5 Book Cover Design Ideas for Best Selling Books - Page 2


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Thread: 5 Book Cover Design Ideas for Best Selling Books

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by who me? View Post
    ===========================================

    people dont search for covers or thumbnails
    they search for content...
    Pardon if I wasn't all-encompassing there. I meant to say that those in the top 100 who have poor covers are already really well known if they do have covers of that sort. So if clarity of vision (clear title, text, etc) of a cover is important, then why not the aesthetics of the cover? I also would argue that, for unknown authors, people would probably judge them by the cover first before even caring to look into the content. Perhaps I'm unable to prove that, but I suppose it's only as unable as you are to prove that they aren't. Regardless, I'll try my best to explain.

    It is worth saying that there is correlation with seller success (copies moved) and cover quality. https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_s...d=SNBKSWNP523Q <- for reference.

    Now I would say that in all 15 of those listings, only two could be considered under par, but none of them are a template cover, are they? Also note that the vast majority of these books are by self-published authors, like us. Don't you think if they're making this kind of money, they must be doing something right? Do you mean to imply that all of these certifiably-successful people are wrong?

    How about page 2, 3, 4?
    How about the first 100 listings, because when I look I can see maybe five covers that could scarcely be considered template covers.

    Now, seeing this, can you honestly say that the ebook market isn't a physical centric market place that requires looking as good as you possibly can in order to have the most successful product you can?

    Also, for what it's worth, I'm sorry you picked up a bad book with Evanovich on the cover, but you must understand she's not an indie author, she's rolled by Random House, and just like Terry Pratchett, no one cares if their covers are minimalist, because they already know the author.

    I'll step back, because I am curious. If you're so certain of yourself, surely you must have some counter-example. I assume that if you're this sure you can show me a few non-house-published authors that have template-style covers?

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by KellInkston View Post
    Pardon if I wasn't all-encompassing there. I meant to say that those in the top 100 who have poor covers are already really well known if they do have covers of that sort. So if clarity of vision (clear title, text, etc) of a cover is important, then why not the aesthetics of the cover? I also would argue that, for unknown authors, people would probably judge them by the cover first before even caring to look into the content. Perhaps I'm unable to prove that, but I suppose it's only as unable as you are to prove that they aren't. Regardless, I'll try my best to explain.

    It is worth saying that there is correlation with seller success (copies moved) and cover quality. https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_s...d=SNBKSWNP523Q <- for reference.

    Now I would say that in all 15 of those listings, only two could be considered under par, but none of them are a template cover, are they? Also note that the vast majority of these books are by self-published authors, like us. Don't you think if they're making this kind of money, they must be doing something right? Do you mean to imply that all of these certifiably-successful people are wrong?

    How about page 2, 3, 4?
    How about the first 100 listings, because when I look I can see maybe five covers that could scarcely be considered template covers.

    Now, seeing this, can you honestly say that the ebook market isn't a physical centric market place that requires looking as good as you possibly can in order to have the most successful product you can?

    Also, for what it's worth, I'm sorry you picked up a bad book with Evanovich on the cover, but you must understand she's not an indie author, she's rolled by Random House, and just like Terry Pratchett, no one cares if their covers are minimalist, because they already know the author.

    I'll step back, because I am curious. If you're so certain of yourself, surely you must have some counter-example. I assume that if you're this sure you can show me a few non-house-published authors that have template-style covers?
    =======================================

    Correlation is NOT causation.
    Bad covers hurt sales.
    There is NO proof that good covers cause enough sales to pay for them.

    And what is a good cover anyway?
    That is a very subjective thing and it is logically impossible to order covers from best to worst in a consistent manner without contradictions.

    I still say that for ebooks the cover must be clear and easy to read without any confusion.
    Keep it simple and keep it legible at thumbnail size. After that it is the reviews and authors name that sells books.

    I don't obsess over covers so all I can say about them is for the books I actually read.
    Most of my books have plain text on the cover. The ones that are not pure text are very minimalist.

