What book has most inspired your writing? - Page 4


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Thread: What book has most inspired your writing?

  1. #31
    Tolkien created one of the popular books of all time.
    It is always a matter of opinion/taste, to my mind he is longwinded at times, and the ending is lousy. I have read it three times, once to myself and twice aloud to children, I found myself getting more critical.

    Presently on Graham Green, 'The Human Factor'. Not about a slave trader, but MI5 and international politics, on a human level.
    Visit my website to read and connect to my 'soundcloud', where you can listen to stories songs and more
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  2. #32
    Hi PockyPokolro!
    That's a very good question!
    For me personally, these are ray Bradbury's books.
    His imagination sometimes makes you look at an ordinary object (like a sea shell) in a different way, and then try to transfer the freshness of this experience in your own writing.

  3. #33
    Agreed with the ending oily buckle which was very underwhelming and disappointing. That is where ironically after getting there I stopped reading it. I skipped the ending but the rest of the story was very atmospheric, compelling, intriguing, and emotionally charged. I saw it as an allegory between greed influenced by Christian values (I did read some of its influences). I even looked up in a dictionary words in a summer vacation of reading it in its entirety (words such as cloven, hillock). Even though foundation by Issac Asimov won that year the nebula, this deserved to win over it (because it was in the final nomination). It regularly gets voted, sometimes in important polls as a clear favorite of readers. When it was first released no one knew what to make of it. Because it changed the genre drastically. I'll be honest and say I haven't read the foundation. I read the hobbit afterwards, and that was a good read. However, I understand why people would not consider it their favorite choice of all of the fantasy genre.
    I would follow as in believe in the words of good moral leaders. Rather than the beliefs of oneself.
    The most difficult thing for a writer to comprehend is to experience silence, so speak up. (quoted from a member)

  4. #34
    When it was first released no one knew what to make of it. Because it changed the genre drastically
    .This may be true in the literary world, I don't know, but just about everything he used is to be found in traditional stories, from the underlying theme of a hero on a quest and the wise old advisor who comes and goes, to the individual mythical beings, like dwarves, elves, or trolls. He put them all together in a written story, that's what a good education gives you, the information and the ability to present it in new and useful forms
    Visit my website to read and connect to my 'soundcloud', where you can listen to stories songs and more
    Hidden Content

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  5. #35
    Can I put two? Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, and Forrest Gump.

  6. #36
    Member willowarc's Avatar
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    I do not think that I could possibly identify any singular book that has influenced my writing. Television and music, maybe, but not really anything literary.

  7. #37
    It's a two-way tie:

    *A Catcher in the Rye (boring and predictable, I know)
    *The Devil and Sonny Liston (Nick Tosches)

    Each speak to my insane, often profane, sensibilities.

  8. #38
    The author who originally made me believe that writing might be a worthwhile expenditure of my effort was Faulkner, with an assist to Ross MacDonald. Remember doing a piece to that effect back in the nineties. Wasted a few decades on that illusion but I'm better now.
    A conclusion is the place where you got tired of thinking. Steven Wright

  9. #39
    too many to list..

  10. #40
    Huckleberry Fynn, Mark Twain
    Riddley Walker, Russel Hoban
    Tao Te Ching, Lao Tsu
    Collected Short Stories, Ernest Hemingway
    Catcher in the Rye, J.D.Salinger
    Cold Mountain, Charles Frasier
    A Good Man is Hard to Find, Flannery O’Conner
    In Parenthesis, David Jones
    Plainsong, Kent Haruf
    Catch 22, Joseph Heller
    Slaughterhouse Five, Kurt Vonnegut
    As I Lay Dying, William Faulkner
    Lord of the Flies, William Golding
    To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee
    Deliverence, James Dickey
    Heart of Darkness, Joseph Conrad
    The Moviegoer, Walker Percy
    On the Road, Jack Kerouac
    The Road, Cormac MacCarthy
    For Whom the Bell Tolls, Ernest Hemingway
    1984, George Orwell
    The Time Machine, H.G. Wells
    One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, Ken Keasy
    The Alienist, Caleb Carr
    War and Peace, Leo Tolstoy
    The Trial, Franz Kafka
    A Soldier of the Great War, Mark Helprin

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