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Thread: What book has most inspired your writing?

  1. #21
    I have just finished 'White fang', yes it struck me as allegorical, but there were also times when I felt pandered to, as though he was writing more what he thought his audience wanted to hear than what he necessarily believed himself.
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  2. #22
    Mentor Megan Pearson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Olly Buckle View Post
    I have just finished 'White fang', yes it struck me as allegorical, but there were also times when I felt pandered to, as though he was writing more what he thought his audience wanted to hear than what he necessarily believed himself.
    Quite possibly true. He wrote his dog stories in ten-minute spurts with gallons of coffee trying to raise the money to get of Alaska, or so I seem to remember. I don't think he liked doing what he did for a living. I last read it...fifteen years ago? I don't like mushy stories but twice I've read White Fang and neither time did I escape the ending without bawling. (How embarrassing!) Whether or not he believed what he wrote, the essence of that story really spoke to me. I'd like the essence of what I write to really speak to people too, although I'm okay if they don't end up sobbing. (It was a happy sort-of thing and is kind-of difficult to explain.)
    Last edited by Megan Pearson; December 29th, 2018 at 04:31 AM. Reason: syntactical correction

  3. #23
    I think life, not books, inspired my writing. As for my style of writing, if I could identify one then I might be able to guess how I acquired it, but no conscious process has ever been involved to my knowledge, so equally I can't identify any conscious influences. In fact the one clear characteristic of my writing lies in its essentially unconscious origins apparently.

    A well written book is so transparent that the reader only experiences the story within it without noticing how it got into their mind. Therefore I wouldn't want to write in a style that I could remember ever reading because to remember that style would imply that that book had failed in its objective of being transparent. It's like asking someone what the most inspiring window was that they ever looked through.

    In fact I know the most inspiring window that I ever looked through because it was curved and set out in such a way that it showed no reflections at all and therefore appeared not to be there. I could see how it was constructed and so understood how it worked, but I don't have sufficient skill yet to understand how an entirely transparent book that doesn't reflect distracting images, especially of the writer, can be constructed and if I have read any such then I simply wouldn't know. The characteristic of that window that impressed me was that I simply couldn't see it in the way that one can see conventional windows, as a consequence of their shortcomings. That is how I would want to write if I ever took my writing seriously, absolutely transparently. The story is everything and every one should be quite unique. Analysis is for window-cleaners.
    'Sharing an experience creates a reality.' Create a new reality today.
    'There has to be some give and take.' If I can take my time I'm willing to give it.
    'The most difficult criticism that a writer has to comprehend is silence.' So speak up.

  4. #24
    Member Guard Dog's Avatar
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    What booK? You've gotta have just one?

    I can't do it. I've gotten too much from too many sources.

    In fact, giving a complete list of what's influenced me would be lengthy and time consuming.


    G.D.
    Leave it be and it won't bother you.
    Screw with it, and it'll eat you alive.

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  5. #25
    Not all the ones that influenced you, G D , just the one that influenced you most. I guess all of us were influenced in some way by every book we ever read, but some were more significant than others, and for an awful lot of people there is one that stands out. That, of course, might mean they need to read more
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  6. #26
    Member Guard Dog's Avatar
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    That's the problem, Olly; I can't pick one out of the lot that had any more or less influence than the others.

    ...there might very well be one, but I damn sure don't know what it would be any more.


    G.D.
    Leave it be and it won't bother you.
    Screw with it, and it'll eat you alive.

    Soon enough, nations will play second fiddle to corporations.

    "The world is not what we wish it to be; it is what it is."
    "Freedom is the value, not protection."

  7. #27
    Mentor Megan Pearson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Olly Buckle View Post
    Not all the ones that influenced you, G D , just the one that influenced you most. I guess all of us were influenced in some way by every book we ever read, but some were more significant than others, and for an awful lot of people there is one that stands out. That, of course, might mean they need to read more
    I went with category, length of influence (for how long), & first thing that came to mind. A different category & more thought would have yielded a different fave.

  8. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by Guard Dog View Post
    That's the problem, Olly; I can't pick one out of the lot that had any more or less influence than the others.

    ...there might very well be one, but I damn sure don't know what it would be any more.


    G.D.
    Try 'Plain tales from the hills' by Rudyard Kipling, and look at it from the point of view of short story construction. That influenced my writing quite a bit, he is a master at it. Then again, this whole thread could make not a bad reading list, so I can see where you are coming from.
    Visit my website to read and connect to my 'soundcloud', where you can listen to stories songs and more
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  9. #29
    Member Cunningstuff's Avatar
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    I read Ender's Game as a short story, then a novella, then a novel, then a series. I adore Gene Wolfe, Tolkien and Glen Cook. But.. probably... House of Leaves by Mark Z. Danielewski, incredible, just incredible to take all the rules and break them, do it in a new way. It still sticks in my mind, that story. Thomas Pynchon's "Gravity's Rainbow" is the other one, and to be honest, it's all about the Freudians! Oh what a grand interest and compelling conspiracy.

  10. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by Cunningstuff View Post
    I read Ender's Game as a short story, then a novella, then a novel, then a series. I adore Gene Wolfe, Tolkien and Glen Cook. But.. probably... House of Leaves by Mark Z. Danielewski, incredible, just incredible to take all the rules and break them, do it in a new way. It still sticks in my mind, that story. Thomas Pynchon's "Gravity's Rainbow" is the other one, and to be honest, it's all about the Freudians! Oh what a grand interest and compelling conspiracy.
    Sounds like a good and interesting selection of authors and works. My brother who doesn't like mass science fiction produced nowadays favorites were enders game and 1984.

    As for me tolkien's most famous works, alfred bester's best works, and short story collections. I want to read James Blish as my next pick as he wrote first I think about airships in science fiction. Tolkien created one of the popular books of all time. One day someone commented on it being the best book they had read. So I had to read it.
    I would follow as in believe in the words of good moral leaders. Rather than the beliefs of oneself.
    The most difficult thing for a writer to comprehend is to experience silence, so speak up. (quoted from a member)

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