10 Things Every Writer Should Know About Amazon Publishing


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Thread: 10 Things Every Writer Should Know About Amazon Publishing

  1. #1

    10 Things Every Writer Should Know About Amazon Publishing

    I always perk up when I come upon an article like this. And this comes from someone with an agent AND a publisher.


    1. With Amazon Publishing, your books will not be in bookstores. (Is this really that bad? I wonder how many books are bought in stands at airports and other transportation hubs.)
    2. Amazon Publishing is now one of the big six publishers. (Shouldn't surprise anyone)
    3. Your book will not be on bestseller lists. (How many people pay attention to them for fiction?)
    4. Amazon Publishing has user friendly royalty statement (Nice to be able to see how you're doing any time you wish)
    5. Amazon Publishing provides daily sales data
    6. Amazon Publishing has some amazing levers it can pull.
    7. Amazon Publishing will not necessarily pull all its levers for you.
    8. Amazon Publishing marketing has a long tail.
    9. Amazon Publishing works best for writers with multiple books
    10. Amazon Publishing is still a Publisher.


    The full article is @ http://www.writersdigest.com/online-...zon-publishing

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  4. #4
    Member JaneC's Avatar
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    Really enjoyed reading this. Thank you!

  5. #5
    I don't know why there's still such prejudice towards self-publishing these days . . .
    It's daft. The last thing I'd want - and this is just my opinion so no disrespect to anyone who's pursuing traditional publishing - is someone fiddling with my characters and altering my plot, taking bits out and all purely to boost sales. Self-publishing is a Godsend when you want full creative control over your work.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by SolitaryMagpie View Post
    I don't know why there's still such prejudice towards self-publishing these days . . .
    It's daft. The last thing I'd want - and this is just my opinion so no disrespect to anyone who's pursuing traditional publishing - is someone fiddling with my characters and altering my plot, taking bits out and all purely to boost sales. Self-publishing is a Godsend when you want full creative control over your work.
    because marketing by yourself is hard work when you don't know what you are doing, and let's be honest here, most of us don't know what we are doing. because some of us would actually like to make some money. because there is still a prejudice against self-publishing (still justified IMO giving the vast floods of dreck out there, that Amazon has enabled), because having someone WANT to print your book is a huge validation and seeing it in print is another before you even sold anything, and well we all want to sell something. preferably lots of somethings.

  7. #7
    I don't know why there's still such prejudice towards self-publishing these days . . .
    Here's the thing, and I say this as someone who has self released more than a few novels:

    First, it used to be called vanity publishing. Someone who couldn't get a publisher to invest company money in preparing and bringing their work to market had a print house print it for them with plans to market it themselves.

    It used to cost significant money, when print had to be hand set, and even when automated printing arrived, so only people who had a guaranteed market—and money—went that route. And they took the steps a publisher would, with professional editing and prep.

    But now, it's free, because Amazon, instead of the publisher's model, which is to sell a million of one book, takes the approach that they'll settle for one book from a million people. And as a result, the vast majority of self published work, to be kind, sucks. It's written by people who aren't even aware that the writing we all learn is nonfiction, because that's the kind of writing employers need. The work hasn't been edited (or has by someone who has no experience with a real publisher or on other then self published work. Many are writers who have failed to sell a manuscript). And their sales reflect that. Amazon doesn't edit. They translate your input file, automatically, and release it—again, automatically. Human eyes aren't involved. No one fact-checks it. No one asks where it will be shelved, cares. That's why I mostly use the term self-release, because the act of talking a file and translating it to a format for purchase isn't publishing.

    There's a vast difference between a pro who decides to self release and someone who says, "I got me a good idea for a story, so I'll rite a book," and who do no study into the basics of writing for the page. Unfortunately,most self pubs fall into the second category. And that's why self-release has a bad reputation. It's also why sites like this one are so great, because a little knowledge makes a huge difference.

    Sorry for the rant. I feel better now.

    As for Amazon, yes, they can really help...if your book is selling in large numbers. But for all but a tiny fraction, the only people who will see your page are people who are looking for it. Other then that, if you're lucky, and prolific, like me, you'll be making tens of dollars each month.

    But if you are doing your own releasing, don't ignore Smashwords. A book placed with them, if approved (and most are) will also appear on B&N, Kubo, Overdrive, and iBooks. Their sales aren't as great as Amazon, but every bit helps, and neither damands exclusivity.

    If you go with Amazon, don't forget that while they will accept a Word document as input, the resulting book file will be much larger than the same book supplied to them as Mobi and the other Kindle formats. And that translates to Amazon taking a bigger cut of the sale price because of the size.

  8. #8
    Rant away. I enjoy a good old debate.


    I agree with you. I am fully aware that numerous self-published books are utter garbage. That many, if not the majority, of people who publish through Amazon and similar print-on-demand services perhaps don't have the patience or the capacity to develop their stories, characters, and indeed their writing.

    For example, I've seen a lot of teenagers use self-publishing, and that isn't to say teenagers are incompetent or negligent when it comes to writing at all; there are some incredibly talented young writers out there, undoubtedly, but certainly the ease of use associated with modern-day self-publishing can prompt a kind of rashness in people, particularly young, creative individuals who, in their eagerness to hold their very own published book in their hands, likely don't give much forethought to developing their skills before pressing that button.


    In truth, I can't blame anyone for wanting that. What aspiring writer doesn't dream of that moment? But, yes, naturally, it does contribute to the problem, so I do understand where you're coming from entirely and I respect your opinion. However, I think a blatant and resolute snobbery towards all self-published books and their authors is, frankly, I think, incredibly narrow-minded. It's soul destroying to think, if like myself, you spend so many years of your life dedicated to producing a clean, well-written, thorough and professionally edited manuscript and still opt to go with self-publishing because of the creative freedom and control it offers, only to find peoples' prejudice prevents your book from being picked up. It's unfair.

    See, I'm ranting now!

    Thanks for the advice, by the way. I am grateful for the knowledge. And congratulations on being published. You're living my dream - whether it makes money or not! Call me a dreamer, but I'd sooner have one incredibly good book to my name and manage to get by, as opposed to being incredibly rich and successful and feel unfulfilled and regretful that I just couldn't find the time or the mental strength to produce that story I had to tell.
    "To trust is to our peril, but to not is to be alone. And then ― oh, the silence . . ."
    - Cream, River

  9. #9
    Good read, but I think #5 should say that Amazon has HOURLY sales data... and YES, it is addicting to watch.

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