Do I need permissions to cite other people's work in my book? - Page 3


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Thread: Do I need permissions to cite other people's work in my book?

  1. #21
    This link is great Mikey. It led me to the following which cleared up a lot:

    http://www.mbbp.com/news/writers-guide-to-fair-use

    Thanks!


    Quote Originally Posted by Mikeyboy_esq View Post
    Just to be clear, it's important to note the difference between plagiarism and copyright infringement. If you quote language from someone else's copyrighted work (e.g., a book or article) without their permission and give them credit for the quote, then you are not committing plagiarism. However, it is still possible that you have infringed on that person's copyright.

    Whether you infringed on someone's copyright or not depends on the facts. To avoid copyright infringement, some traditional publishers take the view that if you quote 300 words or less from a third party's copyrighted work (without their permission), then you don't need their permission. I've heard others say quoting 50 words or less, or one paragraph or less. The truth is there is no standard length. Obviously, the longer the quote, the more riskier it is. Generally, a book title is too short to be subject to copyright protection (however, a title can sometimes be protected under trademark protection). Even if you quote a long passage (several pages), you can avoid infringing on someone's copyright if you satisfy the Fair Use Doctrine (e.g., if you use the quote for non-profit education purposes) or if the quote comes from a work that is in the public domain. Here's a great article on this topic from Jane Friedman... https://www.janefriedman.com/permissions-and-fair-use/

  2. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by Mikeyboy_esq View Post
    Just to be clear, it's important to note the difference between plagiarism and copyright infringement. If you quote language from someone else's copyrighted work (e.g., a book or article) without their permission and give them credit for the quote, then you are not committing plagiarism. However, it is still possible that you have infringed on that person's copyright.

    Whether you infringed on someone's copyright or not depends on the facts. To avoid copyright infringement, some traditional publishers take the view that if you quote 300 words or less from a third party's copyrighted work (without their permission), then you don't need their permission. I've heard others say quoting 50 words or less, or one paragraph or less. The truth is there is no standard length. Obviously, the longer the quote, the more riskier it is. Generally, a book title is too short to be subject to copyright protection (however, a title can sometimes be protected under trademark protection). Even if you quote a long passage (several pages), you can avoid infringing on someone's copyright if you satisfy the Fair Use Doctrine (e.g., if you use the quote for non-profit education purposes) or if the quote comes from a work that is in the public domain. Here's a great article on this topic from Jane Friedman... https://www.janefriedman.com/permissions-and-fair-use/
    Wow, that's a very clear and concise explanation. Nice!

  3. #23
    Yes, I would also like to thank Mikey again for that important information, particularly the distinction between plagiarism and copyright infringement.

    -Charles

  4. #24
    Bard & Charles,
    You are most welcome! FWIW, I teach business law at a local college (including a chapter on copyrights and other intellectual property). So I've had a little practice at explaining this stuff. Glad it helped.
    Last edited by Mikeyboy_esq; April 22nd, 2019 at 09:27 PM. Reason: add words
    Mikeyboy_esq
    Check out my books for authors including SMART MARKETING FOR INDIE AUTHORS and 14 STEPS TO SELF-PUBLISHING A BOOK.
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