Poetic License


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Thread: Poetic License

  1. #1

    Poetic License

    Poetic License: The freedom to depart from the facts of a matter or from the conventional rules of language when speaking or writing in order to create an effect:"he used a little poetic license to embroider a good tale"


    Here's my question. Does this actually exist? If so are there circumstances when it's not allowed? What circumstances? If it does exist, what does it allow you to do and not allow you to do? Can I use "..." in a title? Can you deviate from the norms of a type of poetry?
    "Illegitimi non carborundum " Vinegar' Joe Stilwell

    "Faith is taking the first step, even when you don't see the whole staircase." Martin Luther King Jr.

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    ​ Mark Twain

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  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by Pelwrath View Post
    Poetic License: The freedom to depart from the facts of a matter or from the conventional rules of language when speaking or writing in order to create an effect:"he used a little poetic license to embroider a good tale"


    Here's my question. Does this actually exist? If so are there circumstances when it's not allowed? What circumstances? If it does exist, what does it allow you to do and not allow you to do? Can I use "..." in a title? Can you deviate from the norms of a type of poetry?


    I think that to write poetry, one cant help BUT to use poetic license.... and the use of the metaphor is just one example of using that license...Poetry is about using language in new ways to express well known emotions... so the reader can experience these emotions in a new, different way..
    I believe one should deviate from the norm and forge new styles/ types of poetry.. but a wonderful mentor here at WF said you need to know the rules before you break them...
    She lost herself in the trees,
    among the ever-changing leaves.
    She wept beneath the wild sky
    as stars told stories of ancient times.
    The flowers grew toward her light,
    the river called her name at night.
    She could not live an ordinary life,
    with the mysteries of the universe
    hidden in her eyes....
    Author: Christy Ann Martine

    Death leaves a heartache no one can heal,
    love leaves a memory no one can steal....
    Author unknown.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Pelwrath View Post
    Poetic License: The freedom to depart from the facts of a matter or from the conventional rules of language when speaking or writing in order to create an effect:"he used a little poetic license to embroider a good tale"


    Here's my question. Does this actually exist? If so are there circumstances when it's not allowed? What circumstances? If it does exist, what does it allow you to do and not allow you to do? Can I use "..." in a title? Can you deviate from the norms of a type of poetry?

    You can do anything you want in poetry, but logic is still a contibuting factor. Try and call quatrain a limerick, don't get mad if a reader calls bullshit. Shed's piece Greek to Me is a good example of how outside sources can be incorporated into poetry. Content is up to the writer, but classic forms are tricker to utilize. The issue with 'poetic license' is that it too often become an excuse for shoddy construction of a piece. e.g. misspellings, misused words, illogical pairings, ungrounded content...

    Essentially, be cognizant of your content, line to line and as a whole and you should be all right.

    - D.


  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Pelwrath View Post
    Poetic License: The freedom to depart from the facts of a matter or from the conventional rules of language when speaking or writing in order to create an effect:"he used a little poetic license to embroider a good tale"


    And you ask if it exists. Read carefully. The first part is freedom to depart the facts. That means I can say something like "I'd christened my laptop with evian water" when maybe I'd spilled an aquafina or ozarka or even ordinary tap water on it but it flows better (read it aloud if you can't spot what I'm talking about).

    "To boldly go where no one has gone before" breaks a grammar rule, but for an effect. That's the kind of thing meant. Not wholesale disregard of logic.
    Everything you want is just outside your comfort zone.
    Robert G. Allen

  5. #5
    'Poetic License' is generally not applied to the field of poetry. Poetry is the object of that term, not the subject. The term is used to refer to the practice of deviating from clear and specific language in conversation and writing. You almost never see it used in scientific papers, legal documents, legislation and the law, for example. These are cases where poetic license is deeply frowned upon. In fact, any sort of clear and unambiguous communication assumes that poetic license is forbidden - otherwise it leads to confusion.

    Poetry is the object of the term - it is the origin thought or notion. You may apply it to poetry if you feel like a bit of mental recursion but it is wholly unnecessary - something like saying 'the cat is catlike'. It is self-referential.