    The difference is that you see things as an artist and have to believe that fancy artistic covers are good.
    I look at things objectively as a true scientist and see that bad covers can hurt sales but find zero evidence that artsycraftsy covers help enough to pay for them.

  3. #13
    What would you consider "proof"?
    Quote Originally Posted by A Wise Person
    Anecdote is not the singular of data.
    However, if it works for one person, it is a proof-of-concept. I know of one person whose change-of-cover turned a mediocre-seller into a top-seller. Does this mean that a good cover will sell your book? No. What it means is that a good cover can help a good book get attention it would otherwise not receive.

    Of course, maybe all your (not you-personal, you-universal) books suck the doorknob. In which case, it doesn't matter what you dress them in, they'll still suck the doorknob.
    Everything you want is just outside your comfort zone.
    Robert G. Allen

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by who me? View Post
    =======================================

    Correlation is NOT causation.
    Bad covers hurt sales.
    There is NO proof that good covers cause enough sales to pay for them.

    And what is a good cover anyway?
    That is a very subjective thing and it is logically impossible to order covers from best to worst in a consistent manner without contradictions.

    I still say that for ebooks the cover must be clear and easy to read without any confusion.
    Keep it simple and keep it legible at thumbnail size. After that it is the reviews and authors name that sells books.

    I don't obsess over covers so all I can say about them is for the books I actually read.
    Most of my books have plain text on the cover. The ones that are not pure text are very minimalist.

    The difference is that you see things as an artist and have to believe that fancy artistic covers are good.
    I look at things objectively as a true scientist and see that bad covers can hurt sales but find zero evidence that artsycraftsy covers help enough to pay for them.
    I feel I need to jump in here.

    People have different preferences on cover style, and this is clearly evident in this forum thread. The thing is, a cover is meant to draw an eye, incite an initial interaction with the prospective reader. First it's the cover, then the synopsis on the back, then maybe a looksee or two at the first pages. The thing you are getting tripped up on is that a cover can be both "artsy" (which is also subjective) and "clean cut" (which is also subjective). There are also a multide of other things that sells books, and a cover is a piece of that puzzle.

    A cover doesn't sell a book on it's own because that isn't it's purpose. The purpose of a cover is to attract attention, I can't tell you how many times I've picked up a book because the cover was damn fine looking. Plain text? That doesn't pique my interest at all. This piques my interest:

    Click image for larger version. 

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    The ones that are not pure text are very minimalist.
    Give me an example. Even minimalist covers are artistic and have meaning to let the reader take a look at it.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Against Happiness? Yea, it's a frowning face. Even being as minimalist as this, it has artistic significance in having the reader subliminally thinking "Hey, that's clever." and looking at the back. It piques the readers interest in being a clever nod to the title.

    Having: This is my Book in Plain TextBy Who Me? In slack Arial has no purpose, and doesn't draw attention to anything.

    The difference is that you see things as an artist and have to believe that fancy artistic covers are good.
    I want to see an example of your covers. Please. Have you had success with your plain text template covers?

    The thing is that they are not seeing it as artists, they are seeing it that good, highly respected books have good covers. There are MANY and I mean MANY unknown authors who cannot just rely on a "name" (like I bet you do) or book reviews, and they need something to draw readers to their craft. Because visually stimulating causes interest and interest leads to a synopsis scan, a synopsis scan can lead to a peek at the first pages, and since the first few pages of any book are designed to be hooks, it usually means the reader buys the book. Of course, this doesn't happen all the time, but I can say with personal experience that a good looking cover, usually means that a person has spent a lot of time crafting this work that they would have a professional artist tie it together in a neat, sweet looking bow.

