Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 27 of 27

Thread: Iambic Pentameter - Write Two Lines

  1. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by Darren White View Post
    Do you mean that poem is two syllables????
    It is, I checked Howmanysyllables
    That's simply awful, I've always treated it as one LOLOL
    Languages!
    I tend to use a dictionary. However, the HowManySyllables does appear to be a good reference point. Like
    Check Out Our Members' Creative Works on <FLASHES of BRILLIANCE>



  2. #22
    Syllable count can vary with dialect, as can the stress point of a word - but most of it is consistent across the main brands of English.


  3. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by PiP View Post
    I tend to use a dictionary. However, the HowManySyllables does appear to be a good reference point. Like
    Yeah, I check dictionaries, Thesaurus, anything...
    But it simply didn't occur to me that poem could be more than one syllable, so I never even thought about checking it

    Howmanysyllables is cool, there are more of those sites, it's tricky business, syllable counting. The number of syllables depends on where you come from, US, UK, Australia, or even different regions in one country.....
    "We love to live life, if we are given the chance to walk its road"
    - Mahmoud Darwish.

  4. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by Darren White View Post


    Yeah, I check dictionaries, Thesaurus, anything...
    But it simply didn't occur to me that poem could be more than one syllable, so I never even thought about checking it

    Howmanysyllables is cool, there are more of those sites, it's tricky business, syllable counting. The number of syllables depends on where you come from, US, UK, Australia, or even different regions in one country.....
    Here's one: pate Here's two: paté


  5. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Istine View Post
    Syllable count can vary with dialect, as can the stress point of a word - but most of it is consistent across the main brands of English.
    This may be a 'doh' question, but regardless of what the dictionary dictates as correct, I wonder if the stress points of spoken American English different to English (English)?
    Check Out Our Members' Creative Works on <FLASHES of BRILLIANCE>



  6. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by PiP View Post
    This may be a 'doh' question, but regardless of what the dictionary dictates as correct, I wonder if the stress points of spoken American English different to English (English)?
    On TV programmes, I've noticed that on a few words, the stress sometimes falls on a different syllable. I'm not certain but I think this happens more in the south. I'm trying to think of an example but none spring to mind at the moment.
    EDIT: Got one. Brit English says aluminium. US English says: aluminum . A small spelling change too.


  7. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by PiP View Post
    This may be a 'doh' question, but regardless of what the dictionary dictates as correct, I wonder if the stress points of spoken American English different to English (English)?
    That's something I unfortunately can't answer for you, because I am neither. I'm not even from an English spoken country. I do know however that I stopped doing poetry contests on another site when 'exact rhyme and stress' was requested and mandatory, simply because (as here with the word poem) I miss and err a lot.
    "We love to live life, if we are given the chance to walk its road"
    - Mahmoud Darwish.

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •