Indies United Publishing House - Page 2


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Thread: Indies United Publishing House

  1. #11
    I agree with Moderan that someone else holding my ISBNs is a deal-breaker. If I'm self-publishing, I'm self-publishing, and I don't see a good reason to give someone else control over my work like that.

    (It helps that ISBNs are free in Canada, but even in the US I think ISBNs would be a minor cost compared to editing and covers and formatting (for those of us who pay for those services).)

  2. #12
    Planet X Publications, the publisher I work for, lets Amazon (or Lulu) ISBNs stand, but that's only for distribution through those channels. ISBNs in the US can be costly unless you buy them in bulk (I do).
    I am part of a loose network of cross-promoters. The people I have published and our fellow writers and readers conspire and post our products on our Facebooks, Twitters, blogs. The trick is to get beyond that network. That's what I need to see here. I don't see anything revolutionary or superior to what I'm already doing...given that numerous members of the loose network are or have been winners of or nominees of WFAs, Stokers, Shirley Jacksons, Philip K Dick awards with wide fanbases of their own.
    If I'm self-publishing, I'm self-publishing, and I don't see a good reason to give someone else control over my work like that.
    Well, shyeah. Ain't that why one (assuming professionalism) self-publishes, to have control over the presentation and content (notwithstanding the general rule, which is that one can't get published otherwise, subject to Sturgeon's Law)?
    Hidden Content
    "From the moment I picked your book up until I laid it down, I was convulsed with laughter. Someday I intend reading it." - Groucho Marx

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by moderan View Post
    Planet X Publications, the publisher I work for, lets Amazon (or Lulu) ISBNs stand, but that's only for distribution through those channels. ISBNs in the US can be costly unless you buy them in bulk (I do).
    I am part of a loose network of cross-promoters. The people I have published and our fellow writers and readers conspire and post our products on our Facebooks, Twitters, blogs. The trick is to get beyond that network. That's what I need to see here. I don't see anything revolutionary or superior to what I'm already doing...given that numerous members of the loose network are or have been winners of or nominees of WFAs, Stokers, Shirley Jacksons, Philip K Dick awards with wide fanbases of their own.


    Well, shyeah. Ain't that why one (assuming professionalism) self-publishes, to have control over the presentation and content (notwithstanding the general rule, which is that one can't get published otherwise, subject to Sturgeon's Law)?


    Well, why didn't ya ever invite me to join your loose association of writers? Now I feel totally left out.


    Seriously, one of the things that made it possible for me to join IUPH was that I had a book standing by, already completed and ready for publication.
    My thinking is "I write lots of books, so no harm in risking one little sci-fi book that may not sell for crap anyhow" (based on my previous sci-fi books.)
    Worst case scenario, it would sell as crappy as the others (I am better at selling post-apocalyptic than sci-fi).

  4. #14
    I did. I explained how to join (just start doing it).

    I'm involved in starting up a publishing house, so it's a longer shot for me, that's all.
    Hidden Content
    "From the moment I picked your book up until I laid it down, I was convulsed with laughter. Someday I intend reading it." - Groucho Marx

  5. #15
    If in the future you do decide to join our merry band of Indies, I can offer you what I offered Ralph Rotten. On the copyright page after using our imprint, you can put on the line below "In association with..." and use the imprint name you've built up. You've spent time, money and effort working on gaining some name recognition, why let those efforts go to waste?

  6. #16
    I suppose, and I thank you for the kind offer. A lot of people need more to learn how to gain entree to bookstores and higher-viewership, more prestige reviewers rather than cross-marketing -- things like getting reviewed by Kirkus or Pub Weekly, for example, how to get into brick-and-mortar stores, that kinda thing. This is really more what I'm looking for from an association or small/indie publisher, and why I'm actively looking for an agent for my longer work.
    That said, I certainly don't see what you're doing as a bad thing, and for someone less advanced, it's a gimme. Good luck.
    Hidden Content
    "From the moment I picked your book up until I laid it down, I was convulsed with laughter. Someday I intend reading it." - Groucho Marx

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by moderan View Post
    I suppose, and I thank you for the kind offer. A lot of people need more to learn how to gain entree to bookstores and higher-viewership, more prestige reviewers rather than cross-marketing -- things like getting reviewed by Kirkus or Pub Weekly, for example, how to get into brick-and-mortar stores, that kinda thing. This is really more what I'm looking for from an association or small/indie publisher, and why I'm actively looking for an agent for my longer work.
    That said, I certainly don't see what you're doing as a bad thing, and for someone less advanced, it's a gimme. Good luck.



    Interesting; I wonder what we'd have to do to get more of our books into brick & mortar stores? What do big publishers do to get their print books into stores like Frys and CVS and Walgreens? To the niche book stores, and B&N?
    Is this something that IUPH could do?

    We're still writing this recipe.

  8. #18
    Well, sir, I don't know. I am imagining a distribution relationship of some kind but what kind of contract results in such is beyond me atm. I've gotten my chapbook into Zia Records and one of the local Bookmans' on consignment.
    Hidden Content
    "From the moment I picked your book up until I laid it down, I was convulsed with laughter. Someday I intend reading it." - Groucho Marx

  9. #19
    I think self-publishers can get their books into at least some local bookstores just by approaching/lobbying/nagging management, but if you're talking about larger-scale distribution...

    Bookstores expect a 55% discount and they expect books to be returnable if they don't sell. And they want books they think will sell easily, so that means professional covers/editing, probably a recognizable and successful genre, etc. But also, they want to be marketed to.

    One of the most exciting parts of having a deal with a Big 5 publisher was seeing my book in the marketing material they send to bookstores every month. A half-page ad, right across from a full-page ad for Nora Roberts' new book (!!!). A glossy print brochure, sent every month to every bookstore in the country, with follow-up sales calls from the Penguin sales team.

    Apparently a lot of bookstores just automatically order a couple copies of whatever's in the catalogue from the big publishers (obviously ordering more copies of Nora Roberts or equivalent). It's an established source of books that sell, the glossy brochure and sales calls make it easy to order from them... there's not much thinking required.

    So, challenges I see for self-publishers:
    - having a financial model that gives a profit after paying for professional covers/editing, giving a 55% discount, and allowing for returns;
    - producing books that are written to the standard expected by book stores;
    - convincing bookstores that it makes sense to break their usual patterns of ordering from the expected publishers in order to take a chance on an unknown.

  10. #20
    The expenses discussed so far :

    Buying a block of ISBNs;

    Paying for professional editing and proofreading;

    Paying for a professional cover design and artwork;

    Paying for reviews by Kirkus and the like.


    With all those expenses, you had better have books that are going to sell well, or you will be publishing at a loss.

    The alternative, of course, is to have in-house talent for the editing, proofreading and art. I guess you could share royalties with them, but they are going to want a return on their investment of time and talent. So, again, you need books that will sell well.

    Recognizing talent and an eye for what will do well in the market seems critical for any publisher, large or small.

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