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Thread: Yet Still They Count Their Sheep (villanelle)

  1. #11
    I am totally in love with this villanelle. The cesura runs almost through all lines and reminds me of the original Arabic Qasida (not the English version), which is also closely related to music. Absolutely beautiful!!!

  2. #12
    I'd thank you twice if I could. If you have time, tell me more or link me to an easily accessible source....I'm not familiar much with Arabic anything and I'm curious.
    thisWomanCodes
    A twice-weekly programming blog
    Infield Singles: Baseball Poems myFoodWeek.com
    A weekly menu for a family of four
    Eclectica: Genre Poetry



  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by astroannie View Post
    I'd thank you twice if I could. If you have time, tell me more or link me to an easily accessible source....I'm not familiar much with Arabic anything and I'm curious.
    I could tell you a whole lot, but I don't exactly know where to start.
    Once you get me started I am unstoppable, and you really don't want that.
    So I am asking you the question first: Do you want to know about meter, about poets, or would you like to read translations of poems?

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Darren White View Post
    I am totally in love with this villanelle. The cesura runs almost through all lines and reminds me of the original Arabic Qasida (not the English version), which is also closely related to music. Absolutely beautiful!!!
    I want to know an example of what this reminds you of. A translation, please. lol. And the music it's related to. I do music, a bit -- I'm saving up for a guitar of my own and am using a loaner. Links would be helpful.

    Quote Originally Posted by Darren White View Post
    I could tell you a whole lot, but I don't exactly know where to start.
    Once you get me started I am unstoppable, and you really don't want that.
    So I am asking you the question first: Do you want to know about meter, about poets, or would you like to read translations of poems?
    The idea that you would tell me about meter intrigues me. Although I can replicate/mimic rhythms, I can't .... percuss in time to music accurately. I own a Very Nice Tambourine but I keep it locked up because I'm a public nuisance with it. The mimicry comes from my early infatuation with parody--I could rework songs and keep all the subtleties. One of my proudest achievements was "Enter Wagner" a parody of Metallica's "Enter Sandman" for the closing pitcher Billy Wagner, who used the Metallica song as his theme music.

    So here we are then: Meter, Music, what this reminds you of--examples.
    thisWomanCodes
    A twice-weekly programming blog
    Infield Singles: Baseball Poems myFoodWeek.com
    A weekly menu for a family of four
    Eclectica: Genre Poetry



  5. #15
    I wrote a reply, my PC got a hickup... I lost it.....
    I am not going to try again tonight, but I promise to make a decent document once I get my scattered thoughts under control.
    I am sorry

  6. #16
    (I hope the languages in my reply survive, if not I will send you my reply in a different way, annie).

    Contrary to what we are used to in western poetry, some cultures don’t uses stress (or accent) to determine meter. Arabic poetry for instance weighs the length of the syllable. This is the distinction between qualitative (western) and quantitative (arabic) meter. (We will not address here syllable-based languages like French and Chinese)

    The characteristic traditional Arabic poetry is formed by lines (called bayt = home, house), divided in two halves ,one of which is called the sadr (صَدْر) (literally "chest") and the other which is called the ʿajuz (عَجُز) (literally "belly").

    The count of syllables in the lines it not weighed by stress, but by long and short syllables:
    Example:
    Western: u – – u – – – u – – u – u – (u is a short syllable, is a long syllable)
    Verse: Qifā nabki min ḏikrā ḥabībin wa-manzili
    Mnemonic: fa`ūlun mafā`īlun fa`ūlun mafā`ilun

    It is difficult to explain, but the mnemonic doesn’t care for words, it only cares for the counting and order of the syllables, regardless of word endings.

    Now to your villanelle and why it reminded me of lines from an Arabic Qasida.
    The lines are, with a few exceptions, divided in two halves
    The rhyme resembles the almost monorhyme of a Qasida
    So as you maybe understand, it wasn’t so much the content of your villanelle, as the form that reminded me of the Qasida

    I’ll end with a line of poetry in Arabic, which will hopefully show you what I mean. The :: is more or less the comma in your lines. The sentences read from right to left, every sentence ending in the monorhyme ل -Lu

    وَلِي دُونَكُمْ أَهْلُونَ سِيدٌ عَمَلَّسٌ.....:: وَأَرْقَطُ زُهْلُولٌ وَعَرْفَلءُ جَيْأَلُ
    هُمُ ٱْﻷهْلُ َﻻ مُسْتَوْدَعُ ٱلسِّرِّ ذَائعٌ
    ....:: لَدَيْهِمْ وَﻻَ ٱلْجَانِي جَِا جَرَّ يُخْذَلُ
    وَكُلٌّ أَبِيٌّ بَاسِلٌ غَيْرَ أَنَّبِي .............:: إِذَا عَرَضَتْ أُولَى ٱلطَّرَائِدِ أَنْسَلُ
    Last edited by Darren White; June 4th, 2017 at 10:09 AM.

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