Science Fiction is Not About Science - Page 2

Read our latest author interview on Flashes >>HERE<< .

Page 2 of 21 FirstFirst 1234567891012 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 201

Thread: Science Fiction is Not About Science

  1. #11
    Consider the old mcguffin. Youngster pushed out of home and meets a mentor. Yeah, I know it has whiskers but if done well it works. With a bit of Sci Fi background it becomes a chance to explore the steps between sheltered child and streetwise adult. How much of a writers own thoughts and feelings are used and how much imaginative moral twisting is down to the plot and whatever occurs in the moment. Always did like the moment, it often surprises me.

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by epimetheus View Post
    Some sci-fi is about science. Artemis by Andy Weir is a good example - explores the practicalities of a moon base with current technology. The author said that the science ideas came first then he built a story to showcase them. And it turned out to be an OK story.
    Have you come across 'Other days, other eyes' by Bob Shaw? A series of stories about the development of 'slow glass', a substance that is not transparent, but transmits light, excellently done.
    Visit my website to read and connect to my 'soundcloud', where you can listen to stories songs and more
    Hidden Content

    A thread of links useful to writers wishing to learn
    Piglet's picks. Hidden Content

  3. #13
    Bob Shaw was a tremendous writer. He also had a spacefaring race that used only wood, and the premise worked in terms of his science. SF is not ABOUT science but it damn well should have it and have it accurate. Otherwise it's fantasy. The two have been lumped together since Del Rey helped destroy bookstore sf by pushing the Sword of Shannara in favor of the rest of their excellent catalogue.
    Sci-Fi is the stuff with nuclear monsters and other b-grade dreck, to us fen. The term is pejorative. The OP betrays surface knowledge.
    Hidden Content
    "From the moment I picked your book up until I laid it down, I was convulsed with laughter. Someday I intend reading it." - Groucho Marx

  4. #14
    Consider my ass well and truly kicked. I love weird monsters, sexual politics dipped in bigot juice, laser gun shoot-outs and spaceships that can turn right angles near the speed of light. My own, personal, prejudice is towards accurate science but I still enjoy Star Wars. I'm at home with pejorative.
    Quote Originally Posted by moderan View Post
    Bob Shaw was a tremendous writer. He also had a spacefaring race that used only wood, and the premise worked in terms of his science. SF is not ABOUT science but it damn well should have it and have it accurate. Otherwise it's fantasy. The two have been lumped together since Del Rey helped destroy bookstore sf by pushing the Sword of Shannara in favor of the rest of their excellent catalogue.
    Sci-Fi is the stuff with nuclear monsters and other b-grade dreck, to us fen. The term is pejorative. The OP betrays surface knowledge.

  5. #15
    Supervisor velo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Probably on a boat in Puget Sound
    Posts
    857
    Blog Entries
    2
    I would say it like this- all forms of entertainment are explorations of the human condition. The ones we like more resonate with some part of us more than other bits of entertainment do.

    When we write stories starring animals or object, we anthropomorphise them. When we write about people we often put them in slightly or greatly unusual situations to see how they react. Every story is an exploration of self.
    My blog- Hidden Content thoughts on trauma and healing through psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy

    "When a child is abused, he or she will often internalise that abuse as deserved. It is a cruel reality that a child needs the parent so much, is evolutionarily programmed to trust them so implicitly, that when a parent is abusive the child will take the blame rather than completely upend their world and blame the person they depend on for survival." -velo

  6. #16
    Good science fiction makes the impossible seem possible.
    God hates a coward Revelation 21:8

    “Good writin' ain't necessarily good readin'.”

    Hidden Content ,

    To encourage and facilitate "me"

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by Olly Buckle View Post
    Have you come across 'Other days, other eyes' by Bob Shaw? A series of stories about the development of 'slow glass', a substance that is not transparent, but transmits light, excellently done.
    No, i'll add to the ever growing list.

  8. #18
    Surely the disciplines of science are a way of using certain fundamental aspects of the human condition, those that drive us to try to find relevance, meaning and structure in everything that we perceive, even though in some people the process may be substantially subconscious. Our brains make models of what we perceive as reality and scientists just happen to go to great lengths to create very carefully thought out models, but even so they are still only models. Therefore to say that science fiction is really more about the human condition than about science is to say very little.

    Inevitably (Oh no, not again!) I feel obliged to refer to my own writing experiences, but then that's the human condition for you. It is perpetually debatable whether it is possible to pass information backwards in time, so stories that depend on this device can't really be classed as bad, good or even maybe hard science, so they often get labelled as "speculative", which ironically boils down to meaning "potentially dependant on information not yet available". The irony is in the fact that the debate itself is about whether even information from the future could already be available somehow, in which case the word "speculative" ceases to imply "unfounded" as some might intend it to and the debate goes nowhere.

    My favourite example of divisive science fiction is the film Interstellar jointly written by Christopher and Jonathan Nolan. Jonathan studied relativity in some depth in order to write the story but apparently distanced himself from the ending that Christopher wrote because he doubted that information could be passed backwards in time across an Einstein-Rosen bridge, i.e. wormhole, from inside a black hole. I guess that must be classed as speculative hard science and a bridge too far for him then. I was amused to discover that I apparently based my own story substantially on ideas from several works by the Nolan brothers that I didn't watch until some time after I had conceived and written it, so I clearly sided with Christopher in practice and didn't even feel the need to find a black hole to acquire my information about their work from the future.

    I don't expect you to believe my peculiar perception of my writing experiences and I have mentioned them here simply to make a point, that the human condition is about personal experiences and perceptions whereas what we call science is more about consensus. Between personal experience and hard science there is a third grey region of speculation. A science fiction story may move the conventional boundaries between these three regions, for example by declaring some speculative phenomenon such as travel faster than light to be practical hard science, or it can position itself somewhere in relation to these regions without moving their boundaries, as my story about passing information backwards in time did by confining the experiences to just a small group of characters whose personal experiences were the only evidence of the phenomenon. There are so many possible ways of mixing up the cocktail of personal experience, speculative science and hard science along with artificially shifted boundaries between them that it is virtually impossible to nail down science fiction as a clear genre, which is why personally I don't.
    'Sharing an experience creates a reality.' Create a new reality today.
    'There has to be some give and take.' If I can take my time I'm willing to give it.
    'The most difficult criticism that a writer has to comprehend is silence.' So speak up.

  9. #19
    I agree with bazz cargo and just rob and and others that said that morality plays a big part. Since morality is in the progress of the human race, and the promise to solve problems. It's similar to other genres without a doubt (fantasy) just like Stars Wars blended them.
    I would follow as in believe in the words of good moral leaders. Rather than the beliefs of oneself.
    The most difficult thing for a writer to comprehend is to experience silence, so speak up. (quoted from a member)

  10. #20
    So where do we stand on Poul Anderson's High Crusade? The novel, not the crap USA film.
    Shannara...post apocalypse adventure featuring genetically divergent versions of humanity and living machine based tech. Hmm....
    I had toyed with the idea of a rock band on tour round the solar system, Spinal Tap meets HHGTTG with some James Bond in the mix.

Page 2 of 21 FirstFirst 1234567891012 ... LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
This website uses cookies
We use cookies to store session information to facilitate remembering your login information, to allow you to save website preferences, to personalise content and ads, to provide social media features and to analyse our traffic. We also share information about your use of our site with our social media, advertising and analytics partners.