Editorial Reviews = SOCIAL PROOF!


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Thread: Editorial Reviews = SOCIAL PROOF!

  1. #1

    Lightbulb Editorial Reviews = SOCIAL PROOF!

    PRO TIP:
    One way to gain SOCIAL PROOF for your book is to purchase an editorial review. An editorial review (NOT to be confused with a customer review) has 4 key benefits.1. It provides social proof - especially helpful when the book is brand new & hasn’t accumulated many customer reviews yet. 2. It's essential if you want your book to be purchased by several libraries. (many U.S. libraries order books based on reviews published by Kirkus). 3. It acts like a final round of copyediting to the extent the reviewer finds any remaining typos.4. Posting an editorial review (containing relevant keywords about your book) on your book's Amazon listing & author website should raise the visibility of your book on those platforms.The biggest downsides are the cost and amount of time they take. For popular editorial reviews like Kirkus, Clarion, and Blue Ink, be prepared to spend $400 to $700 (depending on the length of the review and how fast you want it) and know that it can take upto 3 months.Luckily, some reviewers are much cheaper and faster. For example, Publisher’s Daily Reviews only costs about $100 and can usually complete it within a week. Hope this tip helps!
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    Mikeyboy_esq
    Check out my books for authors including SMART MARKETING FOR INDIE AUTHORS and 14 STEPS TO SELF-PUBLISHING A BOOK.
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  2. #2
    No. Bad enough that reviewers want hard copy. Screw that system.
    Hidden Content
    "From the moment I picked your book up until I laid it down, I was convulsed with laughter. Someday I intend reading it." - Groucho Marx

  3. #3
    Not sure what you meant. My editiorial reviewer (Publisher's Daily Reviews) downloads my ebook from Amazon and uses that to review the book. No need to mail him a print copy. I'm not sure how the other editorial reviewers do it.

    I don't think editorial reviews are totally necessary for book sales, but they don't hurt to have them. But the one exception is that if you intend to sell your book to several libraries, you definitely need to buy a Kirkus editorial review.
    Mikeyboy_esq
    Check out my books for authors including SMART MARKETING FOR INDIE AUTHORS and 14 STEPS TO SELF-PUBLISHING A BOOK.
    Hidden Content

  4. #4
    There are a lot of well-established editorial reviewers in-genre (reps of various big five firms). They seem to feel that they should be paid obeisance or they don't publish. Much like Kirkus. Our books get reviewed by Publisher's Weekly and get sent to the trio of anthologists that do the annual best-ofs (Ellen Datlow, Michael Kelly, DAW books) -- who don't ask for hardcopy. Kirkus didn't do a damn thing for us and neither do any of those other jerkoffs. They promise a lot and deliver none of it.
    Outside of PW, I will release review copies on request only. No hardcopy. It's just not worth the expense. No reviewer sells enough books to make that worthwhile.
    Hidden Content
    "From the moment I picked your book up until I laid it down, I was convulsed with laughter. Someday I intend reading it." - Groucho Marx

  5. #5
    Wow, that's a lot of money for marketing!! I'm new to the self-pub side, and usually, if I can get away with no outlay costs when it comes to marketing, I'm happy. I've been trade for 7 seven years, though, so I have a comfort zone of an established reader/reviewing base. If it's proven to help get library attention, then that could be a big plus if you're new on the scene (it's not specifically targetting general readers, so doesn't compromise ethics), but you're going to need that cash upfront.

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