Science Fiction is Not About Science - Page 20


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Thread: Science Fiction is Not About Science

  1. #191
    The thing about books being required reading in school is that no book is for everyone, so there will always be some being forced to read something they don't want to. I can not believe that good comes of that. To my mind people should read things they enjoy reading, why bother with anything else? There are so many books out there twenty readers could read twenty books a year for twenty years and never have to read a book they did not enjoy reading.
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  2. #192
    Member Rojack79's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Olly Buckle View Post
    The thing about books being required reading in school is that no book is for everyone, so there will always be some being forced to read something they don't want to. I can not believe that good comes of that. To my mind people should read things they enjoy reading, why bother with anything else? There are so many books out there twenty readers could read twenty books a year for twenty years and never have to read a book they did not enjoy reading.
    Good God I hated being forced to read the hunger games series. It was so dull and just plain stupid as a story. It felt like it was "dark & gritty" just for the sake of it. Oh look I'm going to kill children by forcing them to murder one another for the elite classes entertainment! That's not a story that's just a crappier rip off than the twilight novels. At least they had some depth to there characters and a decent story that was somewhat believable.
    This might not be my best work but that just means there's room to improve.

  3. #193
    Odd... It reminded me of the Romans. With a bit of 1984 mixed in. I have some notes on a vampire-y type story with a twist.
    What the world will look like after Armageddon is a popular trope, it seems always be grim and sexist. Now there is a challenge.
    Quote Originally Posted by Rojack79 View Post
    Good God I hated being forced to read the hunger games series. It was so dull and just plain stupid as a story. It felt like it was "dark & gritty" just for the sake of it. Oh look I'm going to kill children by forcing them to murder one another for the elite classes entertainment! That's not a story that's just a crappier rip off than the twilight novels. At least they had some depth to there characters and a decent story that was somewhat believable.

  4. #194

  5. #195
    Quote Originally Posted by -xXx-;2223529
    [COLOR="#40E0D0"
    *time to restock*
    *popcorn?*
    [/COLOR]
    And jelly tots?
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  6. #196
    Quote Originally Posted by Olly Buckle View Post
    And jelly tots?
    flavor preference(s)?
    not a fan of non-grape-purples....

  7. #197
    As the discussion on the original subject of this thread had died down I didn't notice the bit about 1984 until now.

    Quote Originally Posted by Theglasshouse View Post
    My little brother read it in an American high school. He gave me 1984 as one of my birthday presents as well as On writing by Stephen king.
    I still remember watching the BBC TV version of Orwell's novel at home in 1954 at age ten. According to Wikipedia it was "hugely controversial" and the room 101 scene with the rats was "infamous". Personally at that age I didn't find it at all disturbing compared to The Quatermass Experiment broadcast by the BBC in 1953, so maybe the fictional science in a story can have far more impact on some minds than the human issues. A huge sentient alien plant won hands down over an oppressive human regime as a source of terror in my mind apparently, regardless of the probability of encountering either in reality. Of course in 1954 the probability of either was remote, a very different situation from ten years or so earlier, so the reaction of adults such as my parents to the two stories must have been very different from mine. To them The Quatermass Experiment was no doubt nothing more than entertaining fiction. The same highly influential sci-fi and horror scriptwriter, Nigel Kneale, was involved in both BBC productions. Stephen King was only seven years old when Nigel Kneale's screen version of 1984 was televised.
    'Sharing an experience creates a reality.' Create a new reality today.
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    'The most difficult criticism that a writer has to comprehend is silence.' So speak up.

  8. #198

  9. #199
    Hello Just Rob. Here's my point of view on your post on horror in general. I think kids should not watch horror movies or perhaps even read books on it. Sure, I do have a cousin in the family who when she was 4 years old would laugh at horror movies. I think horror movies can cause psychiatric problems to some people. I was ironically born the same year as Orwell's titled novel. I think it is important since it was during the world war 2 and oppressive regimes. Hitler was creating and inspiring other countries, and thus we find ourselves in a much more oppressive future. One where the atom bomb was created. How it affected today's world instead of 1984 would be interesting to know. But 1984 is a predictor and it got some things right. I would think the science of it and the mind police, echoes, Aldus Huxley's novel on censoring and freedom of expression and creativity. When controlled this is important predictor of something either good or bad. We humans must be creative and scientifically advancing, but we don't know the harmful effects of the science we will discover.

    Back to the subject of why I think horror movies are bad in general, I believe kids should be censored from seeing them. Because of their innocence I would not advise a parent to let them see it. Fear should be avoided when young.

    On the science, I would say the effects of the science like the atom bomb could have made science fiction popular for a good while. Not just the works, but the cultural background. Historical novels based on science fiction are important. It's a good genre to write in. I don't mean alternate history but rather reflecting on the future by looking at the past.

    Orwell wrote diaries on his points of view, which I will later snag a copy in the near future (no pun intended). I think he wrote a more important work people credit him for. He wrote with relevance the modern era, and whether someone can reinvent it will prove very interesting if successful. The reason is because it resonated with a lot of people. If a writer does that the way he did, they are onto securing their success in science fiction. Science fiction from a historical perspective I have seen some theories. Some say it is Marxist, which I am no philosopher but seems to build a historical context on everything and turns the world upside on its head.

    Thanks for continuing the thread. Now if I can read these theories in a way that is free from jargon. I sound like this would be a good time to learn more about science fiction and its historical influences that helped inspire its literature if I ever found such a book.
    I would follow as in believe in the words of good moral leaders. Rather than the beliefs of oneself.
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  10. #200
    Quote Originally Posted by Theglasshouse View Post
    Hello Just Rob. Here's my point of view on your post on horror in general. I think kids should not watch horror movies or perhaps even read books on it. Sure, I do have a cousin in the family who when she was 4 years old would laugh at horror movies. I think horror movies can cause psychiatric problems to some people.
    Maybe that is a choice that can be made now, but my post was about postwar England. The country was still recovering from the effects of recent history. We children had been raised on a diet controlled by food rationing and there had to be an explanation for the bombed out buildings that still existed in our London streets. Our comics were full of enthralling stories about daring wartime exploits alongside highly imaginative ones about space exploration and aliens. Television was a novelty at the beginning of the 1950s and a TV was a status symbol. Our father bought one so that we could watch the coronation at home. The family predominantly spent the evenings together in one back room of our terrace house, the larger front room being kept for entertaining visitors and special occasions such as Christmas. All television broadcasts were live performances and inevitably the whole family watched them regardless of their content.

    In 1950s England the real horror had long passed and then so did the old king. There was a new air of optimism. I remember going to the 1951 Festival of Britain and watching the coronation of our young queen on that tiny TV screen. We kids had toy guns for shooting at people and toy ray guns for shooting at aliens, but it was all make believe far from the realities that had been. There was no real gun or knife crime on our streets and we kids could wander freely in total safety. Everyone was too busy rebuilding our shattered society to indulge in petty gang culture in those days. I think that nowadays it's real life that can cause psychiatric problems to some people.
    'Sharing an experience creates a reality.' Create a new reality today.
    'There has to be some give and take.' If I can take my time I'm willing to give it.
    'The most difficult criticism that a writer has to comprehend is silence.' So speak up.

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