So you need a book cover... - Page 4


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Thread: So you need a book cover...

  1. #31
    Quote Originally Posted by Pete_C View Post
    A vector graphic is a vector graphic. The vector graphic is then used to make a range of other graphics such as .jpg, .eps, .tiff, .png or .pdf. Vector graphics are not limited to PDF format; the PDF is actually designed to be embedded portable document for print preparation.

    Vector graphics are simply graphics where every element is converted to a shape or outline to allow full scalability without pixelation. In short, you are not limited to PDF, which for what you're doing is probably the least suitable format. I would only take a cover to PDF format at the very last moment when it is ready for printing, because editing PDFs is a nightmare, and once flightchecked any changes often mean starting again.
    If you take a PDF and save it as a JPG, it is no longer vectorized, it is then aliased.
    And once it is aliased, you can't get it back.
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  2. #32
    Member Underd0g's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by storiesandpages View Post
    If you take a PDF and save it as a JPG, it is no longer vectorized, it is then aliased.
    And once it is aliased, you can't get it back.
    Not quite sure I understand this, if you take a PDF and save it as a jpeg, you have a PDF and a jpeg. Why save over work product?
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  3. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by storiesandpages View Post
    If you take a PDF and save it as a JPG, it is no longer vectorized, it is then aliased.
    And once it is aliased, you can't get it back.
    A vectorised PDF isn’t a vector graphic; it’s a PDF of a vector graphic.

    Let’s make this simple. You asked if theere’s market for this. In short, no. The designs you’ve shown aren’t great, and your lack of understanding of formats marks you out as amateur. Learn more and be able to supply what people need, and maybe, with a lot of improvement, there’ll be a market. For now, forget it.

  4. #34
    I think he is taking about lossies...but that would have nothing to do with a PDF.

    Personally I prefer JPGs for covers. Sure, you can use a PDF...but they are harder to work with.

    When I build a cover I have 2 files:
    1) A UFO file (the proprietary format for a project file in PhotoImpact) This file can be edited, and elements can be rearranged.
    2) A lossy. When you turn a project file into a JPG it becomes a lossy, meaning that you can no longer edit the elements.

    During creation I keep both files because very often you have to go back and fix/tweak the cover.

  5. #35
    Quote Originally Posted by Pete_C View Post
    A vectorised PDF isn’t a vector graphic; it’s a PDF of a vector graphic.

    Let’s make this simple. You asked if theere’s market for this. In short, no. The designs you’ve shown aren’t great, and your lack of understanding of formats marks you out as amateur. Learn more and be able to supply what people need, and maybe, with a lot of improvement, there’ll be a market. For now, forget it.


    Pete, you be out of line.
    You admonished someone for being an amateur.
    This forum is specifically for amateurs.

  6. #36
    Quote Originally Posted by Underd0g View Post
    Here's a movie poster I did with one of my pics. I live kinda rural.


    Attachment 22424
    My Critique:
    I can't tell if the title of the movie is "Revenge of the Sunflowers" or "Horticultural Zombies".

    This is what I tell my design interns and design students that I meet with regarding posters:

    Decide what the viewer Must See First, and make that dominant. You can't have two elements fighting for dominance in a poster. There MUST be a Hierarchy of Importance. In other words, as the designer it is up to you to lead the viewer through the poster information/elements in the order YOU determine.

    If the title is most important, it should be the most eye-catching element on the poster, and the graphic element (if there is one) in a secondary, or back-up position. After that, the other elements diminish in importance quite dramatically: Subheads, Testimonials, Release Date, Cast and Credits, etc. But all following information should find their appropriate place in the Hierarchy of Importance.

    If you've done your job attracting attention to the dominant item, the viewer's interest will carry them down the hierarchy you've designed until they've processed all the information they need and/or want.

    By way of example, here's a poster I designed and illustrated for a concert in Portland, OR.:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	SWIMFISH-AUG142016.jpg 
Views:	6 
Size:	51.2 KB 
ID:	22444

    The Hierarchy I wanted was as follows:

    1. Band Name
    2. Illustration
    3. Date
    4. Opening Act
    5. Location, Tickets and Times
    Last edited by sigmadog; July 21st, 2018 at 07:17 PM.


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    Graphic Design. Illustration. Happy Dogs.
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  7. #37
    Quote Originally Posted by sigmadog View Post
    My Critique:
    I can't tell if the title of the movie is "Revenge of the Sunflowers" or "Horticultural Zombies".

    This is what I tell my design interns and design students that I meet with regarding posters:

    Decide what the viewer Must See First, and make that dominant. You can't have two elements fighting for dominance in a poster. There MUST be a Hierarchy of Importance. In other words, as the designer it is up to you to lead the viewer through the poster information/elements in the order YOU determine.

    If the title is most important, it should be the most eye-catching element on the poster, and the graphic element (if there is one) in a secondary, or back-up position. After that, the other elements diminish in importance quite dramatically: Subheads, Testimonials, Release Date, Cast and Credits, etc. But all following information should find their appropriate place in the Hierarchy of Importance.

    If you've done your job attracting attention to the dominant item, the viewer's interest will carry them down the hierarchy you've designed until they've processed all the information they need and/or want.

    By way of example, here's a poster I designed and illustrated for a concert in Portland, OR.:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	SWIMFISH-AUG142016.jpg 
Views:	6 
Size:	51.2 KB 
ID:	22444

    The Hierarchy I wanted was as follows:

    1. Band Name
    2. Illustration
    3. Date
    4. Opening Act
    5. Location, Tickets and Times


    That's a nice cover, and it thumbnails nicely.
    What do you charge for a cover like that?

  8. #38
    Quote Originally Posted by Ralph Rotten View Post
    That's a nice cover, and it thumbnails nicely.
    What do you charge for a cover like that?
    One of the band members was a friend of mine, so I did that for free as a favor. If he were a client, I probably would have charged $500 - $800. The illustration took roughly 16 hours.

    To be clear, I'm not posting on WritingForums to generate business. I'm just here to learn and offer insights when I can.

    Custom art is always more expensive than stock art.


    ---------------------------------------------------------------
    Graphic Design. Illustration. Happy Dogs.
    Hidden Content

  9. #39
    Too rich for me (I am notoriously cheap), but great illustration nonetheless.

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