order for a story to be "good." Death and darkness, by themselves, don't make for a good story - though of course neither do happiness and sunshine. The correct ending is the one that the story should have.
    "Either write something worth reading or do something worth writing." - Benjamin Franklin

    "I do not over-intellectualize the production process. I try to keep it simple: Tell the damned story." - Tom Clancy

  5. #15
    Funny thing, though: The books we remember most are the ones that tore our hearts out: "The Outsiders," "The Book Thief," and, "Where the Red Fern Grows."
    Her: I love my computer! All of my friends are in there!
    Me: Yeah, I was thinking the same thing about my freezer...
    Her: What?
    Me: What?

  6. #16
    Hi L2me,
    welcome to WF, I am very pleased to meet you.

    I find endings write themselves. Although I hope one day to reach the same level of memorability as the end of the original Italian Job. Yeah, big ego ain't I?
    Good luck
    BC
    Quote Originally Posted by L2me View Post
    I want to know how you guys feel about happy endings? Should a writer just give the reader what they want, the girl getting the boy, the bad guy defeated, the pretty couple riding off into the sunset or is a story improved by leaving the reader in a state of emotional turmoil?

    Does it depend on the story? The characters? The genre?

    Does the reader even know what they really want?

    Do people prefer books/films etc where the ending is wrapped up neatly and everyone's happy?

  7. #17
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    I think that's really interesting. I love the anti-hero. Renton in Trainspotting is my perfect example. but there's something fascinating and viscerally exciting about watching someone who's the opposite of yourself in many ways.

    Wanna tell me more about the story?

    My protagonist isn't an anti hero so to speak but he isn't likeable especially at the start he's not even interesting he's basically a blank slate but he's definitely got that negative energy that comes out as the story progresses.

  8. #18
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    I love it. nice to meet you too.

    If you're going to aim, might as well aim high!

    How do you find the writings going?

  9. #19
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    I very much feel the same way. i think i just want to be effected by the ending i want it to leave something in me rather than just, oh great they're fine, good guy wins, goodnight.
    I want to still be thinking about the book when i'm a work or whatever with the characters still speaking to me and making me think about what i'm doing.

  10. #20
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    Brilliantly put that's how i feel, i don't think it's necessarily about the ending it's about whether the ending was satisfactory to the story. Romeo and Juliet didn't have a happy ending and that's done pretty well for itself. i think it has to feel natural to the story, nobody wanted 'we need to talk about kevin' to end with his mother happy in a new relationship and content guilt free.

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