New words and expressions you've noticed recently that are trending?


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Thread: New words and expressions you've noticed recently that are trending?

  1. #1

    New words and expressions you've noticed recently that are trending?

    What are some new words and expression you've started noticing trending in your area?

    I watch a lot of sports shows, and I've noticed a new word this past year that everyone just started using. In the past, you'd hear them say something along the lines of, "It's not a good look." It's used generally to make commentary on something from a PR standpoint. Like if there's some kind of internal leak from the front office of a sports organization that garners negative publicity. Or if an athlete says something dubious that makes people scratch their heads.

    Now instead of saying, "look," they use the word "optics." So instead of, "It's not the best look," they'll say, "It's not the best optics." Or I've also heard something along the lines of, "Optically, it's not great."

    Almost everybody says this now, so it spread almost overnight. I didn't hear the word "optics" being used before outside of maybe my eye doctor's office.

    Another word I started noticing lately is the word "foment." I've read this word here and there in the past, but I've never liked it, because it sounds like you're a baby trying to pronounce "ferment." It's just a bad sounding, uncommon word that I guarantee the vast majority of the population don't know. Basically I understand it as another word for "create," and it seems to be used in conjunction with the idea the action in question, creates a bad precedent. It's usually used among analysts, whether it's political news or sports news, where they'll say something like, "It foments the idea that blah blah blah."

    And then an expression I've started hearing among the youth is, "This is everything," or "That is everything," to describe something is great. Basically, it's short for, "This means everything to me." Like, "Oh my God, I used to come to this library everyday when I was a kid. This is everything."

    And finally, I've noticed people no longer say, "as opposed to," anymore. They say "opposed to." They've shortened it. It sounds kind of weird to me, just because I'm oldfashioned, I guess, and I usually had to do a double take to realize they're saying "as opposed to."

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  3. #3
    It's tough. I saw "I'm lowkey kinda pissed" recently, I never heard lowkey used that way before, but I could trace it back at least a few years with a few hundred entries in Google. But you don't even want brand new, you want new and somewhat established, right?

    The thing is, they're kind of precious. Even for making people laugh in real life. It's amazing. Someone recently made us all life saying "I'm having a moment." I made people laugh by saying "You're enabling us" and "We were just trash-talking you." Those aren't new, but they're new enough. I routinely explain some "tricks" for doing things as "This is a good cheat."

    And speaking of, in my most recent novella, a black man has taken a white woman into a rest area along the interstate, but she is dressed like a prostitute and he like a thug. And we read:

    He looks around the room and a lot of people are looking at us. "The optics here be really bad. Time to go."
    The word "optics" probably triples the value of that line.

    Look for nonverbals too, those seem to be growing. From my website on cutting edge grammar: I shot her a side-eye (The Almost Sisters, Jackson)
    How to write a good start: Hidden Content . Useful, original information. Long and thorough.
    Includes Hidden Content (do you start with description?), Hidden Content (a favorite with publishers apparently), starting with Hidden Content (a lost art), and more.

  4. #4
    I heard "lowkey" too.

  5. #5
    Legit. Rather than saying, legitimate, as in, "She was legitimately mad," I've been hearing, "She was legit mad." It irritates me. It legit​ irritates me. *cough*
    Her: I love my computer! All of my friends are in there!
    Me: Yeah, I was thinking the same thing about my freezer...
    Her: What?
    Me: What?

  6. #6
    For me, the great irony of this thread is that I remember a time when I had to look up "trending".


  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Amnesiac View Post
    Legit. Rather than saying, legitimate, as in, "She was legitimately mad," I've been hearing, "She was legit mad." It irritates me. It legit​ irritates me. *cough*
    When did people start putting nonverbals between asterisks?
    How to write a good start: Hidden Content . Useful, original information. Long and thorough.
    Includes Hidden Content (do you start with description?), Hidden Content (a favorite with publishers apparently), starting with Hidden Content (a lost art), and more.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Istine View Post
    For me, the great irony of this thread is that I remember a time when I had to look up "trending".
    And the difference between trending and "going viral"?
    How to write a good start: Hidden Content . Useful, original information. Long and thorough.
    Includes Hidden Content (do you start with description?), Hidden Content (a favorite with publishers apparently), starting with Hidden Content (a lost art), and more.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by EmmaSohan View Post
    When did people start putting nonverbals between asterisks?
    You seem irritated, and that seems awfully petty. Sorry if my post legit bothered you.
    Her: I love my computer! All of my friends are in there!
    Me: Yeah, I was thinking the same thing about my freezer...
    Her: What?
    Me: What?

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Amnesiac View Post
    You seem irritated, and that seems awfully petty. Sorry if my post legit bothered you.
    No, I love the idea of asterisks to mark nonverbals. I'm guessing it came out of texting? It isn't in the grammar books, as far as I know. *shrugs helplessly*

    I was disappointed by legit. If it means just "awesome", like some dictionaries said, it isn't that useful. We already have them; it would just be temporary. If it meant "legitimately", or something like that, it would be interesting. As in your example.
    How to write a good start: Hidden Content . Useful, original information. Long and thorough.
    Includes Hidden Content (do you start with description?), Hidden Content (a favorite with publishers apparently), starting with Hidden Content (a lost art), and more.

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