How to paint on metal..need advice

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Thread: How to paint on metal..need advice

  1. #1

    How to paint on metal..need advice

    Has anyone painted on metal? I do not want to fire the paint to bake on. Suggestions? Is one type of metal,superior to another for this purpose? I will be doing on my screened porch, so cognizant of fumes. Thanks for any kind of direction.

  2. #2
    Every time I've painted on metal I've simply used acrylic paints. Usually I worked on aluminum sheets that had been treated and cleaned from imperfections. I just simply suggest googling what different types of metals require in the terms of paint. Like I know copper or other bronzed metals you can use both acrylic and oil paints, however with galvanized pieces only water based acrylic should be used due to the zinc layer of galvanization attacking and deforming the oils in oil paint.

    Basically the big thing you need to avoid is imperfections in the metal, mainly rust. Before you paint anything, you should treat it, and clean it, (there a quite a few guides online about cleaning metal that will go way more in depth than I ever could) even if it doesn't look dirty still clean it. Sand it if you can, which may be hard with a screen door.
    "He slides into second with a stand-up double." - Jerry Coleman
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  3. #3
    Bonderised galvanized steel... I did my chimney shrouds about 15 years ago with multiple layers/colors of off-the-shelf "Rustoleum". It's oil based enamel and has held up in the weather, zero peeling/cracking. The 'bonderized' metal has something that allows paint to stick without having to etch the galvanizing.

  4. #4
    WF Veteran Bloggsworth's Avatar
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    I think we need more context - Painting on metal covers everything from artistic endeavours to doorhandles. Whatever, aluminium is always the hardest as you need to acid-etch the surface. For general purposes Rustoleum and Hammerite weather well, and for indoor use almost any oil based paint will work - Just make sure the surface is as clean as you can make it and if possible, use a de-greaser.
    A man in possession of a wooden spoon must be in want of a pot to stir.

  5. #5
    I am not painting a door. I want to paint a picture. Smiles. I guess the same advice will be true. My preference is acrylics, as I use on canvas. I envisioned a shiny bright surface, but was wary of aluminum, for reason mentioned. If acid etch it, I assume the shiny surface will be marred. Hmmm.

  6. #6
    I'd suggest pewter, which is a silvery colour, won't rust, and accepts acrylic paint well. Find a piece that isn't too highly polished. Mask off any areas where you want the metal to be visible in the finished painting, then apply an undercoat of acrylic directly to the metal (I'd use a spray can). Then paint with regular acrylics on the undercoated area.
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  7. #7
    I had visioned a brighter metal than pewter, but will give that consideration, as it accepts paint better. I've no idea as to where to get pewter that is flat. Hmmmm. Thank you!

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by sas View Post
    I had visioned a brighter metal than pewter, but will give that consideration, as it accepts paint better. I've no idea as to where to get pewter that is flat. Hmmmm. Thank you!
    Pewter has a very low melting point and is very malleable. You could easily just pick some up at your local motown thrift shop and melt it down on your kitchen stove. Then lay it out in flat sheets and mold it to your will.
    "He slides into second with a stand-up double." - Jerry Coleman
    "Yet today I consider myself the luckiest man on the face of this earth." - Lou Gehrig
    "After Jackie Robinson, the most important black in baseball history is Reggie Jackson." - Reggie Jackson
    "Your Holiness, I'm Joe Medwick. I, too, used to be a Cardinal." - Joe Medwick to Pope Pius XII
    "I think Tim Wakefield would even say tonight that Tim Wakefield got to Tim Wakefield tonight." - Tim McCarver

  9. #9
    How interesting! Would the pewter not stick to pan? Can it be done in oven? Low temperature, I assume. I'm likin' this. It would not have to be perfectly flat either, as would be more unusual. My selfish son-in-law would probably not give me his tankards. Smiles.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by sas View Post
    How interesting! Would the pewter not stick to pan? Can it be done in oven? Low temperature, I assume. I'm likin' this. It would not have to be perfectly flat either, as would be more unusual. My selfish son-in-law would probably not give me his tankards. Smiles.
    I've melted pewter on a stove top before, literally it's melting point is only 338 degrees Fahrenheit, and some of the alloys can get up to 446. Basically, modern pewter is just tin with some other metals mixed in to make a cheap reliable alloy. What I did to make sheets of pewter was to make a metal box out of a metal with a higher melting point than pewter, (so basically any metal) and then line it with some fire proof wood and then I just poured the molten pewter into the box until it was at a decent consistency. Basically it was just a square mold I made.

    Personally, I suggest just looking up a more detailed guide than my make shift contraption.
    "He slides into second with a stand-up double." - Jerry Coleman
    "Yet today I consider myself the luckiest man on the face of this earth." - Lou Gehrig
    "After Jackie Robinson, the most important black in baseball history is Reggie Jackson." - Reggie Jackson
    "Your Holiness, I'm Joe Medwick. I, too, used to be a Cardinal." - Joe Medwick to Pope Pius XII
    "I think Tim Wakefield would even say tonight that Tim Wakefield got to Tim Wakefield tonight." - Tim McCarver

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