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Thread: Theory of Writing

  1. #61
    Quote Originally Posted by EmmaSohan View Post
    To Kyle ...

    The problem you mention (Hazel thinking her actions will ultimately not make a difference, say in a billion years) is not emotional death, it's a somewhat philosophical point. I like how Hazel has answered it, so I'm not even rooting for her to change. There's no escalation, there's no final conflict for this problem, and no resolution.
    See, to me, the entire story is an escalation of this conflict:

    Hazel believes that everything is pointless.
    Augustus believes that everything has meaning.

    ^ Conflict.

    In contemporary Romances, the Love Interest generally takes the role of the Antagonist. Their character antagonizes the protagonist—by challenging their way of thinking and/or living.

    It's not an External Conflict, like The Lord of the Rings ("Carry the ring to Mordor and destroy it—but watch out for bad guys along the way!").

    Rather, The Fault in Our Stars is built upon an Internal Conflict: (Girl suffering from terminal disease believes that she's best off withering away and dying with as few emotional casualties as possible—but a boy comes along who believes she should do the opposite: to live, to adventure, and to love.)

    That's the conflict of the story.

    Quote Originally Posted by EmmaSohan
    Hazel has a problem: She has cancer.
    Hazel's problem isn't her cancer. Hazel's problem is that her cancer has made her give up on life. Augustus is the antagonist—he's there to, quite literally, antagonize her with his opposing viewpoint.

    Antagonize (as defined by Merriam-Webster): to act in opposition to

    -----

    That's how I view ​The Fault in Our Stars, anyway. If that perspective doesn't work for you, that's okay. There's no requirement that says we all have to view fiction through the same lens. That's part of what makes writing (and reading) so great.

  2. #62
    Quote Originally Posted by Kyle R View Post
    See, to me, the entire story is an escalation of this conflict:

    Hazel believes that everything is pointless.
    Augustus believes that everything has meaning.

    ^ Conflict.

    In contemporary Romances, the Love Interest generally takes the role of the Antagonist. Their character antagonizes the protagonist—by challenging their way of thinking and/or living.

    It's not an External Conflict, like The Lord of the Rings ("Carry the ring to Mordor and destroy it—but watch out for bad guys along the way!").

    Rather, The Fault in Our Stars is built upon an Internal Conflict: (Girl suffering from terminal disease believes that she's best off withering away and dying with as few emotional casualties as possible—but a boy comes along who believes she should do the opposite: to live, to adventure, and to love.)

    That's the conflict of the story.


    Hazel's problem isn't her cancer. Hazel's problem is that her cancer has made her give up on life. Augustus is the antagonist—he's there to, quite literally, antagonize her with his opposing viewpoint.

    Antagonize (as defined by Merriam-Webster): to act in opposition to

    -----

    That's how I view ​The Fault in Our Stars, anyway. If that perspective doesn't work for you, that's okay. There's no requirement that says we all have to view fiction through the same lens. That's part of what makes writing (and reading) so great.
    Just wanted to comment I write in YA fiction and for me, my plots are flipped. If anything, the love interest is antagonized by the protagonist, and the pressure my characters face is typically both external and internal. Something interesting to note is that John Green is very repetitious, of the four of his five novels I've read, he has written all of those plots with the same formula as he wrote The Fault in our Stars. The novels 13 Reasons Why, The Beginning of Everything, and Every Day are also novels that come to my mind that hallow a similar formula. There are other works popular YA though like the Spectacular Now that have those roles flipped similar to the pattern I occupy.
    My website & Goodreads author page
    My Twitter & Facebook Page
    My First Novel & My Other Novel
    www.Enigmaphotographystudios.com
    "Read with hunger, write with joy, and live with passion."

  3. #63
    Quote Originally Posted by EmmaSohan View Post
    What did you want to call it? Garvan called it the "traditional" story arc. You said things were simple, so I would like to call it the Simple Writing Theory. Okay? Of course, you might want to call it The Only Writing Theory.
    I don't need to label it as anything. The idea that stories have structure, that then consist of characters, settings, situations, conflict and resolution works for me. You can call it what you want, but understand that you are misleading new writers by insinuating that there is some deep complex 'theory' behind writing that Emma has to show them.
    “Fools” said I, “You do not know
    Silence like a cancer grows
    Hear my words that I might teach you
    Take my arms that I might reach you”
    But my words like silent raindrops fell
    And echoed in the wells of silence : Simon & Garfunkel


    Those who enjoy stirring the chamber-pot should be required to lick the spoon.

    Our job as writers is to make readers dream, to infiltrate their minds with our words and create a new reality; a reality not theirs, and not ours, but a new, unique combination of both.

    Visit Amazon and the Kindle Store to check out Reflections in a Black Mirror, and Chase

    https://www.amazon.com/author/terrydurbin






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