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Thread: Judging Book Cover Designers' Reputations

  1. #11
    Mentor Dluuni's Avatar
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    The other thing is that every book tapers off. At a certain point, the best return on your investment for marketing you can do is.. to market another book.

  2. #12
    Media Manager sigmadog's Avatar
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    Granted, this is a little late, but in looking at your covers from a design standpoint, I find them typographically weak. In my view, creating good book cover design is like creating a poster, and great poster design combines vibrant illustrations with compelling typography. Whoever designed your covers spent a good amount of time on some nice illustrations, but when it comes to typography, it looks like they just mailed it in.

    I'm not all that familiar with the children's fantasy market, so maybe to them visually dazzling typography isn't as important as simple and clear typography. On the other hand, I've seen the toy, cereal box and candy packaging kids respond to in supermarkets, and "simple and clear" doesn't really describe those designs.

    Also, when it comes to cover illustrations for kids books, I wonder if showing the face (that is, having the character in the image facing the viewer) is the best strategy. I think every kid wants to see themselves as the main character, no matter how improbable, so if there is some ambiguity as to the appearance of the main character on the cover, it becomes easier for the potential buyer to place themselves into that scene. Just spitballin' here. I have no data to confirm this, but it has a certain logic to it.

    In this vein, what if the "Fright" book cover image were turned around, and we saw the kid from behind facing off against a horribly large reptile? The kid would be in silhouette, outlined against the FRIGHTening image of a huge snake attacking, and it looked like… holy cow! the SNAKE IS GONNA JUMP RIGHT OFF THE PAGE AT ME WHILE I'M LOOKING!!!!"

    That puts the viewer in the scene, making them a part of the story before they even read a word.

    I don't know anything for sure, but these are my random thoughts.

    Good luck with your book.


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  3. #13
    Mikey is absolutely correct about your sales. Contrary to popular belief, book sales do not keep climbing indefinitely. Your sales will follow a classic sales arc where they climb, hit apogee, then plummet to something just above zero.



    Ideally you should market the book like crazy until it starts to plummet. At that point you should be working on something new.

    BTW: The same sales arc applies to KU-KOLL as well.


  4. #14
    So keep up the marketing, but don't let it get in the way of writing the next book.
    You can only flog a dead horse for so long.

  5. #15
    Member Chris Stevenson's Avatar
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    From my previous post (up there), which was a romance book, to my just released YA fantasy book, dear lawd, the difference is night and day. I have received three interview requests and 47 book requests from known review bloggers. The YA book smashed my records. Some of the reviews are just starting to roll in. It will take time to get up the sales momentum, I'm sure. Now I did have an idea of how good this book was, going into the market place strictly for show, but I had to ask several readers and authors what made this one pop. First: The cover. A second later the title "screamed" at them. The blurb--never heard of the premise before. The first sample chapter launched the story.

    But above all, it WAS the cover. And I owe my publisher's artist credit for doing such a fine job on getting the genre across on a 6in by 9in platform. It was a traffic stopper. It could be a little hard to see as a thumbnail image, but a lot of detailed covers are like that.
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