This is going to sound silly but..

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  1. #1

    This is going to sound silly but..

    ...Can anybody explain the erotica genre minus the sex part? Or point one out? I mean, the sex is obvious. It's doing a lot of heavy lifting in at least some of the pieces. But I feel like there's a whole lot of quirky conventions and strangeness that I keep crashing into face first that are completely bewildering. I haven't quite sorted out what kind of tropes are being used to structure them, or WHY they are there like that.

  2. #2
    I think explaining erotica minus sex would be like explaining horror minus scary stuff or romance minus love. There's not a whole lot left to work with...

    Is there something specific you're struggling with?

  3. #3
    Well, yes. I'm a little bit hazy on the structures and tropes that lead to the sex. I get a definite impression that there are some accepted conventions and beats and form there, but the pieces that I have looked at just looked stylized to me. This is made particularly glaring by me being TG then seeing the tropes and conventions associated with that. As mentioned, it looks extremely strange to me.

  4. #4
    Analogy: I have noticed that "horror" has what could perhaps be called "tropes". They were difficult for me to find. For example, the start is a seemingless innocuous event that serves as the trigger, such as a flat tire at night in the middle of nowhere with a hotel near by. Unlike the traditional epilogue, which ties up loose ends, a horror story epilogue usually creates a new horror.

    So, I can only think of a few "tropes" for erotica, and they probably aren't what you are thinking. One is that things escalate, starting small and inching forward. (I am no fan of inching.) Unless you mean literary erotica, the progression is usually fast. There seems to be a high tolerance for implausibility.

    It has to sort itself into sub-genres by type of erotic interest, so the reader usually can tell what is going to happen from the start. The details you add for realism should be sexual. And to say the obvious, it is directed towards a particular erotic interest.

    Can you explain more of that you meant? I am interested.
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  5. #5
    In simplest form, I imagine you're basically trying to write the human connection. Essentially that's what erotica is, the idea/pleasure of sex is something that all humans share fundamentally so what you're trying to capture is exactly that only in written form. You're trying to capture the feeling we get from the rush of an intimate encounter. If the question is how to write it, I'd suggest basing it off your own experiences/fantasies etc.

  6. #6
    Well... Almost all people. I hang out with too many repulsed aces to think of wanting sex as a universal. And, I know that I perceive this experience a bit differently than most of the people who might be reading, so it is a bit of a issue for me to figure out how to translate it all in.

    So far, I end up relying heavily on outlines and checklists and things like that, so on this, I am maybe analyzing it a bit much. But, I have my reasons for doing it. After all, I have to be able to fit my writing into one of the genres mentioned.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dluuni View Post
    . After all, I have to be able to fit my writing into one of the genres mentioned.
    Okay, don't take this wrong, but... Do you? Why?

    I've basically labeled what I'm working on "Sci-Fy/Fantasy", because I'm sure that's what most people will see it as, and where it probably fits best. BUT... it's got horror, romance, action/adventure, mythology, religious explorations, a fair bit of "conspiracy theory brought to life" and a crap-load of other things I'm probably forgetting. But when it all comes right down to it, it's just a story about a collection of people and how they interact, when it comes right down to it.

    And as Ralph Rotten said ( Or maybe it was Moderan... I'm not certain at the moment. ) on another thread, there are no "Genre Police" gonna come bust anybody for breaking the rules.

    I guess what I'm tryin' to say is just write your story(ies) the way you want and that doesn't give you a migraine, and don't worry too much about where they fit. They'll sort themselves out in time, I'm sure. Or get sorted by the people who like them.



    G.D.
    Let me be painfully clear: I do not know what the hell I'm doing with this writing thing.
    And if I suddenly start acting like I do, would somebody please punch me in the head?
    Thanks.
    G.D.

    "The world is not what we wish it to be; it is what it is."

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