Cliches -- (why) are they bad? - Page 2

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Thread: Cliches -- (why) are they bad?

  1. #11
    We talked about this earlier somewhere Clark. In my own language I am/very well capable of recognizing and avoiding cliches, In English however that is much more difficult. It requires serious research. And I DO research, so you can't call me lazy. I think I do a pretty good job, unless I write a poem that just comes out of nowhere. I'd better not post such a one right away, because it drips of cliches. But lazy? Nah
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    I am a clay potato in a strawberry field
    -Darren White, from "Clumsy"

  2. #12
    Darren -- YOU'RE SPECIAL. oUT OF THE LOOP. cLICHES IN any LANGUAGE ARE LEARNED IN THE CRADLE. Of course you're going to work your butt off on these things. . .but don't use YOUR HARD WORK AS SOME KIND OF ARGUMENT against 'lazy.' Uh-uh.



    ________________________________________________

    "I believe in nothing but the holiness of the heart's affections and the Truth of the imagination". Keats, ​Letters

    "No man is an island entire of itself; every man is a piece of the continent, a part of the main . . . any man's death diminishes me, because I am involved in mankind. And therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls -- it tolls for thee. " John Donne, Meditation XVII

  3. #13
    Clark, I'll ssshhhh now
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    I am a clay potato in a strawberry field
    -Darren White, from "Clumsy"

  4. #14
    I don't ever want to shhhhh you, Darren. Even in jest!



    ________________________________________________

    "I believe in nothing but the holiness of the heart's affections and the Truth of the imagination". Keats, ​Letters

    "No man is an island entire of itself; every man is a piece of the continent, a part of the main . . . any man's death diminishes me, because I am involved in mankind. And therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls -- it tolls for thee. " John Donne, Meditation XVII

  5. #15
    Darren

    It's not so much that they are wrong as it is how they are used.
    They are bad when they are "old hat". <—— (that's a cliche.)
    It is common usage as a metaphor. So we have all heard it before.
    Put a twist on it and it becomes quite another thing.

    Kay Ryan 16th U.S. Poet Laureate writes poems about cliches.
    She is fond of malapropisms and clichés, two linguistic devices
    one, often with unintentionally amusing effect, as in, for example,
    “dance a flamingo ” (instead of flamenco).
    with so many surprises that the silliest clichés become fertile ground.
    She would change their meanings into something new
    by deliberately misinterpreting the cliche into a new viewpoint.
    Like "Nothing Ventured Nothing Gained."

    Nothing Ventured

    Patience is wider
    than one once envisioned,
    with ribbons of rivers
    and distant ranges
    and tasks undertaken
    and finished with modest
    relish by natives
    in their native dress.
    Who would have
    guessed it possible
    that waiting is
    sustainable— a place
    with its own harvests.
    Or that in time's
    fullness the diamonds
    of patience couldn't be
    distinguished from
    the genuine in
    brilliance or hardness.

    by
    Kay Ryan

  6. #16
    Ha!
    I really like this one Ron,
    but I have to look up everything to be able to recognize it as a cliché...
    I see it as a regular poem, I am blind to it, and have to study every single line to understand why it is cliché.
    I think that I only recognize them in the last five lines

    Edit:
    Oh, and in search of the poem you mentioned, I found this ARTICLE
    Last edited by Darren White; October 24th, 2017 at 08:16 AM.
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    I am a clay potato in a strawberry field
    -Darren White, from "Clumsy"

  7. #17
    There are no bad cliches, only writers who can't use them effectively.

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by The Fantastical View Post
    There are no bad cliches, only writers who can't use them effectively.
    Interesting. Can you elaborate and provide an example? As mentioned in my prior post on this there are a few cases where I believe they work but mainly just in dialogue or to inject a sense of irony.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by VonBradstein View Post
    Interesting. Can you elaborate and provide an example? As mentioned in my prior post on this there are a few cases where I believe they work but mainly just in dialogue or to inject a sense of irony.


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    Tolkien. One long lovely perfect, "cliche". The topics, the motives, the character, the races. Yet modern fantasy would not be where it is today without him.

  10. #20
    Wɾ¡ʇ¡∩9 bdcharles's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Fantastical View Post
    Tolkien. One long lovely perfect, "cliche". The topics, the motives, the character, the races. Yet modern fantasy would not be where it is today without him.
    Cliches are time-dependent. When the first person or an early adopter uses them, it's fresh and original. When the nth writer drops them in, not so much.


    Hidden Content Monthly Fiction Challenge


    Beauty is nothing but the beginning of terror which we are barely able to endure, and are awed,
    because it serenely disdains to annihilate us.
    - Rainer Maria Rilke, "Elegy I"

    *

    Is this fire, or is this mask?
    It's the Mantasy!
    - Anonymous

    *

    C'mon everybody, don't need this crap.
    - Wham!





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