How to create a (clichéd) romance plot


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Thread: How to create a (clichéd) romance plot

  1. #1

    How to create a (clichéd) romance plot

    Any experience with creating a (clichéd) romance plot? Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
    Easy fix, read a romance novel of the genre you want to cliche. e.g. Historical, Regency, Harlequin, Contemporary, Romantic Suspence, Inspirational, and Paranormal, just to name a few...I hesitate to include erotica because that has an entire subset of standards. This is a highly defined, long established breed standard genre. Read the books and the recipe becomes clear. Basic research and development. Read the genre to know the genre. Maybe put a little more thought into the specifics of the question, rather than a vague concept. It is like asking for a book and knowing only that it might have a blue cover.

    You want cliched, a more concise term would by archetypial story arc, individual meets individual, angst and various drama ensues, happy ending not always included.
    Last edited by Darkkin; June 26th, 2018 at 02:02 PM.


  3. #3
    I've written over thirty novels, most of them romance... but I certainly try to avoid cliches. Are you thinking of tropes, or...? Why would you want to deliberately write something cliched?

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  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Bayview View Post
    I've written over thirty novels, most of them romance... but I certainly try to avoid cliches. Are you thinking of tropes, or...? Why would you want to deliberately write something cliched?
    I suppose I am thinking of tropes. Is using tropes effective in writing romance? Does it pay off? (My rough draft romance story 'A Whirlepool' is found in the Prose writers workshop).

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Ken11 View Post
    I suppose I am thinking of tropes. Is using tropes effective in writing romance? Does it pay off? (My rough draft romance story 'A Whirlepool' is found in the Prose writers workshop).
    Pay off like making things easier to sell? Probably. There are absolutely romances that are breaking new ground and being totally creative, but a lot of readers seem to be looking for the tropier-stories. I have a new release (out TODAY!!!) that uses the Second Chance Romance trope - former lovers who are reunited and try to make it work this time. To some extent I think the tropiness of romance may be because it's such a huge genre and there's so much being written. And there are only so many ways for people to meet and fall in love! So patterns can definitely be seen...

  7. #7
    I am not sure what you are asking. Typically . . .

    Take her viewpoint (or both), because your readers presumably will be mostly female.

    If it's a book about him and her falling in love. your final climactic scene is them both become aware that they love each other. Meanwhile, he has to appear in the story early. So that leaves a lot of space to fill up in between. Things go slowly, there are setbacks, and obstacle occur regularly.

    For fantasy purposes, he has to be attractive. To take a random book, the male lead in The Fault in Our Stars is described as hot, even though the book probably would be better without it.

    That includes socially attractive. So rich and famous is tops, but financially independent is probably necessary. He has to be nice and caring and he would make a good father.

    There has to be something to keep them interacting. This could be his like for her, or some project they are working on together.

    These aren't really cliches, they're things about structure that the reader probably wants. Being creative usually means finding new ways to do these, or being creative about something else.
    Last edited by EmmaSohan; June 27th, 2018 at 12:15 AM. Reason: typos
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  8. #8
    I have always struggled with romance in my novels. The idea's i have seem amazing in my head, able to visual clearly, as soon as i transfer to paper, it's all lost in translation. And always cringe-worthy!

    Rgds

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by EmmaSohan View Post
    I am not sure what you are asking. Typically . . .

    Take her viewpoint (or both), because your readers presumably will be mostly female.

    If it's a book about him and her falling in love. your final climactic scene is them both become aware that they love each other. Meanwhile, he has to appear in the story early. So that leaves a lot of space to fill up in between. Things go slowly, there are setbacks, and obstacle occur regularly.

    For fantasy purposes, he has to be attractive. To take a random book, the male lead in The Fault in Our Stars is described as hot, even though the book probably would be better without it.

    That includes socially attractive. So rich and famous is tops, but financially independent is probably necessary. He has to be nice and caring and he would make a good father.

    There has to be something to keep them interacting. This could be his like for her, or some project they are working on together.

    These aren't really cliches, they're things about structure that the reader probably wants. Being creative usually means finding new ways to do these, or being creative about something else.
    How about beginning a romance story in medias res?

    Would it be wise to use intellectualism in romance story? Is there public for such stories?
    Last edited by Ken11; June 27th, 2018 at 08:50 AM.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Ken11 View Post
    How about beginning a romance story in medias res?

    Would it be wise to use intellectualism in romance story? Is there public for such stories?
    In media res is fine as long as it's not the middle of the ROMANCE. It's fine to start in the middle of some action and carry on from there, but you shouldn't start in the middle of the RELATIONSHIP, generally.

    And I think of "intellectualism" as being placing primacy on the brain rather than the heart - intellect over emotion. Since the main theme of your story should be an emotion, no, I don't think there's a place for intellectualism. But it occurs to me that you may be using the word in a different way - do you just mean intelligence? If so, obviously, yes, it's fine to use intelligence.

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