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Thread: Your Rules On Writing

  1. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by Megan Pearson View Post
    Hey, CyberWar,

    I see what you're saying. If I may summarize your post, your desire is for an honest representation of life. I, too, desire that in my writing. And I also agree that the media-generated worldview is flawed. Here's a question, one I think you've wrestled with for you point out how even scoundrels can surprise the world with acts of valor. If we, as writers, glorify evil as being the ultimate value in our works, then where is there room for redemption or hope?

    Just a thought.

    Megan
    I think the best struggles in literature aren't the ones with an external enemy, but with one's own inner demons and base nature. After all, a man's worst enemy is almost always himself. Which is why I believe the anti-hero type to be the best kind of protagonist. I find it much more relatable when a deeply-flawed character finds it in himself to do the right thing despite the desire and temptation to do otherwise, rather than simply because it is (to the readers, at least) the right thing to do. An anti-hero makes a much more interesting protagonist than the traditional do-gooder hero who is already a picture-perfect being without much doubt about what moral choice to make.

  2. #22
    I'm more a fan of characters saving the world than inner-conflicts.
    I write pulp fiction, not literature.
    I write about clever people blowing shit up. I got no capacity for all that high-brow stuff.

  3. #23
    Mentor Megan Pearson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CyberWar View Post
    I think the best struggles in literature aren't the ones with an external enemy, but with one's own inner demons and base nature. After all, a man's worst enemy is almost always himself. Which is why I believe the anti-hero type to be the best kind of protagonist. I find it much more relatable when a deeply-flawed character finds it in himself to do the right thing despite the desire and temptation to do otherwise, rather than simply because it is (to the readers, at least) the right thing to do. An anti-hero makes a much more interesting protagonist than the traditional do-gooder hero who is already a picture-perfect being without much doubt about what moral choice to make.
    I can go with that. Basically, you're making an argument for the character-driven story. The battle with the self, regardless of whatever else is going on, fuels how the MC will handle the external difficulties as well. Thanks for taking a moment and elaborating further.
    "A ship in the harbor is safe, but that is not what ships are built for."
    ~ John A. Shedd


  4. #24
    I'm not one to over-administrate my own work, but I do have a few simple rules of my own when writing. They are as follows:

    1) Don't force anything.
    2) Keep it simple, but enticing.
    3) The cast of characters must be relevant to the story being told.
    4) Less is more.
    5) Stick the ending!


    -JJB
    ​"Strong convictions precede great actions....."

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  5. #25
    Member Chris Stevenson's Avatar
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    Use the five senses and don't be afraid of some tasteful metaphor and simile--you've got a crackin' style, so you better use it bub. If you don't have a unique, blisteringly new premise, DON"T even start the damn book.

    Learn from anything else you see on this thread.
    Blog: Guerilla Warfare For Writers:Hidden Content

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  6. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by luckyscars View Post
    Can you elaborate on these two? Not sure I understand.
    Keep it real (with myself)
    What I mean is, I feel I have to find what I'm really trying to say in any piece. Once I know what I'm trying to convey, I can do exactly what's needed to move it forward.

    Serve the message, not the other way around
    Don't try to feed your ego with your writing. The story (again, for me) is something I'm trying to communicate to the audience. If I'm instead trying to display to the audience how awesome of a writer I am, I'm going down the wrong path.
    Where you can purchase a copy of Fallen Sun, my second novel. Hidden Content

  7. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by Tettsuo View Post
    Serve the message, not the other way around
    Don't try to feed your ego with your writing. The story (again, for me) is something I'm trying to communicate to the audience. If I'm instead trying to display to the audience how awesome of a writer I am, I'm going down the wrong path.
    Very important point, that.

    I've seen a lot of writers fail this, and miserably.

    -JJB
    ​"Strong convictions precede great actions....."

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  8. #28
    1) Don't use cliches.
    2) Don't use contrivances to advance the plot.
    3) Don't be "dark" or otherwise emotional when it's not needed.
    4) No profanity. Anything that can be said with profanity can be said just as well, or better, without it.
    5) Everyone, no matter their race, gender, or anything else, is just a human. Don't go out of your way to write for the character's supposed demographic; just treat them like anyone else.
    "Either write something worth reading or do something worth writing." - Benjamin Franklin

    "I do not over-intellectualize the production process. I try to keep it simple: Tell the damned story." - Tom Clancy

  9. #29
    Member Rojack79's Avatar
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    I have been trying to strike a balance in my mind around the action in my story and the characters themselves. I want things to be realistic a.k.a. believable when it comes to the characters but I feel like the sometimes over the top action might derail the story. For example one of the MC's is a cybernetic super soldier, for me trying to make him human is easy but balancing out that normal humanity of his with his extreme action sequences I feel is going to be difficult. Unless I'm just over thinking it.
    This might not be my best work but that just means there's room to improve.

    I don't have a big ego. You just can't comprehend my greatness!

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