Thin air and the stream of consciousness


Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: Thin air and the stream of consciousness

  1. #1

    Thin air and the stream of consciousness

    Okay, so I haven't wrote anything in a while, and I got inspiration while cooking, and I posted the byproduct in the Workshop because I don't know will I ever use it again . Post your own writings, BUT, they have to be at least a 100 words, and it has to be something new, something you just came up with (you can post unlimited stories). This thread is not meant to provide critics, BUT, you can, if the member of the critiqued piece agrees with it. I'm fine with both.

    So let's see what's happening in your little heads!
    Last edited by mrmustard615; October 19th, 2016 at 01:20 PM.
    Je suis Charlie.

    "My ambition is handicapped with laziness." - Charles Bukowski
    "The most exciting phrase to hear in science, the one that heralds new discoveries, is not “Eureka!” but “That’s funny…” - Isaac Asimov
    "Sometimes it's the very people who no one imagines anything of who do the things no one can imagine." - Alan Turing
    "Physicists are made of atoms. A physicist is an attempt by an atom to understand itself.” - Michio Kaku
    "No fighting in the War room!" - Dr. Strangelove
    "I'm friends with the mustard that's under my bed" - The Internet

    In memory of Pandora, a beautiful butterfly spreading its wings above the Earth's realm...

  2. #2
    I don't have any fiction for you, but since you asked for what's happening in our heads, I guess a bit of non-fiction/rant?

    Let's think about a hydrogen plasma, just protons and electrons. Due to the size difference between protons and electrons, it's possible to consider the movement of the protons as negligible. This allows us to look at the motion of the electrons as though they are passing through a background of constant charge.

    One way of looking at the behaviour of a plasma is simulation using particle-in-cell (PIC) codes. The idea behind these codes is relatively simple. The easiest way to think of this is in two dimensions, but it can be implemented in one or three dimensions as well. As the number of natural particles, in our case electrons, is really rather large the code uses macro particles. Put simply, each particle in a simulation actually represents a group of physical particles. The code is given an initial condition of these macro particles that specifies particle momentum and distribution at the start of the simulation.

    Now, these particles are placed on a spatial grid comparable to a useful scale of length (typically the Debye wavelength as it represents the maximum distance a particle's charge is felt inside a plasma). If we think about each grid point as the corners of a stack of squares, each individual square contains a certain number of particles. The grid points receive information on the number of particles in the square. As these are charged particles we can calculate a density of charge in each square. From a charge density, using Maxwell's equations, we can calculate the electromagnetic fields being experienced by the particles. The fields found are applied to the grid and are used to move the particles. This process isn't done in real time but in a number of time steps, forming a repeating process of finding the field and moving the particles slightly. This allows us to see snapshots of the development of the plasma over time.

    Now, I hope my explanation made this seem simple enough to understand at any level because this shouldn't be too hard to understand at a basic level. Really, I think school children should be very capable of looking at the basics of this and even doing some interpretation of the data, yet it took until the final year of my degree to come across this. Why?

    I think, because it's inaccessible. Unless you know how to code, or are capable of running someone else's program in a linux terminal and processing the output files in a data analysis software package, you'll probably never do something like this. The length you have to go to just to learn some things is simply too far. All it would take is a decent user interface for a program to make it accessible and usable for just about anyone. Now while there are some advantages to the lack of user interface in some programs (like having an easily changeable code) there is something to be said for giving people the power to simplify complex concepts. It is something that should change but I'm not sure it will.

    This is something that really boils my blood, but I hope you learnt something from my rant.
    Last edited by James 剣 斧 血; October 19th, 2016 at 01:25 PM.

  3. #3
    Reminds me of stuff I did in high school. It's fuzzy now due to brain trauma I've suffered since but it was computer simulations with xenon atoms. And I totally understood it and presented it to other students (who did different summer projects). So yeah, accessibility IS.
    Everything you want is just outside your comfort zone.
    — Robert G. Allen

  4. #4
    Wɾˇʇˇ∩9 bdcharles's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    In a far-distant otherworld.
    Posts
    3,351
    Blog Entries
    4
    Ugh. When put on the spot like this, I am known to freeze up but because I am in possession of a deeply masochistic streak (the product of being raised by a family who valued workplace achievements over anything creative) I recently joined up with an acapella choir. I'm not going to tell you who it is but it frequently involves putting oneself out there, musically-slash-vocally, and coming up with stuff on the fly. And not just any stuff, mind. It has to sound right. You can't just caterwaul and expect to get away with it, no, no, no.

