Which is correct, 'of' or 'from'?


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Thread: Which is correct, 'of' or 'from'?

  1. #1
    Member Sonata's Avatar
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    Which is correct, 'of' or 'from'?

    Reading through the "Hatched, Matched and Dispatched" announcements [births, engagements/marriages, deaths] section in a British newspaper, I saw the comment that "[name] had died of cancer."

    Should that not have been "died from cancer" or is "of cancer" correct?
    If you talk to a cat they look at you as if you are way below their intelligence to even listen.
    However, when you talk to a dog they look at you with such admiration and really do seem to understand what you are saying.
    Even if it is a bit silly...
    ...they still think you are wonderful.


  2. #2
    I'm not sure you're going to get one single answer on this.

    Before I looked it up, 'died of cancer' sounded normal to me.

    Places like the Oxford dictionary seem to concur:

    VERB (dies, dying, died)

    [NO OBJECT]1
    (Of a person, animal, or plant) stop living:he died of AIDS
    trees are dying from acid rain
    [WITH OBJECT]: the king died a violent death
    http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/us...on/english/die

  3. #3
    Member Reichelina's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flint View Post
    I'm not sure you're going to get one single answer on this.

    Before I looked it up, 'died of cancer' sounded normal to me.

    Places like the Oxford dictionary seem to concur:



    http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/us...on/english/die
    Yeah. I'm no english expert, you "die of something", the direct cause of death; while when you "die from something", indirect cause of death?

    I looked it up too just to be sure. Some pips agree. Haha.

    "We will all laugh at gilded butterflies."

    "Sometimes I can feel my bones straining
    under the weight of all the lives I'm not living."
    Jonathan Safran Foer, Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close



    Ecclesiastes 1:18 For in much wisdom is much grief:
    and he that increaseth knowledge increaseth sorrow.

  4. #4
    Member Radrook's Avatar
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    They both mean that the person died because he or she had cancer.
    Anyone familiar with the English language isn't going to see either expression as ambiguous.

    He died of a bullet wound.
    He died from a bullet wound.

    Means he died BECAUSE OF a bullet wound or death was caused BY a bullet wound.

  5. #5
    Member Sonata's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Reichelina View Post
    Yeah. I'm no english expert, you "die of something", the direct cause of death; while when you "die from something", indirect cause of death?
    It made me wonder because if someone dies because they are hit by a truck, you would not say "he died of being hit by a truck" would you? Surely it would be "he died from being hit by a truck".

    It is just that "died of cancer" sounded wrong to me because cancer killed him, like the truck would kill someone if it him them, therefore I would have thought that from cancer was correct, but then I did not study English, which is my mother tongue, therefore I asked because I was interested in which was correct.

    But then in the Celtic traditional song "Molly Malone" there is the line "She died of a fever".
    If you talk to a cat they look at you as if you are way below their intelligence to even listen.
    However, when you talk to a dog they look at you with such admiration and really do seem to understand what you are saying.
    Even if it is a bit silly...
    ...they still think you are wonderful.


  6. #6
    Member Reichelina's Avatar
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    Which is correct, 'of' or 'from'?

    of
    əv/
    preposition
    preposition: of
    1.
    expressing the relationship between a part and a whole.
    "the sleeve of his coat"
    2.
    expressing the relationship between a scale or measure and a value.
    "an increase of 5 percent"
    expressing an age.
    "a boy of fifteen"
    3.
    indicating an association between two entities, typically one of belonging.
    "the son of a friend"
    expressing the relationship between an author, artist, or composer and their works collectively.
    "the plays of Shakespeare"
    4.
    expressing the relationship between a direction and a point of reference.
    "north of Chicago"
    5.
    expressing the relationship between a general category and the thing being specified which belongs to such a category.
    "the city of Prague"
    governed by a noun expressing the fact that a category is vague.
    "this type of book"
    6.
    indicating the relationship between a verb and an indirect object.
    with a verb expressing a mental state.
    "they must be persuaded of the severity of the problem"
    expressing a cause.
    "he died of cancer"
    7.
    indicating the material or substance constituting something.
    "the house was built of bricks"

    "We will all laugh at gilded butterflies."

    "Sometimes I can feel my bones straining
    under the weight of all the lives I'm not living."
    Jonathan Safran Foer, Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close



    Ecclesiastes 1:18 For in much wisdom is much grief:
    and he that increaseth knowledge increaseth sorrow.

  7. #7
    Of is just a preposition that creates a connection. Of and from can be used interchangeably in this respect: Bilbo baggins of the Shire; Bilbo Baggins from the Shire.


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