Stuck?

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Thread: Stuck?

  1. #1

    Stuck?

    Sometimes I get stuck on a scene. One way I have found of sorting it out is to do a bit of role play.

    I stand and pretend I'm the character, usually with my eyes closed so I can draw the stage on the back of my eyelids. Then I talk, usually I then step to one side and change my voice to become someone else. I will swing swords, hold guns, embrace an invisible lover or whatever it takes. A quick nip back to my keyboard to record anything that I want to keep stops it from evaporating into regret.

    I can't remember which famous writer used to do some vacuum cleaning when they got stuck.

    Anyone else got any tips? Or are willing to try my solution?

    Happy writing Peeps
    BC

  2. #2
    Less people will think you are crazy if you wear a bluetooth headset while you are doing your scenes.

    I do this too; essentially I act out the scene. I get looks during the angry scenes tho. I look a little like the shoe-bomber so I'm surprised no one has called DHS on me.

    Something else I do is shut off the radio when I drive. This forces me to become bored, and engages my imagination.
    I know, it sucks not having some jams on the radio.
    I work out the scenes in the afternoon, then write them the following morning when my brain is at 110%.

  3. #3
    Member QuixoteDelMar's Avatar
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    I track down someone and talk it out. Not looking for suggestions or ideas or feedback, but I've found that just explaining the scene to someone else can crack the dam. If I'm still stuck, I just move on and come back to it later. Skipping ahead and connecting the pieces has led to some pretty great writing, if you'll excuse me honking my own goose for a moment.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by QuixoteDelMar View Post
    I track down someone and talk it out. Not looking for suggestions or ideas or feedback, but I've found that just explaining the scene to someone else can crack the dam. If I'm still stuck, I just move on and come back to it later. Skipping ahead and connecting the pieces has led to some pretty great writing, if you'll excuse me honking my own goose for a moment.

    That is a good way to do it. Just don't wear out your source. Beta-listeners are hard to find unless you're buying the drinks.

  5. #5
    If the problem is progression, I usually start by eliminating all the steps that wouldn't come next. Anything cliched or so completely out of character it would immediately break immersion. Then I look at anything that could happen next, but I don't necessarily want it to (sometimes these are the things that have to happen anyway). Then I convince myself why what I want to happen shouldn't for the sake of characters, plot, whatever. What you're usually left with is your character's next logical progression.

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