Slavery 19th Century - Page 3

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  1. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by Guard Dog View Post
    ( I'm 1/8th Lakota Sioux and 1/8th Cherokee. It was probably that first bunch that wanted to give you folks a haircut. )


    G.D.
    So great grandparents, right?

  2. #22
    I am Native American... I was born here.
    God hates a coward Revelation 21:8

    “Good writin' ain't necessarily good readin'.”

    Hidden Content ,

    To encourage and facilitate "me"

  3. #23
    Here's some videos on slavery and/or the Civil War that has some interesting points to consider or research more.

    Slavery's scar
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=QAlWqi...jK3o3GoZ_6k9kB

    10 myths
    https://m.youtube.com/#/watch?v=R1FO9MqWugY

    Slave rebellions
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=xV8xGf...9NrUzN7TqEc%3D

    African tribes taken into slavery
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=r8PCd1...9NrUzN7TqEc%3D

  4. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by Plasticweld View Post
    I am Native American... I was born here.

    According to Dad's DNA test, he is 20% Apache, so I am logically...10%?
    It explains why I don't sun burn.

  5. #25
    As most have written, there was not much difference between the North and South on the issue of slavery. George Washington, Thomas Jefferson and Andrew Jackson were all slave owners. And Lincoln introduced the notion that emancipation and equality were not the same thing. Later, Rutherford B. Hayes pulled federal troops out of the South, effectively ending Reconstruction, as part of a bargain he struck to win a closely contested tested election.

    The only notable contrast was in the psyche and sentiment of the two sides after the Civil War, but neither of these took aim at the institution of slavery. Both tales were equally mythical. The North was not as progressive as they portrayed, as others have noted, and the South introduced a new narrative, based on a righteous defense of an imperiled Southern heritage.

    The repercussions of all this lasted, as Guard Dog noted, for the next century.
    Last edited by Wgrondzil; January 6th, 2019 at 06:54 PM. Reason: corrected tense

  6. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by Wgrondzil View Post
    As most have written, there was not much difference between the North and South on the issue of slavery. George Washington, Thomas Jefferson and Andrew Jackson were all slave owners. And Lincoln introduced the notion that emancipation and equality were not the same thing. Later, Rutherford B. Hayes pulled federal troops out of the South, effectively ending Reconstruction, as part of a bargain he struck to win a closely contested tested election.

    The only notable contrast was in the psyche and sentiment of the two sides after the Civil War, but neither of these took aim at the institution of slavery. Both tales were equally mythical. The North was not as progressive as they portrayed, as others have noted, and the South introduced a new narrative, based on a righteous defense of an imperiled Southern heritage.

    The repercussions of all this lasted, as Guard Dog noted, for the next century.


    There is a flaw in the evidence provided that is supposed to support the claim that there was little difference between the North and the South. The three presidents mentioned lived, according to both my recollection and Wikipedia --

    Mount Vernon was the plantation of George Washington, the first President of the United States, and his wife, Martha Dandridge Custis Washington. The estate is situated on the banks of the Potomac River in Fairfax County, Virginia, near Alexandria, across from Prince George's County, Maryland.
    Monticello (mon-tee-CHEL-oh) was the primary plantation of Thomas Jefferson, the third President of the United States, who began designing and building Monticello at age 26 after inheriting land from his father. Located just outside Charlottesville, Virginia, in the Piedmont region, the plantation was originally 5,000 acres (20 km 2 ), with Jefferson using slaves for extensive cultivation of tobacco and mixed crops, later shifting from tobacco cultivation to wheat in response to changing markets.
    The Hermitage is a historical plantation and museum located in Davidson County, Tennessee, United States, 10 miles (16 km) east of downtown Nashville. The plantation was owned by Andrew Jackson, the seventh President of the United States, from 1804 until his death at the Hermitage in 1845. Jackson only lived at the property occasionally until he retired from public life in 1837.
    All three lived below the Mason Dixon line. In other words, they were from the South. So the owning of slaves by Southerners is supported, but the examples don't demonstrate what was going on in the North.

