Should I use colors as codenames for my villains? - Page 5

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Thread: Should I use colors as codenames for my villains?

  1. #41
    Member Guard Dog's Avatar
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    Damn... Now I'm considering starting a thread on what people think is the most politically powerful religious organization these days, just to take some of the heat off'a 'Pony...

    ...that and asking how long people think it'll be before religion as such is extinct.

    I figure either of those two should be good for a few rounds of distractions.

    They'd certainly give folks something to write about.





    G.D.
    Leave it be and it won't bother you.
    Screw with it, and it'll eat you alive.

    Soon enough, nations will play second fiddle to corporations.

    "The world is not what we wish it to be; it is what it is."
    "Freedom is the value, not protection."

  2. #42
    In a century they will be teaching religion right alongside Greek mythology.
    They're both of about the same relevancy.

  3. #43
    ...and I am gonna laugh soooo loud when Pony sells his screenplay for a million bucks using all the cheeky suggestions he got from this forum.

  4. #44
    Quote Originally Posted by ironpony View Post
    Oh okay, thanks. Well they are the villains, so they are expected to be evildoers that need to be stopped, or so that is what I intended.
    I haven't read your work but the fact you are speaking of rape as a plot device, a kind of literary steroid, simply to level up "super evil", and considering giving the gangsters ostensibly "cool" nicknames to boot...indicates you probably aren't coming at a subject like sexual violence from a particularly thoughtful standpoint. That's not a slight on you really. Most writers would struggle with it, which is why most avoid it.

    Do what you want but it will probably backfire. IMO the kind of audience who typically enjoys action novels (young, mainly male) doesn't need any more gratuitous rape in their fiction.
    "If you don't like my peaches, don't shake my tree."

  5. #45
    Pony: Don't listen to any of that stuff. If you wanna write anything worth a damn then you need to swing for the fences. Don't write a book the way any of us [hacks] would write it; write something entirely new. Shock, scare, thrill, but don't write ANYTHING predictable enough to be suggested in a writing forum.

    So drink a pot of crack-laced coffee and sit down and write that book like a sociopath. Damn the torpedoes, write that book without regard for what anyone is gonna think. Don't write safe, write big.

  6. #46
    Okay, well I don't think I was using rape a mere plot device to kick start things off. The detective is developed through his experiences with the crimes in the case, so I think it helps the main character through an arc so to speak, at least that is what I intended. Plus I feel there are themes that are explored from the crimes, rather than having it be just a plot device to kick things off.

    But if it is being used merely as a plot device, isn't that kind of a double standard since horrible crimes are used as plot devices all the time? Murder is used as plot device is many crime stories as well as serial killer stories. Law and Order: SVU has sex crimes in their cases, and I don't think I have gone much further than that show has. Even mass murder acts of terrorism have been used as plot devices, so I feel that I haven't really pushed the boundaries compared to other serious stories though, unless I am and I'm not seeing the distinction.

  7. #47
    Quote Originally Posted by Ralph Rotten View Post
    Pony: Don't listen to any of that stuff. If you wanna write anything worth a damn then you need to swing for the fences. Don't write a book the way any of us [hacks] would write it; write something entirely new. Shock, scare, thrill, but don't write ANYTHING predictable enough to be suggested in a writing forum.

    So drink a pot of crack-laced coffee and sit down and write that book like a sociopath. Damn the torpedoes, write that book without regard for what anyone is gonna think. Don't write safe, write big.
    Because writing about a code-named gang that goes around raping women for no other reason other than "because they're evildoers" isn't in the least bit predictable, right?

    Quote Originally Posted by ironpony View Post
    Okay, well I don't think I was using rape a mere plot device to kick start things off. The detective is developed through his experiences with the crimes in the case, so I think it helps the main character through an arc so to speak, at least that is what I intended. Plus I feel there are themes that are explored from the crimes, rather than having it be just a plot device to kick things off.
    "A plot device, or plot mechanism, is any technique in a narrative used to move the plot forward"

    In this case the actual mechanism sounds like a good guy vs bad guy, only you are using rape as the motivation for the bad guy. Which has been done to death and seldom well IMO.

    Quote Originally Posted by ironpony View Post
    But if it is being used merely as a plot device, isn't that kind of a double standard since horrible crimes are used as plot devices all the time? Murder is used as plot device is many crime stories as well as serial killer stories. Law and Order: SVU has sex crimes in their cases, and I don't think I have gone much further than that show has. Even mass murder acts of terrorism have been used as plot devices, so I feel that I haven't really pushed the boundaries compared to other serious stories though, unless I am and I'm not seeing the distinction.
    You have the ghost of a point in the sense that society does have a double standard when it comes to a sexual assault versus, say, just getting beaten up. You want to argue that I'm not going to defend it. I don't really care. All I'm saying is that its not terribly shocking or original anymore (unless you're Ralph I guess). You just named one of a bazillion examples of "hero cop tracking down insatiable rapist(s)" plot.

    And it's okay. You don't have to be original. You can make it work. I'm just saying it is risky and the backlash for not handling it properly tends to be more severe because, well, there are a lot of real life sexual assault victims around. Codenaming the guys after different types of fruit or whatever may not be a good idea. Then again, what do I know? Just a hack.
    "If you don't like my peaches, don't shake my tree."

  8. #48
    Well they have their reasons though, at least I intended them too. Do the codenames make any difference now that I have explained what they are up to?

  9. #49
    Whatever you eventually use for code names may not relevant at this stage, especially if it's delaying the writing.
    I suggest using pretty much anything for now (placeholders), preferably some daft words that won't appear elsewhere in the text. When you have finished the story, you can do 'search and replace' on those words in your word processor so can insert the names without going through the text manually.
    If you have written in such a manner that the names help a sentence flow more readily, maybe pick names that have the same syllable count as your placeholders.
    The important thing at this stage (probably) is to not let the naming convention delay the rest of the story.


  10. #50
    Mentor Dluuni's Avatar
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    After asking a question, please do not argue that the answer you got in response is wrong. It is incredibly frustrating.

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