Comic Book characters, the 'Super Hero' genre, and their current popularity. - Page 6


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Thread: Comic Book characters, the 'Super Hero' genre, and their current popularity.

  1. #51
    The comics of my childhood were a bit different, The Beano, The Dandy. I guess that we saw American comics, but Americans never saw the British ones. We had characters like The Bash Street Kids, a class where the overweight boy was called 'Fatty' and the ugly one 'Plug', no-one would dare do that nowadays, and 'Lord Snooty' and his pals, Roger the dodger and Minny the minx, they seemed much more varied and fun than superheroes. They started before my time as a supplement attached to newspapers, then became independent. 'Nice' middle class kids got given The Eagle, with informative pull-outs and good PC stories, like Dan Dare, a very British hero.

    One great thing about comics is that one person, or maybe a writer and an artist, can produce them, get them printed and distribute them without all the restrictions and requirements of a major publisher. Independence is a great asset to a good storyteller. It makes me think that self published authors could do a lot worse than emulating Mark Twain when he started out and go round selling their book door to door.
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  2. #52
    Quote Originally Posted by Olly Buckle View Post
    The comics of my childhood were a bit different, The Beano, The Dandy. I guess that we saw American comics, but Americans never saw the British ones. We had characters like The Bash Street Kids, a class where the overweight boy was called 'Fatty' and the ugly one 'Plug', no-one would dare do that nowadays, and 'Lord Snooty' and his pals, Roger the dodger and Minny the minx, they seemed much more varied and fun than superheroes. They started before my time as a supplement attached to newspapers, then became independent. 'Nice' middle class kids got given The Eagle, with informative pull-outs and good PC stories, like Dan Dare, a very British hero.
    Yes, I loved those Bash Street Kids stories, and I remember one class we had where we were probably just as disruptive. Funnily enough, I can't recall the specifics of any of those stories now.
    These days I'm more like Colonel Blink the short-sighted gink.


  3. #53
    Quote Originally Posted by Terry D View Post
    A distinction without a difference.
    Within the context the remark was made, I disagree.

    I was asked if a swordsman and an old man mentor would make me think of Luke and Obi or Arthur and Merlin. I said "neither" and gave my reasons. Because a lightsaber is fictional, I wouldn't think of it when someone says "sword". Regardless of whether you consider a light saber to be a sword or not, some do and some don't, I, personally, would not think of one when asked about a sword. Nor would I think about any other fictional weapon, like the Klingon bat'leth, so it's not a bias against Star Wars.

  4. #54
    Quote Originally Posted by Guard Dog View Post
    Idealism is fine, but it's never won the first battle against reality.
    Gandhi, Alexander Hamilton, Martin Luther King, Susan B. Anthony, Albert Schweitzer, Jesus, Eleanor Roosevelt, and many others would disagree with you.
    “Fools” said I, “You do not know
    Silence like a cancer grows
    Hear my words that I might teach you
    Take my arms that I might reach you”
    But my words like silent raindrops fell
    And echoed in the wells of silence : Simon & Garfunkel


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  5. #55
    Quote Originally Posted by Kyle R View Post
    I'll check it out, thanks.

    I remember seeing those characters make an appearance in comic form (can't remember if their appearance was in Spider-Man or Silver Surfer), though I've never actually read their storyline.
    That would be Spider-Man. Cloak & Dagger premiered in Peter Parker, Spectacular Spider-Man #64. They've since gone on to have their own mini-series and many appearances throughout Marvel.

  6. #56
    Quote Originally Posted by Guard Dog View Post
    Do you have any idea how much of an oddity I am around these forums, simply because I'm only here to learn how to write better, technically? So that I can write down a story I put together over more than 30 years? Hm?

    My interest in writing is not money-based. I have no interest in being published.

    I'm also not concerned with the 'Average Reader'.

    I'm doing what I am strictly for myself, not for some market or the other.
    Just about everybody who is here is here to 'learn how to write better, technically'. Commercial success with having people like your work is not incompatible with that. With few exceptions, it is the opposite.

    Anyway, regarding the OP: I gave my views on the concept of 'superheroes' in the other thread. I acknowledge those are just my views, however, and always try to see these things from other reader's perspectives. So with that in mind...

    It's not so much that I think superheroes aren't worth exploring. It's just that I don't see anything in the existing genre that suggests that they are. Not as far as addressing the human condition. Most of them don't tackle 'real world' issues a whole lot and when they attempt to (as they increasingly do now) I don't find their take to be original. And therefore, not credible.

    I really tried to get into Batman when The Dark Knight was all the rage. I bought the comics, old and new. I tried to get into the space as I would anything I read.

    And what I got out of it was: 'Fuck This Guy'.

    What I saw was an Ayn Randian industrial tycoon who was good-looking and filthy rich, highly materialistic, successful romantically, who indulges in moonlit vigilantism. Either as a hobby or for his own personal ends depending on how you read it.

    This is not a character who exists nor can exist in our world. There's almost no instance I can think of where looking at the world through the imagined perspective of Batman (or his allies, or his adversaries for that matter) makes sense.

    People get very defensive about superheroes not being shallow or whatever. Fine, but then I need to know what are the lessons you are learning from it? What does Batman (or whoever) represent that is proprietary? How is his personality more interesting than Bill Gates's or Al Gore's? Both are rich white guys 'fighting injustice' Why is Batman a more captivating character than Al Gore, besides being more violent and better dressed?

    We can make the case that not all writing needs to be 'intellectual'.I won't argue on that. I agree with it. There are plenty of books I've enjoyed like that. But in those cases I will either (A) Not try to defend them as being important pieces of literature or (B) Have discovered something else about the story that provides the relevance. Maybe the setting or the event or something else.

    I could somewhat get interested in the philosophical issues of genetic mutation present in X Men and how this can relate to real world issues of bigotry or homophobia - and in fairness Marvel does dabble. But I'm not sure it really advances any original ideas on the topic nor holds the issue to its core. It's not Philadelphia. The idea is simple, just that 'discrimination is bad'. If that's the extent to which the superhero world wants to engage with political ideas color me underwhelmed.

    Of course maybe I'm just reading the wrong stuff....but you don't get to tell me that without telling me what I should be reading.
    Last edited by luckyscars; February 15th, 2019 at 06:47 AM.
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