Publishers. They confuse me..... - Page 2

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  1. #11
    If a publisher is accepting your submission without an agent, you should be grateful that they are even considering your work. Most publishers who do accept unagented submissions are small presses with very little staff and they all get many, many, many submissions. It wouldn't be feasible to offer feedback.

  2. #12
    It seemed like the books I could summarize easily sold better than books I had difficulty describing.
    It's all about the jacket text.

  3. #13
    Member Guard Dog's Avatar
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    J.J., is the stuff you're submitting one of those stories that use DC comic characters in there?

    Because if it is, that could possibly be the source of your problem.

    After all, writing fan fiction is one thing, but what a publisher can or will touch is another.



    G.D>
    Let me be painfully clear: I do not know what the hell I'm doing with this writing thing.
    And if I suddenly start acting like I do, would somebody please punch me in the head?
    Thanks.
    G.D.

    "The world is not what we wish it to be; it is what it is."

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by JJBuchholz View Post
    I've received two more rejections from publishers today, and nothing ever makes any sense.
    I've been rejected by publishers several times over the course of the year, and they always
    send me a short paragraph telling me they can't use my work, or say that "It's not what we're
    looking for" and little else.

    Publishers never seem to talk about the WHY they won't use my work, and it's left me confused,
    sad, angry, and pissed off at the same time. How hard can it be for them to briefly explain why
    they don't want my work? If I'm doing something wrong, how in the hell can I learn if I don't
    know what the issue is?

    Is this common amongst publishers? Is it due to the fact that they are overly picky?

    I need answers, and I don't get any from them no matter what I do!

    -JJB
    I can think of a few possible explanations:

    1) Your submission doesn't match the kind of stories they publish.

    This one's relatively easy to remedy: just familiarize yourself with the publisher's usual content. If you're submitting Urban Fantasy to a publisher that specializes in Women's Fiction, for example, you're bound to get a swift rejection.

    2) Your submission doesn't match their submission guidelines.

    This one's a big one and clearly the easiest to fix. Make sure you read their submission guidelines thoroughly. Then reread them. Then, reread them again. Your submission should look like their dream submission, at least in terms of presentation. If it doesn't, you're not trying hard enough.

    3) Your story simply doesn't float their boat.

    This is the hardest one to remedy, and the most jagged of pills to swallow. Whoever received your submission may have simply read what they could of it—and found that the writing just didn't do it for them. And that's okay. Rejections are to be expected. If you're not getting rejected, you're not submitting enough. Fiction is a personal preference kind of thing—what one reader likes, another will probably hate.

    The tough part about submitting is that it's not about having a great story that everyone will love (that story doesn't exist, sorry). It's about finding the right fit. Finding the publisher who has an itch for the exact kind of story that you write.

    If you're confident in your story, then your best bet is to continue to shop the story around while you work on your next one.

    If you're unsure, you might want to take a step back from the edge of submitting and get some reader input. There might be issues in the story that could be caught by fresh pairs of eyes. Plus, then you're guaranteed some proper feedback.

    Best of luck!

  5. #15
    A synopsis has a writing structure. Protagonist 1's name, personalizing feature, story link, rising action. (P2's...) Main threat. Cliffhanger.
    "Missy is a cute kitty. Missy's big claws aren't as cute. But sometimes, being a good kitty isn't about being cute...
    In a land where fluffy love and adoration is the way of life, scary monsters threaten everyone. Can Missy keep Happy Land from turning into Scary Land?"
    Last edited by Dluuni; Yesterday at 06:41 PM.

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