Any recommended reading for a crash-course in architecture?

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  1. #1

    Any recommended reading for a crash-course in architecture?

    It's almost ridiculous how many writers I admire seem to have an encyclopedic knowledge of architecture. I couldn't tell you what a portico or a flying buttress is. I desperately want to get my hands on a copy of the book they were all secretly given when they were inducted into the secret society of "Writers who make everyone else look silly."

  2. #2
    While I don't have the vocabulary either. I read some craft advice that interior designers take pictures of homes regularly. Here is an example. It helps a writer describe interiors of homes. I wonder if it would work for places that are European in design such as old villages. Such as a medieval village.

    https://www.google.com/search?q=inte...FHlDtvX0BdLnM:
    Last edited by Theglasshouse; May 29th, 2018 at 04:24 AM.
    I would follow as in believe in the words of good moral leaders. Rather than the beliefs of oneself.
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  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by J T Chris View Post
    It's almost ridiculous how many writers I admire seem to have an encyclopedic knowledge of architecture. I couldn't tell you what a portico or a flying buttress is. I desperately want to get my hands on a copy of the book they were all secretly given when they were inducted into the secret society of "Writers who make everyone else look silly."
    Why do you admire them? Simply because they prattle on about a portico or flying buttress? Or because of the engaging stories?

    You should be able to pick up some of the vocabulary from the books you enjoy.

    Google "words related to architecture" for more. Here's one link : http://www.google.com/url?q=https://...Uw_pMeeXhUqHTm

  4. #4
    It's a bit dated, but one of the books that got me interested in architecture (as a hobby, not a profession) was Looking Around: A Journey Through Architecture by Witold Rybczynski. He was (is?) an architecture critic and the book is a collection of his published essays on the topic.

    But, as I said, it's dated. It came out in 1993.

    For more modern options, you may want to distinguish between domestic and commercial architecture. Most of the architecture critics I'm aware of focus on the larger commercial projects - airports, museums, etc. It's interesting stuff, but I'm not sure you're going to learn about porticos or flying buttresses from it. Actually, I'm not sure you're going to learn about porticos and flying buttresses from many books on modern architecture. Possibly you need a book of architectural history?

  5. #5
    Hey, these are great suggestions. Thank you. I also found an illustrated dictionary on Kindle which is pretty helpful.

  6. #6
    I ran into similar issues doing some fantasy writing that featured medieval and renaissance style buildings. Delving into the various styles of architecture, such as Baroque, Gothic and Industrial, on wikipedia was helpful, also khanacademy.org. But then there were also times when it took me twenty minutes of Google searches to find the proper name of an outdoor patio on the second story of a building (it's a roof terrace).

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