The Climactic Ending - Page 4

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  1. #31
    Yup! One simple way of looking at it:

    The climax resolves the main story conflict.

    The denouement resolves (or intentionally doesn't​ resolve) everything else.

  2. #32
    I don't like an ending that is expected. I respect a writer who gives their writers what they need, not what they want. And sometimes I love the opposite. But honestly, if a book is well written and doesn't completely suck then I have no issue with it.
    Write what you feel, say what you want to say, paint that picture, and move on! Don't apologize.

  3. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by NicaNieves View Post
    I respect a writer who gives their writers what they need, not what they want.
    In the context of fiction what is the difference between what a reader wants and what a reader needs? And how do you know?
    "All good books have one thing in common - they are truer than if they had really happened."

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  4. #34
    Quote Originally Posted by luckyscars View Post
    In the context of fiction what is the difference between what a reader wants and what a reader needs? And how do you know?
    I think a more accurate way of phrasing what NicaNieves was saying is the difference between what the reader expects, and what the story needs -- but I might be misinterpreting the intent.
    “Fools” said I, “You do not know
    Silence like a cancer grows
    Hear my words that I might teach you
    Take my arms that I might reach you”
    But my words like silent raindrops fell
    And echoed in the wells of silence : Simon & Garfunkel


    Those who enjoy stirring the chamber-pot should be required to lick the spoon.

    Our job as writers is to make readers dream, to infiltrate their minds with our words and create a new reality; a reality not theirs, and not ours, but a new, unique combination of both.

    Visit Amazon and the Kindle Store to check out Reflections in a Black Mirror, and Chase

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  5. #35
    Wɾ¡ʇ¡∩9 bdcharles's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EmmaSohan View Post
    Sooner or later, you have to write a climactic ending. Luke Skywalker destroying the Death Star. Dorothy killing the wicked witch. James Bond saving the world (again).

    What do you like to put in your endings? What do you like or not like in the endings you read (or see?)?

    I have about four things I want to suggest, and there's some standard answers too, but I think there's maybe a lot of possible answers to this so-important question.
    Physically I like to invoke alot of sensory stuff in my endings - sight, sound, speed, a sense of motion. Emotionally there must be alot of trauma.




    Beauty is nothing but the beginning of terror which we are barely able to endure, and are awed,
    because it serenely disdains to annihilate us.
    - Rainer Maria Rilke, "Elegy I"

    *

    Is this fire, or is this mask?
    It's the Mantasy!
    - Anonymous

    *

    C'mon everybody, don't need this crap.
    - Wham!





  6. #36
    there seems to be a confusion here, between the climax and the resolution -

    Bond kills the villain - but is later damned with faint praise for being unconventional.
    Dorothy kills the witch - but then goes home where she better appreciates her family and friends.

    that's the trick.....
    find the sublime within the murk
    then throw in a rhyme to make it work

  7. #37
    Member Moonbeast32's Avatar
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    I like it when books give you a clear idea of where the climax will take place, but gives you no clue as ti why that place or time is important, and what exactly will hapen there. I've been binging Robert Jordan as of late, and I've noticed he employs that technique in most of his books.
    Oh say, what is truth? 'Tis the fairest gem
    That the riches of worlds can produce,
    And priceless the value of truth will be when
    The proud monarch's costliest diadem
    Is counted but dross and refuse.

  8. #38
    I wanted to add one more idea, though now don't know how to say it. In the first Star Wars movie, everything is going according to plan, then he turns off the automatic targeting and instead decides to go with the force. That's an amazing moment.

    It's not the climactic moment (destroying the Death Star), it comes before. The usually trope is that at the last second something goes wrong with the plan, but this is completely the opposite. I don't know what viewers make of Luke's strategy -- it increases the chance of succeeding? Decreases?

    If I return to my sportscaster trying to turn the football game into a "story", it's kind of like finding a turning point. They idea is to look if your ending has one of these, or could usually have one. It adds structure.

    In one of of my stories, they go back and forth in their battle with the witch, then

    ... the witch's eyes widened in fright and

    she panicked.
    There's still a struggle, but that was like the turning point, and I gave it a lot of weight.
    Latest writing advice: Hidden Content .

  9. #39
    Quote Originally Posted by EmmaSohan View Post
    I wanted to add one more idea, though now don't know how to say it. In the first Star Wars movie, everything is going according to plan, then he turns off the automatic targeting and instead decides to go with the force. That's an amazing moment.

    It's not the climactic moment (destroying the Death Star), it comes before. The usually trope is that at the last second something goes wrong with the plan, but this is completely the opposite. I don't know what viewers make of Luke's strategy -- it increases the chance of succeeding? Decreases?

    If I return to my sportscaster trying to turn the football game into a "story", it's kind of like finding a turning point. They idea is to look if your ending has one of these, or could usually have one. It adds structure.

    In one of of my stories, they go back and forth in their battle with the witch, then



    There's still a struggle, but that was like the turning point, and I gave it a lot of weight.
    But something has gone wrong with the plan. Luke's first attempt to bomb the vent using the targeting computer failed. He only has one chance left (which increases the tension) and in that moment he truly accepts the force and chooses to trust in it. That's the basic change that Luke goes through on his journey. It could be argued that that moment is the story's true climax, everything else is just window dressing.
    “Fools” said I, “You do not know
    Silence like a cancer grows
    Hear my words that I might teach you
    Take my arms that I might reach you”
    But my words like silent raindrops fell
    And echoed in the wells of silence : Simon & Garfunkel


    Those who enjoy stirring the chamber-pot should be required to lick the spoon.

    Our job as writers is to make readers dream, to infiltrate their minds with our words and create a new reality; a reality not theirs, and not ours, but a new, unique combination of both.

    Visit Amazon and the Kindle Store to check out Reflections in a Black Mirror, and Chase

    Hidden Content






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