Do I need permissions to cite other people's work in my book? - Page 2

Submit your creative works to Flashes >>HERE<< .

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 24

Thread: Do I need permissions to cite other people's work in my book?

  1. #11
    You do not paraphrase at all. You quote verbatim. Also, quoting song lyrics is definitely an IP issue.
    Hidden Content
    "From the moment I picked your book up until I laid it down, I was convulsed with laughter. Someday I intend reading it." - Groucho Marx

  2. #12
    Really? You cannot paraphrase and then cite? You can only quote someone? I have seen many instances of people paraphrasing and then citing. Are you saying that this is plagiarism?

    I have no need for quoting song lyrics, although I do mention the song title "Good Vibrations" on a number of occasions, but I don't think that's a problem.

  3. #13
    You'll have to provide an example of what you mean -- I am unclear on what you're trying to get across. My point is that you don't quote anything that isn't verbatim. You can truncate a phrase, represented by ellipses, but anything else is misrepresentation.
    Hidden Content
    "From the moment I picked your book up until I laid it down, I was convulsed with laughter. Someday I intend reading it." - Groucho Marx

  4. #14
    I will point out that in the Fanfiction community, it is considered good manners to get permission before using another authors work whether you cite them or not. That may (possibly) be where your reviewer is coming from. I also think that fiction writers need to get permission before quoting another's work in some instances.
    Nonfiction is another beast entirely, of course, and properly citing sources in enough in all circumstances I am aware of.

  5. #15
    Moderan, of course, anything you put in quotation marks must be verbatim, otherwise you are misrepresenting another author's work. But let's say that you mention: Linda May, a noted Fung Shui expert, suggests that the ch'i moves faster through flat areas, such as plains, and therefore does not have a chance to settle.1 Now, if this is approximately what she said in her book and you are paraphrasing it, does this constitute plagiarism? I am not sure how else to ask it.

  6. #16
    No, it isn't plagiarism, and as long as the first party isn't quoted or misrepresented, it's hard to see where there's a problem, other than the premise that ch'i is obstructed by material objects, which is questionable at best. Heh. But that isn't what you were asking about, so sure. Put the actual quote in a footnote to cover ya.
    Hidden Content
    "From the moment I picked your book up until I laid it down, I was convulsed with laughter. Someday I intend reading it." - Groucho Marx

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by moderan View Post
    There's very little need to consult an intellectual property lawyer. The rules are clear and easily understood as far as citations. Quotations, attribution, correct fidelity. If the publisher wants to consult an IP lawyer, let them foot the bill.
    I quote people every damn day of my life.
    I'm also an editor and publisher and it's seriously a non-issue if you follow the rules -- which are easily available to a casual googling. Here's a good document to read:

    http://www.u.arizona.edu/~rlo/482/plagiarism.pdf
    I disagree. The laws on copyright are just too diverse, and what might be okay to use in one country won't be in another. You really are better off seeking advice from a lawyer.

  8. #18
    Aquilo, I am sure you are right. But I am more concerned with the United States or Great Britain, the only two countries where I will contact publishers.

    You and moderan have spurred me to review all of my citations and quotations carefully, to eliminate ambiguity of attribution and misrepresentation. I thank you for that.

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by Aquilo View Post
    I disagree. The laws on copyright are just too diverse, and what might be okay to use in one country won't be in another. You really are better off seeking advice from a lawyer.
    Reading comp 101:
    "If the publisher wants to consult an IP lawyer, let them foot the bill."
    Hidden Content
    "From the moment I picked your book up until I laid it down, I was convulsed with laughter. Someday I intend reading it." - Groucho Marx

  10. #20
    Just to be clear, it's important to note the difference between plagiarism and copyright infringement. If you quote language from someone else's copyrighted work (e.g., a book or article) without their permission and give them credit for the quote, then you are not committing plagiarism. However, it is still possible that you have infringed on that person's copyright.

    Whether you infringed on someone's copyright or not depends on the facts. To avoid copyright infringement, some traditional publishers take the view that if you quote 300 words or less from a third party's copyrighted work (without their permission), then you don't need their permission. I've heard others say quoting 50 words or less, or one paragraph or less. The truth is there is no standard length. Obviously, the longer the quote, the more riskier it is. Generally, a book title is too short to be subject to copyright protection (however, a title can sometimes be protected under trademark protection). Even if you quote a long passage (several pages), you can avoid infringing on someone's copyright if you satisfy the Fair Use Doctrine (e.g., if you use the quote for non-profit education purposes) or if the quote comes from a work that is in the public domain. Here's a great article on this topic from Jane Friedman... https://www.janefriedman.com/permissions-and-fair-use/
    Mikeyboy_esq
    Check out my books for authors including SMART MARKETING FOR INDIE AUTHORS and 14 STEPS TO SELF-PUBLISHING A BOOK.
    Hidden Content

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
This website uses cookies
We use cookies to store session information to facilitate remembering your login information, to allow you to save website preferences, to personalise content and ads, to provide social media features and to analyse our traffic. We also share information about your use of our site with our social media, advertising and analytics partners.