    I look at things objectively as a true scientist
    Haha. This cracked me up. You see things as black and white with no deviation in the path. It's the classic, if you were given a choice of a path, you would choose the path more taken. Objectively isn't how a scientist sees things. Looking at things objectively is a a limitation, and should be the last thing to be used to gloat with. Seeing things objectively limits you from really experiencing the fullest true potential. And this is your problem. You are looking at covers objectively, unlike KellInkston and Sigma, who the later has created covers and the former has had covers made for his books, who look at it subjectively. Art is subjective, not objective.

    bad covers can hurt sales but find zero evidence that artsycraftsy covers help enough to pay for them.
    You realize that self published authors are not going out and dropping a couple grand on covers, if they had that form of disposable income they would pay a vanity publisher to publish their book. At most it's a couple hundred, but I've seen very good "artsycraftsy" covers go for as low as $45. Besides, why are you the end of the discussion of a "bad" cover? Why are you the final word on what is good? and what is bad? It's subjective like you said, so why should we be giving you a lick of time? Give me a reason here. If you want evidence, hit up a decently busy book store and watch how many people simply walk up to a shelf and look at the cover first. Besides, what's the harm in possibly having something that can boost your sales? You're talking in circles.

    I just wish you the best on opening your mind.
    Last edited by Ptolemy; May 8th, 2017 at 05:48 PM.
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  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Ptolemy View Post
    I feel I need to jump in here.

    People have different preferences on cover style, and this is clearly evident in this forum thread. The thing is, a cover is meant to draw an eye, incite an initial interaction with the prospective reader. First it's the cover, then the synopsis on the back, then maybe a looksee or two at the first pages. The thing you are getting tripped up on is that a cover can be both "artsy" (which is also subjective) and "clean cut" (which is also subjective). There are also a multide of other things that sells books, and a cover is a piece of that puzzle.

    A cover doesn't sell a book on it's own because that isn't it's purpose. The purpose of a cover is to attract attention, I can't tell you how many times I've picked up a book because the cover was damn fine looking. Plain text? That doesn't pique my interest at all. This piques my interest:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	bf668812c8bfadfc99c1bac6c0cd8d9d.jpg 
Views:	10 
Size:	58.0 KB 
ID:	17957

    The ones that are not pure text are very minimalist.
    Give me an example. Even minimalist covers are artistic and have meaning to let the reader take a look at it.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	against-happiness.jpg 
Views:	9 
Size:	4.5 KB 
ID:	17958

    Against Happiness? Yea, it's a frowning face. Even being as minimalist as this, it has artistic significance in having the reader subliminally thinking "Hey, that's clever." and looking at the back. It piques the readers interest in being a clever nod to the title.

    Having: This is my Book in Plain TextBy Who Me? In slack Arial has no purpose, and doesn't draw attention to anything.

    The difference is that you see things as an artist and have to believe that fancy artistic covers are good.
    I want to see an example of your covers. Please. Have you had success with your plain text template covers?

    The thing is that they are not seeing it as artists, they are seeing it that good, highly respected books have good covers. There are MANY and I mean MANY unknown authors who cannot just rely on a "name" (like I bet you do) or book reviews, and they need something to draw readers to their craft. Because visually stimulating causes interest and interest leads to a synopsis scan, a synopsis scan can lead to a peek at the first pages, and since the first few pages of any book are designed to be hooks, it usually means the reader buys the book. Of course, this doesn't happen all the time, but I can say with personal experience that a good looking cover, usually means that a person has spent a lot of time crafting this work that they would have a professional artist tie it together in a neat, sweet looking bow.

    I look at things objectively as a true scientist
    Haha. This cracked me up. You see things as black and white with no deviation in the path. It's the classic, if you were given a choice of a path, you would choose the path more taken. Objectively isn't how a scientist sees things. Looking at things objectively is a a limitation, and should be the last thing to be used to gloat with. Seeing things objectively limits you from really experiencing the fullest true potential. And this is your problem. You are looking at covers objectively, unlike KellInkston and Sigma, who the later has created covers and the former has had covers made for his books, who look at it subjectively. Art is subjective, not objective.

    bad covers can hurt sales but find zero evidence that artsycraftsy covers help enough to pay for them.
    You realize that self published authors are not going out and dropping a couple grand on covers, if they had that form of disposable income they would pay a vanity publisher to publish their book. At most it's a couple hundred, but I've seen very good "artsycraftsy" covers go for as low as $45. Besides, why are you the end of the discussion of a "bad" cover? Why are you the final word on what is good? and what is bad? It's subjective like you said, so why should we be giving you a lick of time? Give me a reason here. If you want evidence, hit up a decently busy book store and watch how many people simply walk up to a shelf and look at the cover first. Besides, what's the harm in possibly having something that can boost your sales? You're talking in circles.

