The Future of Writing? - Page 6

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  1. #51
    Quote Originally Posted by Ralph Rotten View Post
    I'm gonna have to side with Mod on this one; There is far more to being a writer than just having an aptitude. That's like saying that the guy who plays pickup games on the weekend is the same level of athlete as an Olympian. Having an aptitude for writing, or a dream to be a writer wearing a beret in Starbucks does not a writer make. Like I have said many times; the first 200,000 words are just practice.

    Writing is like anything else; if you wanna be good at it then you have to practice and work at it...a lot. The difference between a real writer and a hobbyist is about a half million words. Here is an example: I like shooting, and I'm pretty good at it. I may shoot a few hundred rounds a month. But a sponsored shooter (a professional) will shoot thousands of rounds a week, spend 60 hours a week on the range, and another ten hours in the gym. JJ, what you are asserting is that I could be on par with guys like Jerry Miculek just because I have a basic aptitude for shooting. Maybe I could, but not until I put in the time and training, and shoot a half million rounds. Until then I'm just a guy who shoots a little better than most folks, not a professional-grade shooter.
    The guy with the natural talent starts out ahead of the guy with desire and zero talent.

    Which has better odds of getting to the Olympics? Someone with talent or someone with only desire? Can that question be definitively answered? I don't think so. It all depends on how much effort the talented guy puts into practicing.

    This is supposed to be a place where wannabe writers are encouraged, isn't it? So why not encourage those with less experience, instead of putting them down?

    I know, mods! The last is off topic. I'll step down off my soapbox and give myself a timeout.

  2. #52
    Quote Originally Posted by JJBuchholz View Post
    Really now. I'm hardly 'wet behind the ears' so to speak, but..... unlike you, I'm not interested in a 'pissing contest'. I could list my own accolades and such, and go on about things I've accomplished in the world of writing, but I won't. I'm not you, I won't sink to your level, nor help stroke your ego.

    I stand firm to what I said before about people using their gift to the best of their ability, honing their craft along the way. If my opinion has bothered you in some way, too bad. You've done nothing but ridicule me since I joined this community, as well as other people.

    In the grand scheme of the world, you're just another gear in the machine, like the rest of us.

    Remember that.

    -JJB
    You've done nothing to convince me that you have a clue about writing. And you're doing everything you can to establish some kind of pissing contest, sunshine. I'm just providing shade for you to sit in.
    It isn't about my ego -- I don't operate from there. I'm well aware of my small coghood. The examples I cited are just to support my initial statement. There are training grounds and apprenticeships available to people who are serious about careers in writing. Not all of them are involved with institutes of higher learning, but they all take considerable application.
    To say that there aren't, or to deny that there are specific paths toward publication, is ignorant. I maintain that the best way to reach professional markets is to submit work to them, not to give copies of what you fondly imagine is passable work to your friends and family.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jack of all trades View Post
    Please explain the bolded. Thanks.
    I have a good many critiques of the submitted pieces by the editor-in-question, who steered me toward more suitable avenues for a young writer. He did buy a couple that didn't make it into the magazine for one reason or another.





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  3. #53
    Member JJBuchholz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by moderan View Post
    You've done nothing to convince me that you have a clue about writing.
    I'm not here to convince anyone, nor do I answer to you. I joined this forum to learn more about different writing styles, how to improve my own writing, and being part of a community that shares the same passion I do.

    Quote Originally Posted by moderan View Post
    It isn't about my ego -- I don't operate from there.
    The way you communicate with others on this forum that you consider 'inferior' shows otherwise, and I'm not the only one that sees it. You've done nothing but treat me poorly, and for no reason at all.

    Quote Originally Posted by moderan View Post
    I maintain that the best way to reach professional markets is to submit work to them, not to give copies of what you fondly imagine is passable work to your friends and family.
    I have been submitting to all sorts of publications for over a year now, and have been working to refine my writing so that one day, I do get published. It's a never ending learning experience, one that I find most valuable. With every rejection, my resolve gets stronger, and I further refine what I do.

    I thank you for your input, but I feel as if you are trying to make it personal, for whatever reason.

    Have a nice day.

    -JJB
    ​"Strong convictions precede great actions....."

    http://www.jasonbuchholz.net

  4. #54
    OK, guys. I've let the odd little dig go up to now, but it seems to be getting a bit personal at times. There was an earlier warning on this thread about keeping to topic. Put the handbags away please. The thread topic is about the future of writing. Please keep to that.
    Some good points have been raised on this thread and it would be a pity to suspend it, but I will should I deem it necessary.


  5. #55
    Has anyone tried book fairs? For independent and to be published? It could be useful for those who need exposure. More at the link, https://publishedtodeath.blogspot.co...for-indie.html.

    Remember sometimes you need good contacts or just more, to submit a manuscript somewhere. You can even set your own table at such a place I think. There is a long tradition for it.
    Of course, you need to develop talent. But I wonŽt state the obvious. Or youŽd need to develop your writing skills.
    I would follow as in believe in the words of good moral leaders. Rather than the beliefs of oneself.
    The most difficult thing for a writer to comprehend is to experience silence, so speak up. (quoted from a member)

  6. #56
    A.I., even if it is created, won't be writing novels. It is not possible for any A.I. to know more than we know. Even with the potential processing power of the A.I., it will still only have access to what humans have created, and any novel would be a rehash of the novels in its database. One can claim that humans are rehashing as well, and it would be correct, but we still have innovation and can, once in a while, create something original. The knowledge we acquire is mouldable, and the most important thing is that we have the ability to mould it ourselves, while the knowledge A.I. has, or would have, is static. You can program A.I. to exhibit emotion, on the outside, ostensibly, but it won't feel it. They will probably be able to program an A.I. to write a love story, but it will not have any understanding of it. Even if A.I. were to become auto-didactic, it would still not be able to understand love, while it will never, as a species, need love to reproduce and ensure the survival of its kind. Also, a joke told by a self-aware A.I. wouldn't be funny to us, but could be funny to another independent A.I.

    Anyway, it's all too speculative. The bottom line: if A.I. were to use human databases, its creativity would be dry and derivative; and if it were self-aware, then its creativity would be incomprehensible to us.

  7. #57
    Actually, someone has tried to have a computer write a book. Well, a chapter. It's hilarious!


    Harry Potter and the Portrait of What Looked Like a Large Pile of Ash

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=VvpPxjCKTqc

  8. #58
    Quote Originally Posted by Jack of all trades View Post
    Actually, someone has tried to have a computer write a book. Well, a chapter. It's hilarious!


    Harry Potter and the Portrait of What Looked Like a Large Pile of Ash

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=VvpPxjCKTqc
    It sounds like fan-fiction by a die-hard, institutionalised Harry Potter fan.

  9. #59
    I want to read the one that almost won. it woulds be interesting to see why. it at least based a first round. you've got to remember a.i. is in it's infancy still butttt.... technological change is exponential. it will be able to write better in the future... now if it will have human like abilities I don't know. as for data bases it would have all of human knowledge before it ti draw inspiration from. as for emotions. what do you mean. the mechanical nature of our mind produces them. why can't a machine mind once we learn our own mind once e figure out how the human mind does so,

    as for sounding natural. google already has a machine that can fool humans into thinking that it is human. it sets up appointments for you as a phone call.
    Last edited by kunox; June 19th, 2018 at 09:09 PM.
    striding and swagering rootlessness with out end the precious flow of life.

  10. #60
    striding and swagering rootlessness with out end the precious flow of life.

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