    This has been a captivating exercise. We do alot of vocal improv in which participants are encouraged to come up with a little snippet of melody, sing it, and have others join in on the harmonies. People change it. It becomes like a game of Chinese whispers but to me the most interesting thing about it - well, actually, one of them; another is the simple fact of doing it - is how much it tests your trust in your fellow humans. Going back to my upbringing, I learnt very rapidly that other people are generally not to be trusted. They will take you down just because they can, and they'll smile while doing it.

    But these vocal sessions changed all that - or to be more precise, they have begun to change it. There is a technique in improvisational comedy called "Yes, and..." where you take whatever someone gives you - no questions, no judgments, no pausing to ask if you heard it right - and run with it. Work it a little, and let it evolve. Infuse it with something of your own. They give it to you, and you say "yes, I will take that, and I will add to it and give me more and yes I will give something back to you and yes, you will take that too." It's curious because it was the frst time I really felt the power inherent in bypassing my ego. The ego, for those that aren't sure, is the little micromanager voice yammering away inside of you, desperately trying to manage your brand. "Don't do that!" it squeals. "We'll look like fools!" But with these improv techniques, something new happens. You make a noise that may or may not be in tune, or funny, or whatever you intended, and people accept it. They take it with all the grace and gratitude of a gift recipient. You can see them cherishing it, passing it on to the next person as though it were a rare and fragile dove.

    You gain confidence. You make another noise. You realise then that all these voices and thoughts and sounds inside you, little nuggets of phrase and melody, have a new home - and that's it. You can't stop them charging out then. You learn what works and what doesn't. Sometime you get knockbacks but you just roll with them. No-one is perfect first time, second time, fifty-fifth time. Sometimes we might approach being decent, or pretty good, or not bad or even incredible. Sometimes not. Sometime the person next to you will set up the unholiest racket. It's a trust exercise, a leap of faith. Yes, and you will rise and do it again.



    (you can crit/ask questions/etc if you like, I don't mind)


    Hidden Content Monthly Fiction Challenge


    Beauty is nothing but the beginning of terror which we are barely able to endure, and are awed,
    because it serenely disdains to annihilate us.
    - Rainer Maria Rilke, "Elegy I"

    *

    Is this fire, or is this mask?
    It's the Mantasy!
    - Anonymous

    *

    C'mon everybody, don't need this crap.
    - Wham!





  5. #5
    Wɾˇʇˇ∩9 bdcharles's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    In a far-distant otherworld.
    Posts
    3,351
    Blog Entries
    4
    "A Little Light Nonsense"

    In the ham-ham hair of the ram-ram chair where there's no time to figure it out
    Then the can-can dare and the fan-fan fare and it's best not to blither and shout.
    When the wham wham stares at the bang-bang bears then you'd better start putting it about
    That the cam cam tear wears the bam-bam layers and the fair's not ready to move out.

    Tell my lover to move under the cover 'cos the men are turning up to sing
    Of mountains moved, and fountains blue, and the platitudes of birds in spring.
    If you see them down there, tell them I am over here, and can’t they get to us in under half a minute,
    And if I have to ask again then my birds'll count to ten, and nobody wants that, innit.

    (140 words of it in fact.)


    Hidden Content Monthly Fiction Challenge


    Beauty is nothing but the beginning of terror which we are barely able to endure, and are awed,
    because it serenely disdains to annihilate us.
    - Rainer Maria Rilke, "Elegy I"

    *

    Is this fire, or is this mask?
    It's the Mantasy!
    - Anonymous

    *

    C'mon everybody, don't need this crap.
    - Wham!





Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
This website uses cookies
We use cookies to store session information to facilitate remembering your login information, to allow you to save website preferences, to personalise content and ads, to provide social media features and to analyse our traffic. We also share information about your use of our site with our social media, advertising and analytics partners.