I need UK help!

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Thread: I need UK help!

  1. #1

    I need UK help!

    This is a question for people from the UK.
    How would someone from Wales, speaking proper, pronounce airplane? Is it aeroplane, or just airplane?
    Any help would be most cool.

  2. #2
    I can't speak for the Welsh or in their language, but I am not aware that anyone in the UK would simply say "air-plane". There is always that extra vowel noise between those two words although it is difficult to define what it is. It tends to be the universal British English "uh" grunt and may even just be a slight almost unvoiced hiatus between the two words. I would say that it generally sounds more like "air-uh-plane" or "air-er-plane" than "air-oh-plane", which latter might be more appropriate to upper class or earlier twentieth century speech. No doubt Her Majesty would say "air-oh-plane" of course.

    P.S.
    In practice we would just say "plane" but that doesn't answer your question.
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  3. #3
    A British dictionary could help particularly a digital one that can read it back to you. Maybe there is a free online one. Good luck. Speech to to text software that is british might also help. If you are adventurous try experimenting with the international phonetic alphabet and the british language. Again there could be a website on this.

    Most dictionaries that help with pronunciation can include the alphabet. They study phonetics or the study of the sound of language with the international phonetic alphabet which is in most dictionaries.
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  4. #4
    Do you actually need to know how it sounds or simply how to spell it? If so then my British spelling checker flags "airplane" as an error and insists on "aeroplane", which is probably all that you actually need to know as a writer. It's definitely not "airplane" either in spelling or pronunciation anyway.
    'Sharing an experience creates a reality.' Create a new reality today.
    'There has to be some give and take.' If I can take my time I'm willing to give it.
    'The most difficult criticism that a writer has to comprehend is silence.' So speak up.

  5. #5
    I agree with Rob on this. Everyone, from all parts of the UK, would say aeroplane - pronounced airoplane. In ordinary conversation though, it would be more usual to say 'plane.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Ralph Rotten View Post
    someone from Wales, speaking proper
    Anthony Hopkins. Or Richard Burton. Those are very proper Welshmen.

    The way to imitate their speech pattern is to go very heavy on the "R". Stop just short of trilling it -- the proper Welsh "R" is very nearly a "D"). If you do that, you'll find that you can't avoid pronouncing the second syllable. But it's very brief, a schwa rather than a proper vowel, elided almost but not quite to nothing.

    ERR-ǝ-plane.
    I can love my fellow man, but I'm damned if I'll love yours.
    Just because I don't care, doesn't mean I don't understand.

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