New cover design - Page 2

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  1. #11

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Ralph Rotten View Post
    I am aiming at almost a 60ish sci-fi magazine look. So it is supposed to look a look a little cartoonish.

    Underexposed? I do not understand Master Yoda?
    The shadowing looks like underexposed film. The whole thing is way busy for my tastes. Just imo.





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  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Ralph Rotten View Post
    How does this do?
    Not liking the white background on the spine and back. The front cover still has some of the same issues it had before. The author name seems a bit better, though.

  4. #14
    This is a rough sketch showing the direction I would take on this cover.

    I would emphasize the word "GRAVITY" because that relates to the image better than anything else. The visual emphasis of the whole design is centered on GRAVITY and the floating ship, creating a visual one-two punch that demands attention. The people below are in muted colors so as not to distract from the main emphasis.

    If I were doing this cover, I would create the whole illustration at once using the same style for every element so that it remained an integrated composition. Doing this would avoid the problem I mentioned earlier about different styles slapped together.

    The font is more action-oriented and "sci-fi" in my view, but fonts can be pretty subjective, and this is simply my preference.

    It's not perfect, but it's a pretty good start and resolves many of the issues I pointed out earlier.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Also, I eliminated the helicopter just because I was in a hurry, but it could be layered in front of the ship to give it a sense of scale. I'd also play around with the size of the spectators to see if they can be smaller, which could make the scale seem even bigger.

    As I look at it, I'm beginning to think the people in the scene are irrelevant (just like gravity! ha!) and the image would be more powerful and visually arresting without any other distractions.

    Just my thoughts. That's the point of roughs: to see and consider options.
    Last edited by sigmadog; October 8th, 2018 at 11:34 PM.


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  5. #15
    I agree with much that has already been written about the artwork but feel that the weakness actually lies in the title. I appreciate that it reflects titles from the 1950's and 60's, especially The Day The Earth Stood Still to my mind, but it does present problems in the artwork as has already been mentioned. I think the key issue may be with the words "became irrelevant", which are long but not particularly strong. If you look at the assorted artwork for The Day The Earth Stood Still you'll see that the title was usually written with all the words in the same font size and the fact that they were all roughly the same length aided the layout. In some cases prominence was given to the words "Earth Stood Still" because they embodied the main plotline.

    I suggest reviewing your title. Given that you mention potential killing in your plot blurb perhaps you should consider bringing this motif into the title, making it "The Day Gravity Was Killed". Gravity was still relevant after all but could now be killed off selectively, just as the process's originators could be. This means that the words "Gravity Was Killed" can be emphasised in the artwork to provide the main theme and add a sense of threat not present in the words "became irrelevant". Also the words are shorter, giving more scope in the layout. Choose something like that anyway.
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  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by moderan View Post
    The shadowing looks like underexposed film. The whole thing is way busy for my tastes. Just imo.

    You think I should lighten it? It is kinda dark, especially when it thumbnails.
    I'll brighten it a tad.

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by sigmadog View Post

    I would emphasize the word "GRAVITY" because that relates to the image better than anything else. The visual emphasis of the whole design is centered on GRAVITY and the floating ship, creating a visual one-two punch that demands attention.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Gravity_comp.jpg 
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ID:	22815

    I like how you created the banner along the top. It does stand out, and the color screams 1960s dime magazine.

  8. #18
    Member Sir-KP's Avatar
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    IMO the painting needs to be in hyper realistic, that's first and the hardest part. The focus needs to be at, in this case, the floating cruise ship and a sea.

    Secondly, a couple of humans posing and having facial expression of despair. LOL. That's basically what I see from 70's disaster movie posters.

    Remove that blurry drop shadow. If you still needs it later on, make it solid and closer to the text.

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