Science Fiction is Not About Science - Page 9


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Thread: Science Fiction is Not About Science

  1. #81
    Pish and tush... My mind is like a firework display in a fog, I get all sorts of strange results and very few of them pan out sensibly. In a forum full of pedants I would expect nothing but the best of quibbles.

    1984 was written in 1948, a daring stab at what the future will look like. Maybe it should be under Horror but I claim it for Sci Fi.
    Quote Originally Posted by luckyscars View Post
    Hope nothing taken personally here, bazz. I didn't mean to imply you are sloppy!

    Funny you mention 1984, I re-read it the week after Trump's inauguration and found it eerie. Is 1984 considered science fiction?

  2. #82
    Quote Originally Posted by bazz cargo View Post
    Pish and tush... My mind is like a firework display in a fog, I get all sorts of strange results and very few of them pan out sensibly. In a forum full of pedants I would expect nothing but the best of quibbles.

    1984 was written in 1948, a daring stab at what the future will look like. Maybe it should be under Horror but I claim it for Sci Fi.
    It's definitely speculative fiction. I always thought of it as being an early example of what they now call 'dystopian fiction'. Maybe even a political thriller? I'm not sure. A lot of stuff gets lumped as science fiction that appears to have close to zero science.
    "If you don't like my peaches, don't shake my tree."

  3. #83
    Social science, psychology, the tech behind Big Brother surely counts?
    Quote Originally Posted by luckyscars View Post
    It's definitely speculative fiction. I always thought of it as being an early example of what they now call 'dystopian fiction'. Maybe even a political thriller? I'm not sure. A lot of stuff gets lumped as science fiction that appears to have close to zero science.

  4. #84
    is all fiction speculative?

    now i know what's wrong with my writing.
    factual fiction.
    that's the ticket!


    *snorts and blows pop alllll over*

  5. #85
    ^ The Donald is waiting for you...

  6. #86
    Quote Originally Posted by bazz cargo View Post
    Social science, psychology, the tech behind Big Brother surely counts?
    k.
    so wiki says dystopian, political fiction, social science fiction.

    also says:
    "
    Throughout its publication history, Nineteen Eighty-Four has been either banned or legally challenged, as subversive or ideologically corrupting, like the dystopian novels We (1924) by Yevgeny Zamyatin, Brave New World (1932) by Aldous Huxley, Darkness at Noon (1940) by Arthur Koestler, Kallocain (1940) by Karin Boye and Fahrenheit 451 (1953) by Ray Bradbury.[16] Some writers consider the Russian dystopian novel We by Zamyatin to have influenced Nineteen Eighty-Four,[17][18] and that the novel bears significant similarities in its plot and characters to Darkness at Noon, written years before by Koestler, who was a personal friend of Orwell.[19]
    "
    also included in the wiki are several other dystopian titles.
    k.
    just so g.o. can roll over, what looked like scifi
    in 1948, experienced in 2019 will probably
    be classified differently.
    nice example of POV/context gap(s)
    *on my scifi shelf*

  7. #87
    Quote Originally Posted by bazz cargo View Post
    ^ The Donald is waiting for you...
    the donald & the golden arch/arches have bigger, better, very good,
    great things to spend time and energy on.

    i can make a darn good burrito tho'.
    'spose i'll have to put chili powder stripes on it or sumfin.

  8. #88
    I have come across a Sci Fi western, a Sci Fi set during mediaeval times and lots of almost contemporary Sci Fi. Is there a place for a Kung Fu Sci Fi?

    What weird tales could we tell...

  9. #89
    Sci-fi bodice ripper ? There is lots of children's sci-fi. Sci-fi travel guide? Take a towel. Sci-fi almanacs and calendars, diaries, biographies, rom. com. , where do you stop ? Sci-fi 'Home alone' ? Sci-fi Enid Blyton? 'Five go off into space'
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    Piglet's picks. Hidden Content

  10. #90
    Quote Originally Posted by Olly Buckle View Post
    Sci-fi bodice ripper ? There is lots of children's sci-fi. Sci-fi travel guide? Take a towel. Sci-fi almanacs and calendars, diaries, biographies, rom. com. , where do you stop ? Sci-fi 'Home alone' ? Sci-fi Enid Blyton? 'Five go off into space'
    Quote Originally Posted by bazz cargo View Post
    I have come across a Sci Fi western, a Sci Fi set during mediaeval times and lots of almost contemporary Sci Fi. Is there a place for a Kung Fu Sci Fi?

    What weird tales could we tell...
    I think this is kind of the problem, isn't it? There's a constant conflation between science fiction that actually explores/exposes/applies scientific concepts in some meaningful way (Asimov, Bradley, Verne) and the 'science fiction' of anything that feels a bit 'out there'. If Tolkien had contrived and explicitly stated some backstory about Middle Earth being 'a long time ago in a galaxy far, far away' Lord Of The Rings would have as much of a right to be called 'science fiction' as Star Wars. Why not? It has as much to do with science.

    It's become a matter of tropes and costuming, basically. Something like James Bond doesn't make it into the sci-fi section despite having plenty of futuristic technology and occasionally quite a bit of actual science in it, because it doesn't 'feel like sci-fi'. Meanwhile any old dross with an alien or a time machine does, despite the fact the vast majority rely overwhelmingly on nonsense. According to wikipedia, Back To The Future is science-fiction. On what basis is that science fiction? I like Back To The Future just fine but there is very little science in it and what trifling attempts are made are obviously not based on anything deemed remotely feasible.

    Aficionados may appropriately divide the genre into that which is 'hard' science fiction and otherwise, but in most spheres of day-to-day life (like a bookshop) they all get lumped together. Which possibly is part of the reason why many people find the genre hard to take seriously these days, while many others have such a poor grasp of science vs. pseudoscience.
    "If you don't like my peaches, don't shake my tree."

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