genre, slipstream?


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Thread: genre, slipstream?

  1. #1

    genre, slipstream?

    some WF members may be familiar
    with some of my posted writing.

    during some research surrounding
    the idea of genre, i ran across
    slipstream.

    there was wiki comment
    (attributed to 2 SF authors)
    that slipstream employs cognitive dissonance
    to create a strangeness effect,
    which made slipstream a literary device,
    not a genre.

    if this is a genre, perhaps it is a term
    appropriate to use as i pursue publishing
    opportunities.

    1) do you think of slipstream as a genre or device?
    2) if you have read any of my writing, do you think
    slipstream is appropriately descriptive?

    pls.n.thx,

  2. #2
    Point to some examples.

  3. #3
    I'd say Slipstream was a genre; it's the overlap between science fiction and contemporary literature.

    Many will disagree, but as I understand it it's more a case of when the writing is more towards contemporary mainstream literature but has unusual, unexpected or unexplained elements that cross boundaries but fall short of being fully blown sci-fi.

    It falls into speculative fiction, which is another catch-all. I sometimes struggle to know how to categorise what I write. Genre-wise I'll let others decide. In my own head it's neo-absurdist!

    The reality is that genre is often decided by publishers based upon how they think the book will be best marketed. It's one of those things that many writers think they get to choose (a bit like book titles) but the publisher has the final word.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Greenstein View Post
    Point to some examples.
    mine,
    or
    what someone has labeled slipstream?
    pls.n.thx.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Pete_C View Post
    In my own head it's neo-absurdist!
    that's a great genre name!

  6. #6
    I'd say Slipstream was a genre; it's the overlap between science fiction and contemporary literature.
    Bruce Sterling would likely agree, and he created the term. Though he'd say "an overlap" to differentiate from litfic that borrows tropes from sf a la Atwood, DeLillo.
    William Gibson's latter-day novels, such as Zero History or Pattern Recognition, would be good examples.
    Hidden Content
    "From the moment I picked your book up until I laid it down, I was convulsed with laughter. Someday I intend reading it." - Groucho Marx

  7. #7
    Would the Twilight Zone be Slipstream?
    "Illegitimi non carborundum " Vinegar' Joe Stilwell

    "Faith is taking the first step, even when you don't see the whole staircase." Martin Luther King Jr.

    What you learn in life is important, those you help learn, are more important.

    "They can because they think they can."
    ​Virgil

    "Wise men speak because they have something to say; Fools will speak to say something." Plato

    "The only difference between reality and fiction is that fiction needs to be credible."
    ​ Mark Twain

    "To those of you who received honors, awards and distinctions, I say well done. And to the C students, I say you, too, can be president of the United States." George W. Bush



  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Pelwrath View Post
    Would the Twilight Zone be Slipstream?
    certainly could be.
    some night gallery stories, too.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by -xXx- View Post
    that's a great genre name!
    Join the movement! It starts here, today!

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Pete_C View Post
    Join the movement! It starts here, today!
    neo-absurdist (short form):

    the day after i said NO,
    i found my spine
    had completely dissolved
    in the night;
    no pain,
    but coordination
    was a real problem.


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