Unraveled... The truth about Poetry... - Page 4

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  1. #31
    Quote Originally Posted by H.Brown View Post
    No problem Tgh, I always find that the best way to learn something or improve is to do said thing. So as Pel has already said I would say write something even if you think it is crap and let the poets help you improve, it's such a satisfying feeling to see your poem improve with each edit.
    This is why students are asked to write essays, you learn the facts, you use the facts, the facts become embedded. A good, sound principle; some don't like doing the work, but there really is no alternative.
    Visit my website to read and connect to my 'soundcloud', where you can listen to stories songs and more
    http://www.oliverbuckle.com/

    A thread of links useful to writers wishing to learn
    Piglet's picks. http://www.writingforums.com/threads...Piglet-s-Picks

  2. #32
    Global Moderator H.Brown's Avatar
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    I agree Olly, I have always learned better by writing/doing. You can read all the books you want about perfecting form, rhythm, structure ect, but until you start doing you never reallly know what your poetry will be like, you find your own voice this way.
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  3. #33
    It is the practice in the preach.


  4. #34
    Quote Originally Posted by TuesdayEve View Post
    I decided to view it as literal and feel
    the words as written, which were very powerful and
    relateable...but still, did I miss something?
    Or does it matter?
    If you only read a poem literally I think you (usually) do miss something. Of course to do otherwise than read it literally you need to work at it and some don't like to do that. I think a good poem makes you want to do it, want to think about the language used, the imagery, the rhythm and any rhyme.

    Does it matter? Maybe not to you. Maybe to the poet if he/she/other spent time and energy to provide the layers of meaning (I do and rarely get any feedback on more than the most obvious non-literal meanings). But that's the poet's problem, not yours. If you get joy from the literal meaning of poems then that is great. But I suggest you try to work out deeper meanings and see if that might give you even more joy.

  5. #35
    I must admit, I sometimes wonder if readers and analysts find deeper meanings that the original poet had not realised were there
    Visit my website to read and connect to my 'soundcloud', where you can listen to stories songs and more
    http://www.oliverbuckle.com/

    A thread of links useful to writers wishing to learn
    Piglet's picks. http://www.writingforums.com/threads...Piglet-s-Picks

  6. #36
    As one who loves to read and with a vivid imagination, I’ve found it a boon and curse to my poetry. I have a tendency to use openly descriptive words so the reader can create there own meaning. This has led me to not use emotion as much as I should.
    Now, when I read poetry it helps md create images that means something to mebased on my history and experiences.
    I see poets as literary mood creators. We seek to create a mood in the readers mind that they can identify with and relax into, the snippet of our imagination.
    "Illegitimi non carborundum " Vinegar' Joe Stilwell

    "Faith is taking the first step, even when you don't see the whole staircase." Martin Luther King Jr.

    What you learn in life is important, those you help learn, are more important.

    "They can because they think they can."
    ​Virgil

  7. #37
    Quote Originally Posted by Olly Buckle View Post
    I must admit, I sometimes wonder if readers and analysts find deeper meanings that the original poet had not realised were there
    All the time, and time after time. I envision William Carlos Williams laughing at all the deep interpretations of The Red Wheelbarrow. Mediocre poetry is often perfumed by others. Except for my own, of course. Smiles.

  8. #38
    I need time everyone for writing poetry. I haven't ignored the advice. It may be a month later until I fulfill the requests. I pop in here every now and then in this thread.
    I would follow as in believe in the words of good moral leaders. Rather than the beliefs of oneself.
    The most difficult thing for a writer to comprehend is to experience silence, so speak up. (quoted from a member)

  9. #39
    Quote Originally Posted by sas View Post
    All the time, and time after time. I envision William Carlos Williams laughing at all the deep interpretations of The Red Wheelbarrow. Mediocre poetry is often perfumed by others. Except for my own, of course. Smiles.
    Why are the chickens white when the wheel barrow is red and nothing blue is worth mentioning? Is this why things depend on it? and what are they exactly? The world depends on external forces for our view of it, if the rain stops the sky turns blue and the wheelbarrow loses its glaze, what would be the extent of that change? Possibly even more important, why are the chickens out in the rain? Is this natural? Are there ducks anywhere? Are they runner ducks?

    "Quick, run," said the duck, "Or we might get caught up for eternity in a poem."

    I would have made a great literature student
    Visit my website to read and connect to my 'soundcloud', where you can listen to stories songs and more
    http://www.oliverbuckle.com/

    A thread of links useful to writers wishing to learn
    Piglet's picks. http://www.writingforums.com/threads...Piglet-s-Picks

  10. #40
    Ned,

    Yep, yep, yep. Which is why I wrote my own Red Wheelbarrow poem to explain his, in last month’s poetry challenge. I figured I could perfume William’s poem, too. Smiles.

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