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Thread: What turns you OFF?

  1. #51
    [QUOTE]Writing weather gets a bad rap because most people do it extremely unemotionally.

    It doesn't have to be bad though. I write about weather sometimes. Here's a good piece of weather writing. Bronte. The Bronte's loved to inject pathetic fallacy into weather and nature generally.]/quote]

    I get that. I've used it myself, particularly as it relates to the mood or atmosphere of the story. It can serve the story amazingly well, if done properly. I've seen authors almost recite it though, as though they were giving an almost robotic weather report.


    I've written about the 'it was all a dream' issue before on here. Still unsure why people get so enraged by it. I mean, yeah, if it's used lazily or as some piece of cheap deus ex machina then I hate that - but some stories it works great for.

    Different folks, different strokes i guess.
    Agreed. "Remains of the Day" was one long dream-sequence. You hit the nail on the head, though. It is often used as a deux ex machina. It becomes trite; more of a literary cheap trick, in order to circumvent the actual work. Basically, my thought is this: You've invested the time and energy to get your characters stuck in a tree. Find a creative way to get them down. It does no good to take the "just a dream" shortcut and, "Whoops! I guess they weren't really stuck in the tree after all, so there's no need to expend the hours of work it's going to take in order to save them!" As a literary device, most of the time, it's a real stinker.
    Her: Have YOU ever hit a deer?
    Me: What, you mean like, in the FACE?
    Her: ....WHAT is the MATTER with you?!

  2. #52
    Member MzSnowleopard's Avatar
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    Crutch phrases. I'm not taking about catch phrases like- one character in my YA series likes to say 'deuces' instead of the normal "right on". I'm talking about phrases the writer uses in the descriptive / content- things outside of characters speaking.

    I used to work with a writing team on a project. One of the ladies didn't work out because the team had issues with her writing style. She habitually used the phrase "once again". When she was asked to stop doing this, she agreed but then continued to use it.

    To this day, over 10 years later, I cringe at the site of the phrase and try to avoid using it myself.
    "Sometimes I wish I could stay asleep, not because my life is that dull and boring but because my dreams are just that good." - Mindy Dyksterhouse (MzSnowleopard)
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  3. #53
    It was a dark and stormy night when page one of the manuscript floated onto the slush pile. If only he had known that the slush had magical properties.


  4. #54
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    Not exactly tangible but any time i feel the story is driven by plot over characters. Might just be me but give me two fascinating characters in a mundane situation over two mundane characters in a fascinating situation any-day.

  5. #55
    Quote Originally Posted by MzSnowleopard View Post
    Crutch phrases. I'm not taking about catch phrases like- one character in my YA series likes to say 'deuces' instead of the normal "right on". I'm talking about phrases the writer uses in the descriptive / content- things outside of characters speaking.

    I used to work with a writing team on a project. One of the ladies didn't work out because the team had issues with her writing style. She habitually used the phrase "once again". When she was asked to stop doing this, she agreed but then continued to use it.

    To this day, over 10 years later, I cringe at the site of the phrase and try to avoid using it myself.
    Once again, you've hit the nail on the head. Seriously, every once in a while, I catch myself doing it. "After a moment," seems to be mine. When I go back to a piece of my writing to actually start editing, I often just groan and start chopping those things out and substituting other phrases that mean the same thing, to get away from repetition.
    Her: Have YOU ever hit a deer?
    Me: What, you mean like, in the FACE?
    Her: ....WHAT is the MATTER with you?!

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