How Long Do You Edit? - Page 3


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Thread: How Long Do You Edit?

  1. #21
    I'm one of those edit as I go writers, but that doesn't stop me from tweaking and fiddling and rearranging once I've finished. It's a great (and rare) feeling when I don't have the urge to change anything, even if it's just one wee little paragraph.

  2. #22
    I hate editing, so I do as little of it as possible. Finish the first draft, set it aside for a while, then read it over, make some changes, and send it off. Then make whatever changes make sense once the editor has seen it, and that's it.

    I avoid looking at older stuff because of course there are changes and improvements that could be made, but it's too late... that piece is already published. Time to focus on the current project, hopefully written without as many (or at least, without the same​) issues.

  3. #23
    Kelly Gallagher, an education author, once said that a work is never done, it's just due. I actually prefer editing to writing and constantly see where things could be improved in my work and in the works of others. If I'm editing a story or blog post, I usually do at least 3 edits after I think I'm done with the writing in addition to all of the minor edits that I did in the writing process.

    I like the idea of "good enough for copy." If you think it's good enough to send to an editor, you'd probably be safe saying you're "done."

  4. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by wagtail View Post
    I'm one of those edit as I go writers, but that doesn't stop me from tweaking and fiddling and rearranging once I've finished. It's a great (and rare) feeling when I don't have the urge to change anything, even if it's just one wee little paragraph.
    I feel like this is a successful approach and it is one I will use. That and setting it aside, even though you are very sure the draft reads well and correctly. These strategies for editing sound good to try. I will be using a software when the time arises, but I notice, my first mistakes are in need of correcting if I make many in a first draft. Just an observation on my part. So setting it aside can be how many days?
    Last edited by Theglasshouse; February 21st, 2019 at 05:35 PM.
    I would follow as in believe in the words of good moral leaders. Rather than the beliefs of oneself.
    The most difficult thing for a writer to comprehend is to experience silence, so speak up. (quoted from a member)

  5. #25
    Mentor Dluuni's Avatar
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    Limited passes. Reread for structure, arrange, flesh out, make sure everything is consistent and accurate, line edit, proofread, then one last reading and then ship. Successful Artists Ship. I do not want to waste my time on tiny revisions when I have bigger problems.

  6. #26
    I do doublebacks as I write so the first pass is pretty clean.
    But during the editing process I try to look at a story with both a macro and a micro viewer.
    Sure, I get granular with the SPAG* and how the story flows without the reader ever being derailed by bad prose, but I also try to take a wide view and look at the overall plot of the story. Do I need these scenes or did the evolution of the story render that scene moot? Does it drag? Do the characters fascinate the reader...?

    I know the story is good & tight when I can flip to any random page and find myself interested in what is happening there.
    I know I'm done editing when I get sick of reading the #@$! words.



    *I know that SPAG is merely an acronym for Spelling Punctuation and Grammar, but it always sounds so dirty when I write it.
    Seriously, if you walked up to a stranger and offered to show them your SPAG skills they'd prolly pepper-spray you.
    "No, SPAG is just...wait, don't taze me bro!"

  7. #27
    How many days does one take away from seeing their work?

    Or do you just start a new story which seems to be the typical thing to do when one is frustrated with writing that story?
    I would follow as in believe in the words of good moral leaders. Rather than the beliefs of oneself.
    The most difficult thing for a writer to comprehend is to experience silence, so speak up. (quoted from a member)

  8. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by Theglasshouse View Post
    How many days does one take away from seeing their work?

    Or do you just start a new story which seems to be the typical thing to do when one is frustrated with writing that story?
    Minimum 2 weeks. Preferably a month. In current WIP, I have the sequel to plot, I'll set aside the first draft of the first novel, go off and plot the sequel (or two), then come back for a second pass.

  9. #29
    I don't do the same thing, but I do edit while writing. When I finished a novel, I went over it one time to edit.

  10. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by Theglasshouse View Post
    How many days does one take away from seeing their work?

    Or do you just start a new story which seems to be the typical thing to do when one is frustrated with writing that story?
    Ideally I do a quick once-over immediately after finishing a story, then put it away while I write the next story, give the next story a once-over and put IT away, then go back to the first story with fresh eyes and make whatever changes I want before sending it off. So... three or four months of sitting time, probably?

    (Sometimes I have a deadline and can't do this. But when I can, I do)

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