    But, we live in odd times where even an attempt to be clear can be seen as an affront to someone's liberty. So who knows. Maybe all the foundational rules that define a lot of things have been watered down to the degree that applying 'poetic license' to poetry somehow makes sense to someone. It doesn't to me.

    In my view, of course.
    P E R F E C T L Y . D A M A G E D

    I am an interpretation of my experiences. Had I been born in a different time, a different place, I would be a different person.

  6. #6
    lol

    It's a term. The idea is, if you name it, you can discuss it more readily.

    It's not a requisite of poetry or prose, but it does exist, so naming it was wise. Saying things that aren't threefold truth1 is poetic license. So it happens often. That's actually its usual meaning.










    1 - The truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth
    Everything you want is just outside your comfort zone.
    Robert G. Allen

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by HorseDragon View Post
    'Poetic License' is generally not applied to the field of poetry. Poetry is the object of that term, not the subject. The term is used to refer to the practice of deviating from clear and specific language in conversation and writing. You almost never see it used in scientific papers, legal documents, legislation and the law, for example. These are cases where poetic license is deeply frowned upon. In fact, any sort of clear and unambiguous communication assumes that poetic license is forbidden - otherwise it leads to confusion.

    Poetry is the object of the term - it is the origin thought or notion. You may apply it to poetry if you feel like a bit of mental recursion but it is wholly unnecessary - something like saying 'the cat is catlike'. It is self-referential.

    But, we live in odd times where even an attempt to be clear can be seen as an affront to someone's liberty. So who knows. Maybe all the foundational rules that define a lot of things have been watered down to the degree that applying 'poetic license' to poetry somehow makes sense to someone. It doesn't to me.

    In my view, of course.
    Q: do you think in words? Really? Do you not think the thought first, and only then put it into words? So when you dream do you see text? Mm.
    Why am I asking this? Because I don't think you do. I think all your words are a translation into text of your thoughts. You do that. We all do that. So we can talk to others.

    Words are a description of things. They are a translation of an idea, or thought of a thing into words.

    What if there was a thing you had no word for? What if you went in the books and you looked for it but you found no perfect word for it? Okay... What if you saw something a certain way, and no one else seemed to see it the same as you? Then what would you do? Would you simply call it what everyone else does? describe it the same way everyone else does? Because that's what the books say?

    So...if you then share that description, have you not done a poor job of it? You've followed the rules, the accepted way of doing things, yes, but your translation is not accurate. It's not really what you see, is it? One might say that you're not being truthful by being inaccurate.

    So there is an example as to the 'why' of poetic license: to come up with a way to describe something and thereby share an experience, with others, in a way that has not been done before in order to be more 'true' to your personal vision.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by astroannie View Post
    lol
    Who are you laughing at? And why?
    P E R F E C T L Y . D A M A G E D

    I am an interpretation of my experiences. Had I been born in a different time, a different place, I would be a different person.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin View Post
    Q: do you think in words? Really? Do you not think the thought first, and only then put it into words? So when you dream do you see text? Mm.
    Why am I asking this? Because I don't think you do. I think all your words are a translation into text of your thoughts. You do that. We all do that. So we can talk to others.

    Words are a description of things. They are a translation of an idea, or thought of a thing into words
    You state the obvious like it is a revelation. What is your criticism? I have no idea what you are getting at with this line of reasoning. What point are you trying to make?

    PS: Is there any reason for the patronizing tone? It's not like I'm a spring chicken, ya know.
    P E R F E C T L Y . D A M A G E D

    I am an interpretation of my experiences. Had I been born in a different time, a different place, I would be a different person.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by HorseDragon View Post
    You state the obvious like it is a revelation. What is your criticism? I have no idea what you are getting at with this line of reasoning. What point are you trying to make?

    PS: Is there any reason for the patronizing tone? It's not like I'm a spring chicken, ya know.
    patronizing... Oh, if I am, sorry.

    What is my point? I was attempting to offer a reason as to why someone might employ poetic license. You stated that you don't agree with the use of poetic license, that it waters down things, and I was attempting to say or show that when encountering the established rules or limitations some use poetic license in an attempt to better communicate. I am offering a different viewpoint.

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