Character development: the nuts & bolts of it - Page 3

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  1. #21
    Otto; don't feel bad if you have trouble with English. It is said to be the hardest language to learn, mainly because it is a hodgepodge made from half a dozen other languages. We stole half the language.

  2. #22
    I know Otto could benefit greatly from just deleting every adjective and adverb he sees to improve the readability of his work. I mean delete everyone of these. No one told me but having too many can lead to disjointedness in sentences and makes the sentence read bad outloud. Hemingway came up with it when he wrote the clean and simple sentences in his stories. Chris miller first gave me this advice, and it is the style aspect that storytellers who are not native speakers need to know. It makes it seem incorrect grammar when it is read outloud to yourself. I'd personally delete them all and add them at the end (leaving one or two).
    Last edited by Theglasshouse; August 27th, 2018 at 02:54 AM.
    I would follow as in believe in the words of good moral leaders. Rather than the beliefs of oneself.
    The most difficult thing for a writer to comprehend is to experience silence, so speak up. (quoted from a member)

  3. #23
    Member JJBuchholz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack of all trades View Post
    Important things need to be told as early as possible.
    Agreed. Get it out of the way and let such important bits help set the tone of the story being told, rather than jamming it in when it's too late.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jack of all trades View Post
    I tend to go light on character descriptions. I like leaving most characters up to the reader to imagine as they see fit. It's the personalities that I spend time and words defining.
    I do the very same thing! I prefer having the reader concoct the story in their minds by using minimal descriptions, while going heavy on personality, mannerisms, and traits.

    -JJB
    ​"Strong convictions precede great actions....."

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  4. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by Ralph Rotten View Post
    Otto; don't feel bad if you have trouble with English. It is said to be the hardest language to learn, mainly because it is a hodgepodge made from half a dozen other languages. We stole half the language.
    Thanks, but I never felt bad about it. I am a quick learner and quite a stubborn one. I love languages and never stop learning them especialy as I have good books and a cup of a hot black tea!

  5. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by Theglasshouse View Post
    I know Otto could benefit greatly from just deleting every adjective and adverb he sees to improve the readability of his work. I mean delete everyone of these. No one told me but having too many can lead to disjointedness in sentences and makes the sentence read bad outloud. Hemingway came up with it when he wrote the clean and simple sentences in his stories. Chris miller first gave me this advice, and it is the style aspect that storytellers who are not native speakers need to know. It makes it seem incorrect grammar when it is read outloud to yourself. I'd personally delete them all and add them at the end (leaving one or two).
    I agree about it for 100%. So far I want to put away my works and have a good studying. After that I'd like to look with a fresh eye on my writing.
    P.S. I am a girl so you'd use "her" not "his"

  6. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by JJBuchholz View Post
    Agreed. Get it out of the way and let such important bits help set the tone of the story being told, rather than jamming it in when it's too late.



    I do the very same thing! I prefer having the reader concoct the story in their minds by using minimal descriptions, while going heavy on personality, mannerisms, and traits.

    -JJB
    Great minds think alike!

  7. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by Ralph Rotten View Post
    Back in the day I used to get a lotta rejections because even though I wrote a good story, I had zero character development. My problem was that I didn't even understand what character development was.
    I thought character development was spending a whole page describing a person from top to bottom, or awkwardly telling their whole back story like a noob. It took me a few years (and a lot of rejections) to finally understand what the #@$ I was doing.
    You act as though those are bad ways to develop a character, but then the entirety of the rest of your post is doing just that: "developing" a character by just dumping information on the reader. That's character introduction, not development. True character development doesn't happen on the first page; it happens throughout the story as characters react to and change from the events around them. The most basic example, of course, is the Hero's Journey, where a character starts out as one thing and returns as something else.

    Even if I have an idea of who my characters are when I begin writing, I learn about them and what's important to them as the story goes on. Whenever a catalyst occurs, I consider how the characters would respond to it, and how it affects them afterward. And that's the essence of character development: injecting conflict and putting your characters outside of their comfort zones. That's how we grow in real life; why should it be any different in a story?
    "Either write something worth reading or do something worth writing." - Benjamin Franklin

    "I do not over-intellectualize the production process. I try to keep it simple: Tell the damned story." - Tom Clancy

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