ER/OR jargon - any ER nurses or doctors here?


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Thread: ER/OR jargon - any ER nurses or doctors here?

  1. #1
    Member PaperbackWriter's Avatar
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    ER/OR jargon - any ER nurses or doctors here?

    Hello,
    I thought this topic might have been asked already since it seems like it would be a common one but I didn't see anything in the threads list.

    I need just a couple lines/orders that might be spoken between doctors and nurses as a patient is about to die on the operating table after being brought into the emergency room. If it helps, the patient has been shot, but I don't specify where.

    Unfortunately, my experience in this area is limited to the movies where they mostly say things like "get the crash cart" and "we're losing her/him".

    What would they really say if she is about to die? I want to suggest that the patient dies instead of telling the reader that she dies.

    Thanks!

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    Member RhythmOvPain's Avatar
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    YouTube.

    Scrubs.

    The serious parts.
    My favorite word in the English language is "shenanigans." My favorite thing to do is cause them.

    Smoke weed everyday.

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    Member PaperbackWriter's Avatar
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    Hm, can you narrow it down for me?

  4. #4
    I found this to be really interesting.

    Communication between doctors and nurses in the emergency department


    Quote Originally Posted by PaperbackWriter View Post
    Hm, can you narrow it down for me?
    ER:

    I would suggest watching videos from Untold Stories of the ER.


    [Content Warning]



    Post-ER:

    8 Things to Say When Your Patient Dies

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    Member Sonata's Avatar
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    Apologies. Incorrect posting
    Last edited by Sonata; April 24th, 2016 at 07:55 AM.
    If you talk to a cat they look at you as if you are way below their intelligence to even listen.
    However, when you talk to a dog they look at you with such admiration and really do seem to understand what you are saying.
    Even if it is a bit silly...
    ...they still think you are wonderful.


  6. #6
    Member RhythmOvPain's Avatar
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    Arg, it's actually harder to find a good video detailing a scene where the patient is about to die, a lot of these are the after effects.

    There's so much realism in Scrubs (more than any other hospital show), but it's carpeted over with absurd comedy.
    Last edited by RhythmOvPain; April 24th, 2016 at 10:31 AM.
    My favorite word in the English language is "shenanigans." My favorite thing to do is cause them.

    Smoke weed everyday.

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    Member PaperbackWriter's Avatar
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    Thanks for taking the time to help. The video reinforced the term "BP's dropping" statement I've heard so many times before. I'm going to use that but I need just one more.

    I didn't see any examples of the wording of specific orders between doctors and nurses in the Communication between doctors and nurses in the emergency department article. It seems to be more about communication in general. The post ER (8 things...) being after the fact doesn't give me any specific wording either.

    Do you have any idea if they still say (or have ever said) "Get the crash cart."?

    The story is through the perspective of the patient and I want her to hear something very specific just before she loses consciousness that would suggest to the readers that she dies without actually telling them she dies.

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    Member PaperbackWriter's Avatar
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  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by PaperbackWriter View Post
    I didn't see any examples of the wording of specific orders between doctors and nurses in the Communication between doctors and nurses in the emergency department article. It seems to be more about communication in general. The post ER (8 things...) being after the fact doesn't give me any specific wording either.
    Oh, I know it wasn't helpful. I am sorry I didn't clarify that it was just "interesting to know" ... I studied Linguistics. I am all about the language.

    Try this ... link.

  10. #10
    Member Sonata's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PaperbackWriter View Post
    The story is through the perspective of the patient and I want her to hear something very specific just before she loses consciousness that would suggest to the readers that she dies without actually telling them she dies.
    A patient on the point of death would not be aware of the fact that she or he was dying.

    Having worked in an ER, although many years ago now, I never heard any of those comments supposedly made by ER doctors or nurses.

    They are pure television chat. Not reality.
    If you talk to a cat they look at you as if you are way below their intelligence to even listen.
    However, when you talk to a dog they look at you with such admiration and really do seem to understand what you are saying.
    Even if it is a bit silly...
    ...they still think you are wonderful.


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