    And Lincoln pointing out that there's a difference between emancipation and equally doesn't support the claim, either. There IS a difference. But so what? Before there could be equality, or even the attempt of equality, there had to be an end of slavery.

    Post Civil War happenings, while interesting, are probably better suited for a separate thread, as the OP was asking about slavery.

  7. #27
    Post civil war happenings are interesting, precisely because they do entail perspectives of slavery at the time. A good source for the contrast between what we assume, and the zeitgeist of the day about slavery can be found in Jon Meacham’s work, the Soul of America:

    Yet the war was not as morally dispositive as we tend—or like—to think. “The Union,” the historian C. Vann Woodward wrote, “fought the Civil War on borrowed moral capital.” To accept emancipation did not mean one favored equality. Lincoln himself was forever evolving on the question. “Your race are suffering, in my judgment, the greatest wrong inflicted on any people,” Lincoln told a delegation of blacks in August 1862. “But even when you cease to be slaves, you are yet far removed from being placed on an equality with the white race…. I do not propose to discuss this, but to present it as a fact with which we have to deal. I cannot alter it if I would.” One answer, Lincoln allowed, was the removal of blacks from the nation—colonization to Africa, perhaps. “But for your race among us there could not be war, although many men engaged on either side do not care for you one way or the other…. It is better for us both, therefore, be separated.”

    Also, the biography of Sojourner Truth is an eye opener for those who might assume that there was a greater share of benevolence on the part of the North regarding treatment of their slaves.


  8. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by NicaNieves View Post
    1820-30s Boston Massachusetts. What would one witness in terms of the interaction between African Americans and Whites in that time? I know there were blacks who were born free in the north. But for example, if a seventeen year old girl who has spent the entirety of her life in the north suddenly takes a trip to the Deep South she would encounter slavery at its roots as opposed to....(back home)
    That’s what I’m struggling with. Can someone paint a picture of what specifically the north was like during those years. Accuracy is important to me. Thanks!
    Quote Originally Posted by Wgrondzil View Post
    Post civil war happenings are interesting, precisely because they do entail perspectives of slavery at the time. A good source for the contrast between what we assume, and the zeitgeist of the day about slavery can be found in Jon Meacham’s work, the Soul of America:

    Yet the war was not as morally dispositive as we tend—or like—to think. “The Union,” the historian C. Vann Woodward wrote, “fought the Civil War on borrowed moral capital.” To accept emancipation did not mean one favored equality. Lincoln himself was forever evolving on the question. “Your race are suffering, in my judgment, the greatest wrong inflicted on any people,” Lincoln told a delegation of blacks in August 1862. “But even when you cease to be slaves, you are yet far removed from being placed on an equality with the white race…. I do not propose to discuss this, but to present it as a fact with which we have to deal. I cannot alter it if I would.” One answer, Lincoln allowed, was the removal of blacks from the nation—colonization to Africa, perhaps. “But for your race among us there could not be war, although many men engaged on either side do not care for you one way or the other…. It is better for us both, therefore, be separated.”

    Also, the biography of Sojourner Truth is an eye opener for those who might assume that there was a greater share of benevolence on the part of the North regarding treatment of their slaves.

    The American Civil War was a war fought in the United States from 1861 to 1865. The Civil War is the most studied and written about episode in U.S. history. Wikipedia
    As you can see, the OP is looking for specific information (slavery and blacks in Boston, Mass) from a specific time frame (1820-1839). While the issues of slavery and equality thirty to fifty years later are interesting, they are not relevant to the OP. That's why I say such a discussion probably belongs in a separate thread.

    You have mentioned slaves in the North. Is there any written documentation that there were Northerners who owned slaves? I'm not talking about Southerners who were temporarily in the North. And keep in mind that Washington, Jefferson and most of the early presidents were Southerners.

  9. #29
    Member Guard Dog's Avatar
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    When Did Slavery Really End in the North?

    The Mason-Dixon line, for anyone that's interested:
    Click image for larger version. 

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    G.D.
    Leave it be and it won't bother you.
    Screw with it, and it'll eat you alive.

    "The world is not what we wish it to be; it is what it is."
    "Freedom is the value, not protection."

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