funny problems - how do I solve it? - Page 3

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  1. #21
    Thanks, it's a good feeling when you can see your book up for sale - it takes a lot of work, but it's worthwhile! I got a lot of good tips here while I was writing it, I hope that you find the same.

    HJC
    My novels Hidden Content and Hidden Content are available from Amazon

    You can find me on Twitter: Hidden Content

  2. #22
    The English poet, John Keats, introduced a phrase for the relationship between poet and 'character' or 'situation'. He called it NEGATIVE CAPABILITY, which--to grossly oversimplify--meant the capability of the writer to abandon his Self and become his 'character'. He could then look at the world through his character's eyes.

    I think that's what bdcharles and H Brown were getting at in their early comments on this thread. Right now, your stance seems to be that of a puppeteer, above and off to the side of your characters, trying to figure stuff OUT. So, ask yourself: AM I REALLY READY TO WRITE?

    I would suggest you are not. Surely you need characters involved in their world in some activity either initiated by them or imposed upon them which will provide a source of tension, the resolution of which will be your story. Of course, significant chunks of all this will unfold through the writing process--BUT the characters must have a goal, as bdcharles said, or why would a reader be interested? Put another way--to build a house, you need an idea, a dream. Then you need a concept/mental plan, then a blueprint. Once all that's together, you can start constructing, ever open to new ideas, ever willing to change the blueprint.
    Writers set up the challenges of those Stages in very different ways, and many would add a stage or two . Then they move thru the stages in very different ways--the actual writing process. No cast-in-stone mold available.

    But at least there is a grid , that's the point. Other people can talk with the writer about this principle, even offer suggestions about how to structure it. But only the writer can actually DO it. Because only the writer knows the goal And how he wants his character to get there.

    I find dealing with questions in the abstract slippery and difficult. "How do I get a plot"? just plain makes me nervous. Alternatively-- "My character is a strong, physical male, but early traumas about swimming and drowning have made him deathly afraid of water. He falls in love with an Olympic-class competitive swimmer. . . . ." Now that​ kind of scenario I could discuss.



    ________________________________________________

    "I believe in nothing but the holiness of the heart's affections and the Truth of the imagination". Keats, ​Letters

    "Coleridge would let go by a fine isolated verisimilitude caught from the penetralium of mystery, because of an irritable reaching after fact and reason." Keats, Letters

    "No man is an island entire of itself; every man is a piece of the continent, a part of the main . . . any man's death diminishes me, because I am involved in mankind. And therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls -- it tolls for thee. " John Donne, Meditation XVII

  3. #23
    Art3mis has yet to move beyond multiple threads requesting lists of what not to write, all known cliches, all basic story elements, and expert, vetted sources on forging techniques...The negative capability. That sounds intriguing. Perspective on perspective, definitely something to add to my reading list. And one of the good thing about forums. Even if posters are negligent with their own writing habits, thoughtful and insightful replies show up, resources overlooked by skimmers, but goldmines for those who take time to read and develop their craft.
    Last edited by Darkkin; July 17th, 2018 at 04:55 AM.


  4. #24
    Darkkin -- Keats never wrote any formal literary criticim, not so much as an essay about poetry. ALL of his critical insights are found as asides in his quite wonderful LETTERS, often to his brothers.
    His letters are quite wonderful to read--candid, offhand, casual, and brilliant. His remark about Negative Capability is in the second para. of a Dec 21, 1817 letter he wrote to his brothers. You can read it here:

    http://mason.gmu.edu/~rnanian/Keats-...apability.html



    ________________________________________________

    "I believe in nothing but the holiness of the heart's affections and the Truth of the imagination". Keats, ​Letters

    "Coleridge would let go by a fine isolated verisimilitude caught from the penetralium of mystery, because of an irritable reaching after fact and reason." Keats, Letters

    "No man is an island entire of itself; every man is a piece of the continent, a part of the main . . . any man's death diminishes me, because I am involved in mankind. And therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls -- it tolls for thee. " John Donne, Meditation XVII

  5. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by Art3mis View Post
    I got a funny phenomenon! Often, I got everything, except the plot itself. I got the setting, the characters, the themes, etc. But not the plot. So, how do I solve this problems?
    One technique to pull it out may be:

    A provokes B provokes C provokes D provokes E etc etc etc

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