Indies United Publishing House - Page 3


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Thread: Indies United Publishing House

  1. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by Bayview View Post

    So, challenges I see for self-publishers:
    - having a financial model that gives a profit after paying for professional covers/editing, giving a 55% discount, and allowing for returns;
    - producing books that are written to the standard expected by book stores;
    - convincing bookstores that it makes sense to break their usual patterns of ordering from the expected publishers in order to take a chance on an unknown.
    So, pull yourself up by the bootstraps while standing on your head.

    Professional-quality work is demeaned by the presence of so many people that are not and never will be professionals. Every kunox makes it that much harder for a Ralph Rotten to be seen and taken seriously.
    Networking is the answer, I think. In-genre if you're niche. Some of the best-known writers in my subgenera work at publishing houses or own/work at bookstores. It's no accident that they know more about the publishing business than others do. Standing next to them gets you some of that limelight. Talking/interacting gets you education.
    Horror is trying to escape the publishing (big five litfic) ghetto, riding on the shoulders of dark fantasy and YA grimdark, which are big these days. There's shelf-space to be had. But you have to dumb down in order to do it. A writer like Paul Tremblay had to turn in A Head Full of Ghosts, which is the Exorcist told from the pov of a tween, in order to get a mass audience, and his publisher got a blurb from S King to help. Is that selling out? Of course it is. And just about anyone would do it, given the opportunity.
    That avenue isn't available to indies/self-pubs. But the model is still there.
    Hidden Content
    "From the moment I picked your book up until I laid it down, I was convulsed with laughter. Someday I intend reading it." - Groucho Marx

  2. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by Bayview View Post
    I think self-publishers can get their books into at least some local bookstores just by approaching/lobbying/nagging management, but if you're talking about larger-scale distribution...

    Bookstores expect a 55% discount and they expect books to be returnable if they don't sell. And they want books they think will sell easily, so that means professional covers/editing, probably a recognizable and successful genre, etc. But also, they want to be marketed to.

    One of the most exciting parts of having a deal with a Big 5 publisher was seeing my book in the marketing material they send to bookstores every month. A half-page ad, right across from a full-page ad for Nora Roberts' new book (!!!). A glossy print brochure, sent every month to every bookstore in the country, with follow-up sales calls from the Penguin sales team.

    Apparently a lot of bookstores just automatically order a couple copies of whatever's in the catalogue from the big publishers (obviously ordering more copies of Nora Roberts or equivalent). It's an established source of books that sell, the glossy brochure and sales calls make it easy to order from them... there's not much thinking required.

    So, challenges I see for self-publishers:
    - having a financial model that gives a profit after paying for professional covers/editing, giving a 55% discount, and allowing for returns;
    - producing books that are written to the standard expected by book stores;
    - convincing bookstores that it makes sense to break their usual patterns of ordering from the expected publishers in order to take a chance on an unknown.

    B&N will sell POD books. You just don't get a display of your book at stores.

  3. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by Jack of all trades View Post
    B&N will sell POD books. You just don't get a display of your book at stores.
    Like, they'll special-order them? Or the reader could go through Amazon. I think it's having the books in stock that leads to sales, most of the time. Browsing is a good sales tool.

  4. #24
    B&N offers their own printing now, but it is a total vanity press system. They stick you with EXPANDED MARKETING FEES on every print book (you cannot deselect the option) so a print book that woulda cost $13 on Amazon will be $19 thru B&N.

  5. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by Bayview View Post

    One of the most exciting parts of having a deal with a Big 5 publisher was seeing my book in the marketing material they send to bookstores every month. A half-page ad, right across from a full-page ad for Nora Roberts' new book (!!!). A glossy print brochure, sent every month to every bookstore in the country, with follow-up sales calls from the Penguin sales team.

    Apparently a lot of bookstores just automatically order a couple copies of whatever's in the catalogue from the big publishers (obviously ordering more copies of Nora Roberts or equivalent). It's an established source of books that sell, the glossy brochure and sales calls make it easy to order from them... there's not much thinking required.


    Maybe that could be a thing for groups like IUPH; get enough writers, put them in a glossy catalog, send to book stores.
    I could see doing something like that. But then I put the shameless in shameless self-promotion.




    "I'd piss on a spark plug if I thought it'd work!"
    General Beringer, WOPR Project

  6. #26
    I read this advice. Seek endorsements of prominent writers to sell your books. In the past I had a few editors follow me on likedin, and even invite me to a chat room once. My advice is to take advantage of these opportunities if you wrote a novel, by having them review it on amazon if possible. We know they care about reputation. I have suggested this idea in the past and it is just a suggestion I came across when reading. ( about publishing short stories)
    I would follow as in believe in the words of good moral leaders. Rather than the beliefs of oneself.
    The most difficult thing for a writer to comprehend is to experience silence, so speak up. (quoted from a member)

  7. #27
    Just an update: IUPH has signed about a dozen writers, we just had an author publish his second novel with IndiesUnited.
    We have a pretty active social media force forming. No one has gotten rich yet, but we have been able to support one another's books.

    If you are interested in Indie publishing, consider talking to Lisa Orban about IndiesUnited.




  8. #28
    I haven't tackled a novel yet but I write short stories so that I can scratch my itch to express my creativity as pip said once (the reason people write was a thread here on the forum which is important for writers).Since I am almost always in a budget crisis since I depend on my father, it is a challenge to write a novel right now since I lack educational opportunities due to some investments which are bad capital but when I do I will have her to contact in mind ( property such as land that is slow to grow in value and to gain an investment). I wanted to be honest since I have dyslexia. I haven't given up my dream. I am more optimistic than last time. I will least have the software. Whether it will enough to write a novel remains to be seen as for a short story that is about 3000 words it takes a decent amount of time to correct. But I hope I do get to become an English mayor so that I can work from home, so it is not an impossible dream or far fetched. Because I experience a lot of anxiety. In short honesty matters and so I will have be patient as I sort out my problems first and to make sure the next thing I write works and that the grammar is correct. Even with the software I need to learn the rules of grammar. I found a book on sentence structure that is written as a general help reference but it is a lot of work. It's not impossible and the kindle fire with a black background and white font makes me feel I can read more easily.I have it but no doctors where I come from are trained in it. Because of language limitations. ( it is a foreign language here) (editing this on a kindle fire)
    Last edited by Theglasshouse; May 19th, 2019 at 01:28 AM.
    I would follow as in believe in the words of good moral leaders. Rather than the beliefs of oneself.
    The most difficult thing for a writer to comprehend is to experience silence, so speak up. (quoted from a member)

  9. #29
    I just wanted to post an update on this experiment known as IndiesUnited.
    We just hit our 1 year anniversary, have more than a dozen writers signed, and now we have hit another milestone:
    Our first #1 book.

    Yep, one of our writers took the #1 position in the Logic-new release category.
    I actually read his book as soon as it came out, and it was quite good. I had a hard time believing he was a first-time author.
    I'm actually a little envious...the best I have been able to do was pull 52nd place in the Humorous SciFi category.


  10. #30
    The joy of "category" best-sellers - the smaller the category, the easier the conquering.

    Still, it's a good marketing tool, maybe.

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