Does every action sequence have to have a new plot development? - Page 2
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  1. #11
    Okay thanks. Like for example, in the action scene, the villain attempts to kill a witness who knows too much. Now the witness is saved by the protagonist, and they both get away, which mean the villain is going to have to try again later. The plot is not advanced because the villain fails and is just going to have to attempt the same thing all over again. So it's a repeat, rather than advancing in a new direction.

    However, the fact that the villain made an attempt is developing the character, I think.

  2. #12
    Developing the relationship between the hero & heroine, and likely illustrating the villain as well.
    Did you think of a cool way for the hero to save her?

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by ironpony View Post
    Okay thanks. Like for example, in the action scene, the villain attempts to kill a witness who knows too much. Now the witness is saved by the protagonist, and they both get away, which mean the villain is going to have to try again later. The plot is not advanced because the villain fails and is just going to have to attempt the same thing all over again. So it's a repeat, rather than advancing in a new direction.

    However, the fact that the villain made an attempt is developing the character, I think.
    I suppose we just have differing opinions than on plot development. To me, what you just described is plot development. Go for it bro.

  4. #14
    Oh okay. Well for me, a plot development is when the plot is taken in a new direction, where a character will find out something new, or do something new, that will change things. In this case I feel I have no change, since the villain fails and has to repeat the same action, and therefore no change. And I was told before in the writing class I took to make sure every action sequence leads to a new development or change, so I feel I going against the norm maybe. As long as that's okay.

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by ironpony View Post
    Oh okay. Well for me, a plot development is when the plot is taken in a new direction, where a character will find out something new, or do something new, that will change things. In this case I feel I have no change, since the villain fails and has to repeat the same action, and therefore no change. And I was told before in the writing class I took to make sure every action sequence leads to a new development or change, so I feel I going against the norm maybe. As long as that's okay.
    Well if your villain has already tried and failed, and then you write a new sequence where he tries and fails again, I would agree that it would be unnecessary. There's no point in making your reader read through something that's already happened and had the same outcome.

  6. #16
    No the villain just tries and fails once, and before he can get a second attempt, something happens that drives the plot in new direction then. But this same thing that happens, would still happen, regardless if he tried and failed or not prior, or not.

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by ironpony View Post
    No the villain just tries and fails once, and before he can get a second attempt, something happens that drives the plot in new direction then. But this same thing that happens, would still happen, regardless if he tried and failed or not prior, or not.
    Sounds fine to me, sounds like you got a handle on it. Happy writing!

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by ironpony View Post
    My story is a crime thriller and I am left writing the action scenes, but I wonder if every action sequence has to need to a new development or change the character's motivations. Normally this is how it does, but in some stories, you see action scenes, that happen but nothing in the plot or characters is really changed.

    Since it's a screenplay, I tend to use movies as examples, and in the movie Goldfinger as an example, James Bond is captured by Goldfinger's men after failing to save Tilly Masterson. They then take him to where Goldfinger is. On the way, Bond manages to escape their custody, and it leads to a car chase. During the chase, Bond ends up crashing the car, and is re-captured again, only to be taken to Goldfinger again. So nothing really changed here, and even if the chase didn't happen, it would still lead to the same outcome.

    Or in the movie Dirty Harry, the sniper villain is going to shoot his next victim from a rooftop as predicted by the police. So Harry and his partner wait for him. When he arrives, and Harry and the partner try to get him, but he ends up escaping.

    The villains next plan is to kidnap someone for ransom. However, they could have just skipped right to the ransom and cut out the rooftop sniper sequence, and it wouldn't have made any other difference on the story.

    I was kind of thinking of doing that for my story, and writing one of the action scenes, to not cause any change in the plot or characters, and even though it happens, it still builds to the same outcome that it would, if it wouldn't have happened.

    I'm trying to make the story less complicated and simplify it more, and I feel that doing that with at least one of the action scenes, would help simplify. But what do you think?

    Are changing action scenes so they have no plot or character consequence bad?
    Best way to look at it is every sequence advances an arc.

  9. #19
    WF Veteran Bloggsworth's Avatar
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    Generally, if it doesn't, its just padding.
    A man in possession of a wooden spoon must be in want of a pot to stir.

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