    I just wish you the best on opening your mind.

    the samples you show turn me off and would not get me to pick up the book to look at it.

    I see things as probabilities. And when the odds are stacked in one direction that is the way to bet.
    Almost guaranteed that any self pubber will lose money. Paying for a fancy cover means losing more money.

    I know way too many self pub authors that are dropping hundreds and thousands on covers with the encouragement of so called professional cover artists who tell them they need to do and and actually convince suckers to pay those prices.

    Lots of vanity presses do the same thing for covers, worthless editing, promotion, and other useless add ons.

    My mind is wide open to facts and evidence.

    Nobody has shown me one person who searches for pretty covers.
    They search for authors or topics or genre.
    Then they look at reviews. I read reviews without even noticing the cover thumbnail at all.
    If I did look a bad one might turn me off but no artsy craftsy cover is going to motivate me to continue.

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by astroannie View Post
    What would you consider "proof"? However, if it works for one person, it is a proof-of-concept. I know of one person whose change-of-cover turned a mediocre-seller into a top-seller. Does this mean that a good cover will sell your book? No. What it means is that a good cover can help a good book get attention it would otherwise not receive.

    Of course, maybe all your (not you-personal, you-universal) books suck the doorknob. In which case, it doesn't matter what you dress them in, they'll still suck the doorknob.
    ===========================

    The battle is not alway to the strong
    The race is not always to the swift
    but my bookie said that is the way to bet.

    Nost self pubbers lose money and
    paying hundreds or thousands for a fancy cover just makes the loss even bigger.

    And as you noted 99% of all books are doorknob worthy.
    When every fool can print a book for free or cheap (or pay through the nose if they get suckered by a vanity press) then there are going to be an overwhelming supply of bad books.

  7. #17
    Why are you fixated on this "hundreds or thousands" figure? Did someone shill you out that much? I mean, really, I can get good covers for <$100. It's like telling me I should build my own car because I can't afford a Ferrari.
    Everything you want is just outside your comfort zone.
    Robert G. Allen

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by astroannie View Post
    Why are you fixated on this "hundreds or thousands" figure? Did someone shill you out that much? I mean, really, I can get good covers for <$100. It's like telling me I should build my own car because I can't afford a Ferrari.
    =======================

    yes, you can buy covers cheaper
    but i know people who have paid a lot more than 100

    the professional cover artists sites are trying to sell them for hundreds and thousands of usd

    i actually talked to an artist where i worked about a cover
    and he quoted me an outrageous price for it
    the art he did for our internal documents was mediocre so i would have declined his offer unless it were free

    i still maintain that if you are smart enough to write a book
    then you are smart enough to diy a cover yourself
    dl a template and just do it
    it will be just as good as the so called pro artistes deliver

  9. #19
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  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by sigmadog View Post
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    uh huh

    put budweiser on it and it would sell

    leave the makers name off and put on a pretty picture on that can and it still wont sell

    nobody ever searches for an artsycraftsy cover and then buys a book
    authors sell books not covers
    content sells books not covers
    reviews sell books not covers

    only artistes selling covers claim that fancy covers are so necessary

    dont judge a book by its cover is still good advice

    nobody ever writes a review and raves about the cover

    bad covers can hurt sales
    no cover can ensure enough sales to pay for creating it

    and as you noted 99% of self pubbed authors are not going to sell enough to break even
    so why throw more money away on a fancy cover that wont help sales

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