What Turns You On? - Page 2

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Thread: What Turns You On?

  1. #11
    The story, characters and setting. It also has to be with invisible strings.

  2. #12
    Beautiful writing, vivid imagery. If there's an interesting person or place that I can visualize right away, that's a hook.

    Humor or wit that's genuinely funny (aka makes me laugh out loud).

    I do like in-action starts but I have to 1) like the central character right away and 2) have some idea why the action is happening.

    In general--direct, unpretentious writing that's not trying too hard to be clever. I like humble stories. I'm ok with cheesy or "cliche" if I can sense sincerity, solid characters, and a plot progressing to something worthwhile. If a story begins with "Once upon a time..." or "Once there was..." I will probably keep reading.

  3. #13
    A strong narrative voice all the way. I know if an author nails the voice, the rest will come with it: plot/s, charcter developement. Well, voice and dark romance. The dark themes can take you to some pretty gut-wrenching places and mess with you emotions and head. And I like to be toyed with when it comes to the head.
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  4. #14
    Complex and contradictory characters that seem believable. I believe its something you always hear that readers want. "To study changes of the human heart." Seems like a good way for a writer to try this. It's not easy and we know why these sort of characters are interesting. You care about the characters, and want to know what makes them behave that way. That they become larger than life and are seem to be interesting characters. I wish I'd found more of these kind of characters in my most read genre. Supposedly science fiction is more plot focused at the expense of characterization.
    I would follow as in believe in the words of good moral leaders. Rather than the beliefs of oneself.
    The most difficult thing for a writer to comprehend is to experience silence, so speak up. (quoted from a member)

  5. #15
    A character asking a genuinely difficult or thought-provoking question. Rare, since essentially all philosophy is well-traveled ground, but this is probably the quickest way to get me to pay attention.
    Good dialogue and a character I can fall in love with and root for almost instantly would be close seconds.
    Dead by Dawn!

  6. #16
    I'm kind of a reading whore in that I like a lot of different styles and methods of conveying thoughts. I write fiction but am a shameless non-fiction junkie. Many of the stories and books that I was impressed by in my younger years were from the era before everything became about the character-driven-story, so I often fall in love with a story that has no character development, but a great story.

    Hell, sometimes I beat-off to technical diagrams.

  7. #17
    The amount of world-building an author puts into their work. Not just for sci-fi or fantasy, either. Whether it's an exotic locale in a foreign dimension or the streets of New York City or a rural country town, I find I can barely put a book down if the author has paid attention to making it a living, breathing world. Not everyone has been to New York City. Not everyone has been to France, to Rome, to London... Making contemporary locations a living, breathing world is just as important as doing the same for the exotic fantasy world you might create for a story about dwarves, elves, and men.

  8. #18
    Characters that feel real, that come to life on the page and give me insight into how people think, act, and react. If the writer can accomplish this, such as in Christine, (which I just read,) I'm all in.
    ďAs far as we can discern, the sole purpose of human existence is to kindle a light of meaning in the darkness of mere being,"

    -Carl Jung

  9. #19
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
    Location
    Minneapolis
    Posts
    16
    I love, love, when people have poetry or a quote before the beginning of a chapter! It's just the perfect cherry on top

  10. #20
    Relateable characters and a plausible plot. When a character goes against his or her character just to move the plot, I often quit the book.

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