Anyone know the pro short story markets for dystopia/post-apocalyptic/science fiction


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Thread: Anyone know the pro short story markets for dystopia/post-apocalyptic/science fiction

  1. #1

    Anyone know the pro short story markets for dystopia/post-apocalyptic/science fiction

    Does anyone know the pro short story markets for dystopia/post-apocalyptic/science fiction? I only know one which is lightspeed which likes this subgenre a lot but it is not open this year yet. It is TBA.

    I am thinking the market must say explicitly in their guidelines they like it. Because if not the theme won't fit the magazine or the sub-genre. That decreases the odds of me being picked even though the story might be "decent" or good enough for them.

    I am trying not to spend a lot of money since I need to buy something expensive to help with correcting my stories' English. That I should not spend a lot. Duotrope seems like maybe a choice? Is it that specific when you need an answer as to what market is best for your short story? When you browse it, can you spot the subgenre most likely to be accepted?

    Thanks in advance for any answers. I was thinking anything over 6 cents a word I hope I can find. Or 3 cents a word at least. The length of the short story is 8210 words. Anthologies sometimes are the best picks for long works it seems of this length. But magazines have a bigger reach and audience. But these are much more difficult to be accepted in.

    I don't know if this is the correct section. It, of course, the thread can be moved if it isn't the right one.

    I haven't discarded the option yet to invest in duotrope.
    I would follow as in believe in the words of good moral leaders. Rather than the beliefs of oneself.
    The most difficult thing for a writer to comprehend is to experience silence, so speak up. (quoted from a member)

  2. #2

  3. #3
    I appreciate the answer to my question. Thank you.
    I would follow as in believe in the words of good moral leaders. Rather than the beliefs of oneself.
    The most difficult thing for a writer to comprehend is to experience silence, so speak up. (quoted from a member)

  4. #4
    As a dystopian/post-apocalyptic author I wish I could offer you some help, but I Indie publish all my EOW stuff, then spread the word via survivalist & prepper forums.
    Are you dead-set on going the classic publishing route?

  5. #5
    The short answer is yes I am still thinking of doing that.

    Thank you for offering to help me. I know we have different viewpoints on this because I am going the short story route.

    Well, I wanted to enter it firstly for reasons of wanting to promote anything such as a novel. If I want to write a novel someday. I need the publishing credits so when I attempt the novel I can promote the fact I got published by the well-known magazines of the field. I could try the classical route, but need confidence in my abilities. I need feedback of the supposed expert editors so that maybe one day they could recommend me I figure to a publisher. So that I can get a feeling what sells. What my successes are and what my failures are and where it leads me.

    If I write one particular genre for a good while, and publish it for example. Maybe I could turn that into a novel. It could sell as short stories.

    Writing short stories gives a sense of accomplishment and some decent experience.

    Not to mention I could make my name known in the industry. What does it mean to make a name in the industry anyways? Probably I'd need publicity.

    I am a long ways off since I need to read what comes out in stores consistently. I need to know who the experts are or were, and why they sell. I figure if I could sell work that is in a brand magazine, it's also publicity. Why so? Because I have the perceived notion that people need connections or need to know people who work in those industries. If someone wants to give me a chance, it will be with the previous experience I have already learned from. I have to learn from my mistakes.

    I still have to figure out whether a novel would be the smart thing to do. But if I can handle short stories with consistency then I can write a novel. I know a novel is a more complex task. I am still waiting to be honest until I write consistently correct English.

    Because I think I can handle writing short stories with practice. If I intentionally write long ones and switch the characters it could become a novel even. Especially if it gets published somewhere. I read that this strategy is done often by some authors.

    So first I need practice, then I can think to attempt the novel, and when to do so. But first I need to do everything an author is supposed to do. Marketing work will probably be a result of getting published in different magazines. Which I know a different genre is required it seems at first glance.

    I am a long ways off because I need to have the tools to succeed. (I am always exploring ways to improve my disadvantages when I am dyslexic supposedly). I am taking that seriously of course, and I plan on writing using the best software.

    Your way of writing and marketing I respect. I just have a different way of thinking and a different set of circumstances.
    Last edited by Theglasshouse; September 23rd, 2018 at 11:26 PM.
    I would follow as in believe in the words of good moral leaders. Rather than the beliefs of oneself.
    The most difficult thing for a writer to comprehend is to experience silence, so speak up. (quoted from a member)

  6. #6
    Have you read much EOW literature?
    If not, start with the classics: Earth Abides, Lucifer's Hammer, Calizona, The Stand, The Road, Level 7...

  7. #7
    I already bought 3 books to read this month. I don't think I can finish over 2400 pages this month. I am building a collection. Just when I need inspiration it has been handy to buy books and was inspired a bit when rewriting. I want to experiment with genres I have never written since that is one of the points writers hear often. To read as much as possible. To be inspired by any genre. I don't feel like splurging on books yet when I have to read what I have currently bought. Thanks though.

    To answer your question I am familiar obviously with some end of the world stories. Sure it would be nice to read them. But apocalypse fiction isn't my main focus. It's a subgenre I liked so I tried to write one. I want to learn a little bit of everything since it needs to be my habit. I need to read a little bit of each genre. Even non-speculative genres I could learn from.
    Last edited by Theglasshouse; September 24th, 2018 at 11:34 PM.
    I would follow as in believe in the words of good moral leaders. Rather than the beliefs of oneself.
    The most difficult thing for a writer to comprehend is to experience silence, so speak up. (quoted from a member)

  8. #8
    I decided to give an update on the situation. I will sign up for duotrope for 1 month. I figure since the pay scale and market I want to find is what I am trying to find. Which is difficult to find this time of year.
    I would follow as in believe in the words of good moral leaders. Rather than the beliefs of oneself.
    The most difficult thing for a writer to comprehend is to experience silence, so speak up. (quoted from a member)

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Ralph Rotten View Post
    Have you read much EOW literature?
    If not, start with the classics: Earth Abides, Lucifer's Hammer, Calizona, The Stand, The Road, Level 7...
    The Road gets way too much praise. It's not even McCarthy's best novel, IMO.

    If you want the grandfather of dystopian fiction, look no further than Zamyatin's We. Afterwards, take Kafka and Huxley for a spin. Orwell took most of his inspiration from those three and often gets credit where it isn't due. Bester wrote one of the greatest dystopian novels that almost no one knows about: The Demolished Man. Don't overlook overpopulation fiction either. Aldiss' Hothouse, Harrison's Make Room, Make Room!, and then you have cyberpunk stuff like P.K.D's Ubik, Gibson's Neuromancer, and prety much anything by John Brunner.

    Modern end-of-world pa is marred significantly by zombie fiction, much like vampires on the horror end of things. Arthur C. Clarke, Larry Niven, and Ray Bradbury have some good entries. Going further back, so, too, Jack London and H.G. Wells. Richard Matheson's I am Legend should be read just to see how one should write vampires. As the man once said, "No one cares to film it the way I wrote it", which is why many people don't even know that the original is about vampires and not the zombie-like creatures in both of its major screen adaptations.

    And I'm sure Moderan will have a few to add.
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  10. #10
    I was just recommending the pillar books of apocalyptic fiction, the must-reads.
    If you wanna write in that genre without covering old ground, then those would be the books to read.
    Most of them still sell well, too.


    And McCarthy's books always have such dark endings you can almost predict how they'll end: everybody is gonna die.

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