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Thread: Choice of improving

  1. #21
    Really it's both, however you can pay (rather a lot, probably) to have the work edited. You cannot pay to have a good story.

    It's in your interests to work diligently at both and there's no reason why you can't.

  2. #22
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    Which do you feel you can do better? Judging from what you've said, maybe focus on SPaG more. If you can plot out a story pretty well and can convey theme but you think your grammar's not good, then that's a good indicator on what you need to focus on.

  3. #23
    I agree that spelling and grammar is secondary.

  4. #24
    Writing is the craft of effectively telling a story. Everyone has a story to tell, but the thing that sets the greats apart from the rest is how well they use the tools available to them. Yes, spelling and grammar are the most basic of those tools, but the way you construct paragraphs, portray dialogue, handle pace, and all the rest is far more technical (and far more important) than just the plot you're trying to tell.

    In short, a story isn't a story unless it has the proper technical foundation.
    "Either write something worth reading or do something worth writing." - Benjamin Franklin

    "I do not over-intellectualize the production process. I try to keep it simple: Tell the damned story." - Tom Clancy

  5. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by Gamer_2k4 View Post
    Writing is the craft of effectively telling a story. Everyone has a story to tell, but the thing that sets the greats apart from the rest is how well they use the tools available to them. Yes, spelling and grammar are the most basic of those tools, but the way you construct paragraphs, portray dialogue, handle pace, and all the rest is far more technical (and far more important) than just the plot you're trying to tell.

    In short, a story isn't a story unless it has the proper technical foundation.
    It's why there's no such thing as show and tell, only degrees of telling.

    But it's not just the tools, but the sociocultural aspect too that needs mastering. Dickens' "Marley was dead" uses a relational clause and portrays the most basic method of telling. To the inexperienced, summary instances like that will be an example of 'bad telling', yet tie into the next part "to begin with", he shifts schema-reinforcing material (what's known to the reader) into schema-refreshing (what's unknown): Marley was dead... to begin with. He turns everything about death on its head with a very good example of when to use basic telling. Hauntings aren't so huge for our time, but back when it was written...? Perfection. One sentence, just one opening sentence, and Dickens has the reader in his palm. And it's this twist of schema-reinforcing v schema-refreshing and other tools that most times makes a classic novel: Wells and War of the Worlds (English superiority being turned on its head at the height of British power), Animal Farm... Nineteen Eighty-Four...
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  6. #26
    Member Rojack79's Avatar
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    Personally I can plow through a poorly written book if the plot and story are good enough. I would say focus on plot, story, and characters first. A well written story can always fall flat do to cardboard cutouts being passed off as 'characters'. A poorly written story with great characters can truly shine with a little polish and elbow grease.
    This might not be my best work but that just means there's room to improve.

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